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BUSINESS
July 13, 1999 | CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After weathering Brazil's devaluation earlier this year, Latin America confronted another brewing crisis in Argentina on Monday when stocks fell 8.7% after a presidential candidate issued a call for a debt-repayment moratorium. Although economists say chances of a Russia-style debt default are remote in Argentina, the comments by candidate Eduardo Duhalde added to the jitteriness of the nation's markets, already rattled by a deepening recession, rising unemployment and looming political turmoil.
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NEWS
January 1, 2002 | HECTOR TOBAR and VANESSA PETIT, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Leaders of several of Argentina's most important political parties were close to an agreement Monday to form a "government of national salvation" that would place a powerful senator in charge of this troubled country for the next two years.
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NEWS
July 9, 1995 | Reuters
Argentine President Carlos Menem was sworn in for a second term Saturday, pledging to fight the growing unemployment that has tarnished his "economic miracle" of fast growth and low inflation. "I am fully aware that this is what the people expect of me," Menem, 65, said in his inaugural speech in Buenos Aires. The Peronist leader, in office since 1989, faces daunting economic challenges but has unprecedented backing both in Congress and from ordinary Argentines.
NEWS
December 31, 2001 | HECTOR TOBAR and VANESSA PETIT, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The interim president of Argentina resigned late Sunday after just a week in office, saying lack of support from members of his own party prevented him from leading his country out of its profound economic and political crisis. The resignation of Adolfo Rodriguez Saa, who took power after riots brought down Fernando de la Rua, came after a weekend of demonstrations on the streets of this capital city and fighting within the leadership of the ruling Peronist party.
NEWS
August 12, 1994 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As tens of thousands rallied outside Congress to condemn a deadly bombing at a Jewish community center here last month, a speaker announced the arrival of President Carlos Saul Menem. The rain-soaked air was suddenly filled with whistles--the Argentine equivalent of boos and hisses. Apparently chastened by the unfriendly reception, Menem, who rarely misses a chance to address a crowd, chose not to speak.
NEWS
May 25, 1990 | JAMES F. SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If there were a candidate's handbook on electioneering in Latin America, it would need to include this new rule: Assure the voters that you are particularly well qualified because you lack experience in politics. In a growing number of countries, and especially those with grave economic and social problems, newcomers and outsiders alike are dishing out embarrassing defeats to traditional politicians and old-line parties.
NEWS
August 4, 1996 | SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Before their uneasy alliance broke up, President Carlos Menem and his former economy minister, Domingo Cavallo, made history. Together they carried out the most ambitious economic transformation in Latin America. In five years, Argentina conquered hyper-inflation, privatized most state companies and opened its markets to the world. Argentina's newfound stability has made it a leading regional power.
NEWS
September 10, 1999 | SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former Gen. Lino Oviedo, the fugitive Paraguayan political boss who is suspected of ordering the assassination of his archrival in March, appears to spread strife wherever he goes. Five months after fleeing Paraguay for Argentina, Oviedo has become a divisive issue in Argentine politics and in South America's increasingly tense Mercosur trading bloc. He may also become a test case in a region trying to end a tradition of impunity for dictators, military strongmen and others of their ilk.
NEWS
October 23, 1999 | SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Smoke rises from crop fires in the afternoon heat, drifting across an abject rural landscape that seems a world away from the cosmopolitan capital governed by Buenos Aires Mayor Fernando de la Rua. Argentina's remote northern province of Formosa did not fare well during a decade of change that brought blessings and curses: growth and unemployment, modernity and corruption.
NEWS
March 31, 1992 | WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A couple of days after a devastating car bomb blew up the Israeli Embassy in Buenos Aires, President Carlos Saul Menem remarked: "We are the recipients of a terrorist act that, of course, Argentina has nothing to do with." Menem's reading seemed to be that this sample of Mideast savagery had been transposed willy-nilly halfway around the world and arbitrarily visited upon an innocent Argentine nation.
NEWS
December 22, 2001 | HECTOR TOBAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A provincial senator took power in Argentina on Friday, but only for a day, as uncertainty reigned in the wake of violent protests that drove the old government from office. Ramon Puerta, head of the Senate, became president Friday morning after an extraordinary session of both houses of Congress accepted the resignation of Fernando de la Rua, whose presidency ended amid a flurry of looting and violence in which at least 25 people died and 1,200 were arrested.
NEWS
December 21, 2001 | HECTOR TOBAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Fernando de la Rua resigned Thursday as tens of thousands of Argentines defied a state of siege he had declared less than 24 hours earlier when violence tore through the recession-ravaged country. De la Rua stepped down after opposition legislators in the Peronist party declined his offer to form a government of national unity, the president's last hope of holding on to power after two days of rioting that shook many of the nation's largest cities.
BUSINESS
July 17, 2001 | CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a move designed to reassure nervous investors, President Fernando de la Rua reached agreement Monday night with the main opposition governors to back a plan that would cut the budget. The agreement was announced hours after the stock market continued its plunge. The pact's details are to announced today. "We have arrived at an agreement in fundamental concepts to arrive at zero deficit," Cabinet chief and lead negotiator Chrystian Colombo told reporters. Salta Gov.
NEWS
March 19, 2001 | Associated Press
President Fernando de la Rua on Sunday appealed to Argentina's political parties to band together and form a national unity government to confront a growing political crisis. In a nationally televised address, De la Rua said he will ask Congress to grant him "special emergency powers" to cope with the crisis. He added that he will soon unveil a new government that includes a cross-section of parties after a new austerity program threatened to rupture his own two-party ruling coalition.
NEWS
October 11, 2000 | SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Fernando de la Rua of Argentina downplayed Tuesday the political turmoil that threatens the survival of his ruling coalition, saying his government remains firm despite the surprise resignation of the vice president. De la Rua said he reasserted control with his Cabinet shake-up last week that caused the resignation of Vice President Carlos Alvarez, the architect of the two-party Alliance coalition.
NEWS
October 23, 1999 | SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Smoke rises from crop fires in the afternoon heat, drifting across an abject rural landscape that seems a world away from the cosmopolitan capital governed by Buenos Aires Mayor Fernando de la Rua. Argentina's remote northern province of Formosa did not fare well during a decade of change that brought blessings and curses: growth and unemployment, modernity and corruption.
NEWS
March 19, 2001 | Associated Press
President Fernando de la Rua on Sunday appealed to Argentina's political parties to band together and form a national unity government to confront a growing political crisis. In a nationally televised address, De la Rua said he will ask Congress to grant him "special emergency powers" to cope with the crisis. He added that he will soon unveil a new government that includes a cross-section of parties after a new austerity program threatened to rupture his own two-party ruling coalition.
NEWS
August 1, 1998 | SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With a combination of political vision, instinct and subterfuge, President Carlos Menem made the Argentina of the 1990s the Menem era. Those qualities, which lead political analysts to compare him to a chess player who sees 10 moves ahead, are on full display these days as a result of Menem's surprise announcement that he will not seek a third term.
NEWS
September 10, 1999 | SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former Gen. Lino Oviedo, the fugitive Paraguayan political boss who is suspected of ordering the assassination of his archrival in March, appears to spread strife wherever he goes. Five months after fleeing Paraguay for Argentina, Oviedo has become a divisive issue in Argentine politics and in South America's increasingly tense Mercosur trading bloc. He may also become a test case in a region trying to end a tradition of impunity for dictators, military strongmen and others of their ilk.
BUSINESS
July 13, 1999 | CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After weathering Brazil's devaluation earlier this year, Latin America confronted another brewing crisis in Argentina on Monday when stocks fell 8.7% after a presidential candidate issued a call for a debt-repayment moratorium. Although economists say chances of a Russia-style debt default are remote in Argentina, the comments by candidate Eduardo Duhalde added to the jitteriness of the nation's markets, already rattled by a deepening recession, rising unemployment and looming political turmoil.
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