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Arizona Immigration Law

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NEWS
February 22, 2012 | By Michael A. Memoli
Mitt Romney called the controversial Arizona illegal immigration law a model for the country, and blasted the Obama administration for challenging it in court. "I will drop those lawsuits on Day One," Romney said in response to a question on illegal immigration during a GOP candidate debate in Mesa, Ariz. Gov. Jan Brewer, who signed the bill, was in the audience. "I'll also complete the fence, I'll make sure we have enough Border Patrol agents to secure the fence, and I will make sure we have an E-Verify system and require employers to check the documents of workers," he added.
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NATIONAL
January 5, 2014 | By Cindy Carcamo
TUCSON - A federal judge has given opponents of Arizona's sweeping anti-illegal-immigration law access to emails, letters and memos between supporters of SB 1070 and legislators to see whether there are racial overtones in the messages. In December, U.S. District Judge Susan Bolton in Phoenix rejected arguments made by two of the law's supporters, who maintained that communications sent to lawmakers who created and supported SB 1070 were confidential. Challengers to SB 1070 called Bolton's ruling a victory because their lawsuit was based partly on allegations that legislators meant to discriminate against Latinos and other people of color.
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NEWS
June 25, 2012 | By David Savage, This post has been updated, as indicated below.
WASHINGTON -- The U.S. Supreme Court struck down most of Arizona's strict law targeting illegal immigrants, but said Arizona's police can stop, question and briefly detain immigrants if they have reason to believe they are in the country illegally. The justices said the federal government has the ultimate authority to decide who will be held on immigration charges and deported.   While police can stop people they suspect are illegal immigrants, the justices said the police have limited authority.
NATIONAL
February 18, 2013 | By Cindy Carcamo, Los Angeles Times
TUCSON - It's routine for immigration officials in Arizona to detain people suspected of being in the country illegally. Monday, however, the detention of two men - an immigrant rights activist and a father of six in Tucson - sparked protests, frustrated local authorities and illustrated the difficulties of complying with SB 1070, the state's controversial immigration enforcement law. "This is unjust," Alma Hernandez yelled in Spanish to...
NATIONAL
April 28, 2010 | By Peter Nicholas, Tribune Washington Bureau
President Obama on Wednesday dismissed Arizona's tough new anti-immigration law as a "shortcut" that will merely inflame the debate "instead of solving the problem." In an impromptu session with reporters at the back of his plane, Obama described the law as a product of "people's frustrations about the border." Although the president sympathized in part, saying we now have "hundreds of thousands of people coming in" who are "not playing by the rules," he said Arizona had chosen the wrong approach.
NATIONAL
February 18, 2013 | By Cindy Carcamo, Los Angeles Times
TUCSON - It's routine for immigration officials in Arizona to detain people suspected of being in the country illegally. Monday, however, the detention of two men - an immigrant rights activist and a father of six in Tucson - sparked protests, frustrated local authorities and illustrated the difficulties of complying with SB 1070, the state's controversial immigration enforcement law. "This is unjust," Alma Hernandez yelled in Spanish to...
NATIONAL
May 26, 2011 | By David G. Savage, Washington Bureau
The Supreme Court gave a big boost to proponents of stricter state laws against illegal immigration by upholding Arizona's "business death penalty" for employers who repeatedly hire undocumented workers. The 5-3 ruling gives more states a green light to target those who employ illegal immigrants. And because it rejected the contention that the state was interfering with the federal government's authority over immigration, the decision also encouraged supporters of Arizona's even more controversial immigration law. That law, which requires police to check the immigration status of people they lawfully stop and who they suspect are in the country illegally, will soon come before the court.
NATIONAL
April 21, 2012 | By David G. Savage, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON — The Supreme Court and the Obama administration are set for another politically charged clash Wednesday as the justices take up Arizona's tough crackdown on illegal immigrants. It will be a rematch of the attorneys who argued the healthcare case a month ago, and another chapter in the partisan philosophical struggle over states' rights and the role of the federal government. And once again, President Obama's lawyers are likely to face skeptical questions from the high court.
NATIONAL
April 12, 2011 | By Nicholas Riccardi, Los Angeles Times
A federal appellate court Monday upheld a judge's ban on the most controversial parts of a tough new Arizona immigration law, setting the stage for a showdown before the Supreme Court on how far a state can go in trying to expel illegal immigrants. A three-judge panel of the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals agreed with a federal judge in Arizona who found that provisions of the law, known as SB 1070, were an unconstitutional intrusion into immigration and foreign policy, which is the prerogative of the federal government.
NATIONAL
July 2, 2010 | By Nicholas Riccardi, Los Angeles Times
Police officers enforcing a controversial new Arizona immigration law cannot use race to form a suspicion that someone is in the country illegally, but can rely on people's ability to speak English, their dress and whether they are in an area where illegal immigrants congregate, according to state guidelines released Thursday. The 90-minute training DVD and accompanying paperwork will be distributed to 15,000 law enforcement officers statewide charged with enforcing the sweeping new law, which is scheduled to take effect July 29. The law requires police to determine the status of people they stop who they suspect are in the country illegally, and makes it a misdemeanor to lack proper immigration documents in Arizona.
NATIONAL
December 23, 2012 | By Cindy Carcamo, Los Angeles Times
TUCSON - Tourism officials here have long lured visitors and their dollars to the region with images of fantastic desert sunsets, wellness resorts and endless nature trails. But to entice their most prized foreign visitors, they tout great shopping at good prices. Louis Vuitton, Dillard's and Apple attract Tucson's neighbors in Mexico, who account for nearly 68% of its international tourists. For decades, millions of Mexican shoppers from neighboring Sonora and Sinaloa have trekked to Arizona for a full day, and sometimes a long weekend, dedicated to buying clothes, electronics and other goods.
OPINION
June 27, 2012
Re "Arizona's police chiefs see an enforcement headache," June 26 Why do many Arizona police chiefs see enforcement of SB 1070, the state's tough immigration law, as "a headache"? Because of the new level of scrutiny? Because they are not going to be allowed to perform racial profiling without theU.S. Supreme Courtvoiding the final valid part of the state's odious immigration law? Thousands more immigrants have been prevented from staying in America under President Obama than under the Bush administration, yet Arizona Gov. Jan Brewer's entire premise for enacting the law was that the federal government was not doing enough to protect Arizona's borders.
NATIONAL
June 27, 2012 | By Paloma Esquivel, Los Angeles Times
PHOENIX - If I'm traveling with other Latinos in a carpool will I be stopped? Will you accept my Mexican-issued ID? If I witness a crime, should I call the police? One by one, Phoenix Police Chief Daniel Garcia tried to reassure the questioners gathered at a Phoenix high school, saying repeatedly that people would not be detained without reason under Arizona's landmark immigration law. Across the state, the law's "show me your papers" provision upheld by the Supreme Court has created confusion and anxiety, and moved Latinos - both legal and illegal residents - to ask an overriding question: How can you promise we won't be singled out because of how we look?
ENTERTAINMENT
June 27, 2012 | By Meredith Blake
On Monday the Supreme Court rejected most, though not all, of the key provisions of the controversial immigration laws passed two years ago in Arizona. While the split decision left both sides claiming victory, on Tuesday night Stephen Colbert took a more pessimistic view. He claimed the ruling was disastrous “partly because it throws open our country's borders, but mostly because Mitt Romney now has to express an opinion that will upset Hispanic voters” - a dig at the candidate's reputation for evasiveness.
NATIONAL
June 26, 2012 | By Paloma Esquivel
PHOENIX -- Soon after the Supreme Court handed down its ruling on Arizona's landmark immigration law, Gov. Jan Brewer said she believed the controversial “show me your papers” provision of the law could immediately go into effect . That doesn't seem to be the case. Legal experts cautioned Tuesday that the provision cannot be implemented until an injunction imposed by a lower court is lifted. “It's going to happen, and it's going to happen reasonably quickly,” said Dan Pochoda, legal director at the ACLU of Arizona.
OPINION
June 26, 2012
The Supreme Court made the right decision Monday when it struck down three of the central provisions in Arizona's noxious immigration law as unconstitutional intrusions into the federal government's exclusive authority to regulate the issue. The 5-3 ruling helps reaffirm what should have long been clear to Arizona policymakers: that immigration cannot be addressed through a patchwork of state laws, each with its own view of who should be detained and deported and how. Supporters of SB 1070 have spent two years arguing that it doesn't conflict with but rather complements federal law. Yet even the conservative-dominated Supreme Court begs to differ.
NEWS
June 25, 2012 | By Kathleen Hennessey
WASHINGTON -- President Obama said he's “pleased” with the U.S. Supreme Court decision knocking down parts of Arizona's controversial immigration law, and he quickly used the decision to call for comprehensive immigration reform and to tout his own recent move to curb deportations. “A patchwork of state laws is not a solution to our broken immigration system -- it's part of the problem,” Obama said in a statement. While the court's ruling was not a clean sweep for the administration, it was strong enough for the president to claim victory and try to score some political points.
NATIONAL
June 25, 2012 | By David G. Savage, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - The federal government, not states, holds responsibility for enforcing immigration laws, theU.S. Supreme Courtruled, striking down three key parts of Arizona's crackdown on illegal immigrants and jeopardizing similar laws in five other states. The justices did clear the way Monday for Arizona to begin enforcing another controversial part of its law, which directs police to check the immigration status of people they suspect are in the country illegally when they make lawful stops for other reasons.
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