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Argentina Revolts

NEWS
January 18, 1988 | WILLIAM R. LONG, Times Staff Writer
Government troops and tanks surrounded a provincial infantry regiment Sunday after rebellious officers took control of the unit and defied the authority of the army chief of staff. The mutiny, led by a renegade lieutenant colonel, erupted earlier in the day in scattered provincial units of the Argentine army, and loyal government forces mobilized in efforts to contain the crisis.
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NEWS
April 19, 1987 | From Times Wire Services
Troops loyal to Argentina's civilian authorities Saturday surrounded a building in which a group of renegade army officers had barricaded themselves in protest of the trials of military men accused of human rights violations during this country's so-called "dirty war" against subversion in the 1970s.
NEWS
April 21, 1987 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, Times Staff Writer
Argentine President Raul Alfonsin followed a dramatic Easter victory over military mutineers Monday by shuffling the command structure of his troubled armed forces. Alfonsin's army commander, Gen. Hector Rios Erenu, who had proved unable to suffocate the vest-pocket rebellion by disaffected officers, was retired at his own request, the government announced. Eight other generals are also being retired at their request, a government communique said late Monday.
NEWS
December 6, 1990 | JAMES GERSTENZANG and WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Two days after a violent military insurrection was put down by troops loyal to President Carlos Saul Menem, President Bush on Wednesday lauded the budding but fragile democracy in Argentina. Arriving in Buenos Aires less than 12 hours after Menem lifted a state of siege imposed at the start of the uprising, Bush said that "the message today from Argentina is clear--democracy is here to stay."
NEWS
May 8, 1988 | DAN MORAIN, Times Staff Writer
Shortly before authorities whisked him from a jail here Saturday, retired Argentine Gen. Carlos Suarez Mason admitted ordering the arrest of celebrated Argentine newspaper publisher Jacobo Timerman, according to an attorney who interviewed him. In a deposition, Suarez Mason discussed his role in the 1970s Argentine military government for the first time since his arrest last year, admitting writing orders that set forth the campaign to quell internal dissent. U.S.
NEWS
April 17, 1987 | From Times Wire Services
Argentine President Raul Alfonsin on Thursday urged a renegade army major and his backers, holed up for a second night in a military camp near Cordoba, to surrender rather than fight. The confrontation represented the worst crisis of Alfonsin's 40-month-old administration.
NEWS
April 22, 1987 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, Times Staff Writer
Anger and division within the officer corps of Argentina's troubled army flared anew Tuesday, with a apparently stillborn revolt by two small provincial garrisons. Two days after President Raul Alfonsin personally ended a larger mutiny, unrelieved military disgust over his human rights policy and insistence on civilian control over the armed forces sparked the new, short-lived resistance.
NEWS
December 4, 1990 | WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A rebellious faction of Argentine officers staged a bloody but unsuccessful anti-government uprising Monday, two days before a scheduled visit here by President Bush. Rebels seized the army headquarters in downtown Buenos Aires, a block from the presidential palace, and three other military installations, battling troops loyal to the government throughout the day. The hostilities included heavy rifle fire, cannon shots and even aerial bombing of rebel tanks.
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