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Arie Luyendyk

SPORTS
March 24, 1996 | SHAV GLICK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One of the Indy Racing League's biggest worries--a shortage of cars for race day--became a concern Saturday when only 21 qualified for today's DuraLube 200 at Phoenix International Raceway. Former Indy 500 winner Arie Luyendyk ran a track record 183.599 mph to wrest the pole from rookie Richie Hearn of Canyon Country, who earlier had bettered Bryan Herta's year-old record with a lap of 182.797. Both Luyendyk and Hearn drove Reynard-Cosworths. Herta's record was 181.952.
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SPORTS
April 22, 1991 | From Associated Press
Arie Luyendyk got a monkey off his back Sunday, winning the Valvoline 200 in Phoenix for his first victory since the Indianapolis 500 last May. "It's really great to get that off my shoulders," the Dutchman said after Danny Sullivan's blown engine allowed him to drive his Chevrolet-powered Lola across the finish line on the one-mile Phoenix International Raceway oval under a combination of checker and yellow flags.
SPORTS
June 9, 1997 | From Associated Press
First, A.J. Foyt fought his own reenactment of the Alamo in victory lane of Texas Motor Speedway. He had friends there, notably Billy Boat, his driver who had been declared winner of the True Value 500K. Nearby were Davey Hamilton, a Foyt driver listed as second, and about 300 folks who had come up from Houston to root Foyt's team along. It wasn't as though he needed the help.
SPORTS
May 24, 1993 | SHAV GLICK
When he is not driving race cars, Indy 500 pole-sitter Arie Luyendyk runs an art gallery in Union Station at Indianapolis. He originally opened the gallery in his hometown of Scottsdale, Ariz., but moved it to Indianapolis last August because of more race-oriented exposure. Wednesday night, Luyendyk will hold an auction of motor racing art and memorabilia to benefit the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children.
SPORTS
May 27, 1996 | SHAV GLICK
Arie Luyendyk, the fastest qualifier and only former winner in the Indy 500, called Sunday's race "the most disappointing day in my career." Luyendyk, who started 20th after his original qualifying speed was nullified when his car was found to be underweight, had moved to second by Lap 95, when he tangled with Eliseo Salazar coming out of the pits. "I stalled the engine and that started the problem," Luyendyk said. "I beat him out of the pits. I beat him to the blend line and then he hit me.
SPORTS
May 15, 2003 | Shav Glick, Times Staff Writer
Still woozy from Friday's hard crash into the Turn 1 wall during practice for the Indianapolis 500, two-time champion Arie Luyendyk and Speedway medical director Dr. Henry Bock agreed Wednesday that Luyendyk should not drive in the May 25 race. "Since the crash, I noticed I wasn't as coherent as I should be," Luyendyk said in announcing his decision. "Obviously, my back and neck had some pain, so I got in touch with Dr. Bock and told him I didn't think I was ready to get back in the car."
SPORTS
May 31, 1993 | SHAV GLICK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Wily old Emerson Fittipaldi knew he had a rookie in his sights--even if it was Nigel Mansell, the 1992 world Formula One champion--when it came time for a crucial restart Sunday in the Indianapolis 500. Mansell appeared to be on his way to a stunning victory in the first oval race of his career when he took the lead from teammate Mario Andretti with 25 laps remaining and kept Fittipaldi and pole-sitter Arie Luyendyk at bay until Lyn St. James' car stalled at the pit entrance.
SPORTS
May 23, 1999 | SHAV GLICK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Arie Luyendyk, motor racing's Dutch Master, has said all year that the 83rd Indianapolis 500 would be the final race of his Indy car career, and he has said that he wanted to finish on a high note. The 45-year-old two-time Indy 500 winner took a large step toward that goal by stealing the pole for next Sunday's 500 away from favorite Greg Ray, who had the fastest car on five of seven practice days, and also the fastest speed of the month.
SPORTS
May 13, 1996 | SHAV GLICK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Frustrated and angered at being bumped from the Indianapolis 500 pole and later having his own qualifying run disallowed Saturday, Arie Luyendyk came back Sunday and drove four laps for the history books. The Flying Dutchman, 1990 winner and marquee name of the new Indy Racing League, blistered Indianapolis Motor Speedway's 2 1/2-mile rectangular oval at 237.498 mph for one lap and 236.986 for a four-lap qualifying average. Only a few thousand spectators were present when Luyendyk rolled the No.
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