Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsArizona Law
IN THE NEWS

Arizona Law

FEATURED ARTICLES
NATIONAL
March 12, 2013 | By Cindy Carcamo
TUCSON - An Arizona law that put an end to ethnic studies courses in Tucson schools has been largely upheld as constitutional by a federal judge, but supporters of the program say their legal fight to restore the program will continue. U.S. Circuit Court Judge Wallace Tashima on Friday found most of the law that bans public schools from teaching certain race-related courses, such as Mexican American studies, constitutional with one small exception. Tashima ruled that the portion of the law that prohibits courses designed for certain ethnic groups was unconstitutionally vague.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NATIONAL
February 25, 2014 | By Paresh Dave
As Arizona awaits its governor's decision on a religious freedom bill cast by critics as anti-gay, civil rights advocates in Indiana bashed its state's own foray into controversial legislation: A measure that would exempt many faith-based organizations from a law that prevents religious discrimination in employment decisions. But while the furor grew in Arizona, Indiana lawmakers quickly nixed their measure Tuesday. "The amendment is dead,” said Republican caucus spokeswoman Tory Flynn.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
May 9, 2012 | By Michelle Maltais
Trolls, you can breathe easy. Your annoying and offensive comments won't get you arrested in Arizona quite yet. Arizona lawmakers have amended the amendment to the telephone-harassment section of the state's anti-stalking law so that it no longer says it's illegal "for any person, with intent to terrify, intimidate, threaten, harass, annoy or offend, to use any electronic or digital device and use any obscene, lewd or profane language or...
NATIONAL
January 13, 2014 | By David G. Savage and Richard A. Serrano
WASHINGTON - The Supreme Court's refusal Monday to revive an Arizona law that largely banned abortions after 20 weeks put off for at least another year a clear constitutional ruling on whether conservative states may adopt new restrictions on women seeking to end their pregnancies. The decision, marking the third time this term that justices have declined to take up an abortion case, suggested the closely split court is not anxious to jump into the divide between red states and blue states over abortion rights.
NEWS
June 17, 2013 | By David G. Savage
WASHINGTON - The Supreme Court threw out an Arizona law Monday and by a surprisingly lopsided vote, ruling state officials may not demand a proof of citizenship from residents who register to vote. The 7-2 decision written by Justice Antonin Scalia said this “proof of citizenship” requirement conflicts with the national Motor Voter Act. The measure said states must “accept and use” a simple registration form when filled out by residents who are registering to vote. Scalia insists on closely following the words of the law, and in this instance, the words of the federal measure were clear in their meaning, he said.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 2, 2010 | By Reed Johnson, Los Angeles Times
Four summers ago, a handful of Spanish-speaking radio disc jockeys encouraged hundreds of thousands of Latino marchers to the streets of Los Angeles and other cities to support immigration reform. Now, in what is partially a sign of the growing clout of U.S. Latinos both as voters and cultural consumers, a number of prominent artists, both Latino and non-Latino, are urging fans to protest Arizona's controversial new statute that requires law enforcement officials to determine the status of people they suspect are illegal immigrants.
NATIONAL
June 18, 2013 | By Maura Dolan
SAN FRANCISCO -- A federal appeals court decided 2-1 on Tuesday to uphold an Arizona law that denies bail to immigrants who entered or remain in the country without documentation if they are arrested in connection with a felony. The ruling by the U.S. 9thCircuit Court of Appeals upheld Arizona's Proposition 100, a ballot measure passed 78% to 22% in 2006 to create bail exceptions for immigrants in the U.S. illegally. Two immigrants who were denied bail challenged the law in a class-action lawsuit.
OPINION
July 8, 2010
In filing its long-awaited suit to block implementation of Arizona's harsh new immigration law, the Justice Department has taken a necessary step to reassert federal authority over immigration enforcement. The Obama administration rightly argues that states cannot be permitted to concoct their own rules and regulations on this issue to suit local needs and local politics, no matter how frustrated they are with the federal government. Allowing states to do so would result in a mishmash of laws handicapping Washington's ability to do its job. Arizona officials have argued that the state is merely seeking to enforce federal law. But that's not quite right.
NATIONAL
July 12, 2010 | Katherine Skiba, Tribune Washington Bureau
Atty. Gen. Eric H. Holder Jr. said Sunday he might sue Arizona a second time if its new tough-on-illegal-immigrants law leads to racial profiling. The nation's top law enforcement officer said the federal government's lawsuit against Arizona, filed last week, made scant mention of racial profiling because it focused on the stronger argument that the state law preempted the federal government's responsibility in deciding immigration policies. The Arizona law requires police to check the immigration status of people who are stopped for other reasons if they are "reasonably suspected" of being in the country illegally.
NATIONAL
August 22, 2013 | By Maura Dolan
SAN FRANCISCO -- An Arizona law barring Medicaid patients from obtaining routine care from medical providers who perform elective abortions violates federal requirements and may not be enforced, a federal appeals court decided unanimously Thursday. A three-judge panel of the U.S. 9 th Circuit Court of Appeals upheld a permanent injunction against the 2012 law ,  which Planned Parenthood of Arizona challenged before it could be enforced. The law prohibited low income recipients of Medicaid from receiving coverage for family planning services from clinics that provided abortions for reasons other than medical necessity, rape or incest.
NATIONAL
January 5, 2014 | By Cindy Carcamo
TUCSON - A federal judge has given opponents of Arizona's sweeping anti-illegal-immigration law access to emails, letters and memos between supporters of SB 1070 and legislators to see whether there are racial overtones in the messages. In December, U.S. District Judge Susan Bolton in Phoenix rejected arguments made by two of the law's supporters, who maintained that communications sent to lawmakers who created and supported SB 1070 were confidential. Challengers to SB 1070 called Bolton's ruling a victory because their lawsuit was based partly on allegations that legislators meant to discriminate against Latinos and other people of color.
NATIONAL
November 1, 2013 | By Cindy Carcamo
TUCSON - A ballot measure to overturn a Republican-backed state bill that made sweeping changes to Arizona election law was certified this week as having more than enough valid signatures, but on Friday opponents vowed to challenge those signatures in court. The effort to block the measure is the latest round in a growing fight in Arizona that revolves around voter participation and allegations of fraud. Democrats contend that the Republican-led Legislature passed the measure in June as part of a bigger movement to make it more difficult for minorities to vote and third-party candidates to run in the state.
NATIONAL
October 12, 2013 | By Cindy Carcamo
PAYSON, Utah - There's a good chance that the fresh tart cherries Southern Californians find at their grocers originated from Robert McMullin's orchards at the base of the Wasatch Mountains. The third-generation farmer provides 90% of the fresh sour cherries found in Southern California. The hard-to-find fruit is prized by bakers and cooks. McMullin shook his head when he recalled how much fruit went unpicked during this year's July harvest. "We lost $300,000 on that deal because we didn't have enough guys to pick," he said.
NATIONAL
October 8, 2013 | By Cindy Carcamo
An Arizona plan to tighten voter registration would create a two-tiered voting system in time for next year's elections but affect only several thousand people, some of whom could be denied participation in state and local elections, state officials said Tuesday. Voting rights activists, however, said that many more eligible voters probably would choose not to participate because of confusion over the new plan, which is expected to be challenged in court. The new system will essentially have separate voter rolls.
NATIONAL
October 7, 2013 | By Cindy Carcamo
Arizona plans to require proof of citizenship to vote in statewide races, officials announced Monday, even though the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that voters needn't show such documentation when registering to vote with a federal form. In June, the court struck down an Arizona law requiring people registering to vote with federal forms to submit proof of citizenship. Currently, only about 5% of prospective voters register using federal forms; about 95% use state forms. On the federal form, the applicant must swear under penalty of perjury that he or she is a citizen.
NATIONAL
October 7, 2013 | By Cindy Carcamo
An Arizona law that makes it a crime to beg for money or food in public is unconstitutional, a federal judge has ruled. The decision comes in response to a lawsuit filed by the American Civil Liberties Union of Arizona against the city of Flagstaff, which has drawn national attention for its aggressive stance on panhandling by jailing some violators. Last month, the city changed course after the ACLU sued on behalf of a 77-year-old woman who had been arrested when she asked an undercover police officer for bus fare.
NATIONAL
December 27, 2011 | By Stephen Ceasar, Los Angeles Times
Tucson's Mexican American studies program violates state law, an Arizona administrative law judge ruled Tuesday, paving the way for the program's possible demise. Judge Lewis D. Kowal affirmed a prior decision by the state's schools chief that the Tucson Unified School District's program violates a new law prohibiting divisive ethnic-studies classes. John Huppenthal, the state superintendent of public instruction, had deemed the program in violation in June. Among other things, the law bans classes primarily designed for a particular ethnic group or that "promote resentment toward a race or class of people.
NEWS
April 25, 2012 | By David G. Savage
WASHINGTON - In what is shaping up as Round 2 for the Supreme Court and President Obama, the justices are hearing a highly charged clash over Arizona's planned crackdown on illegal immigrants and the administration's effort to block it. Obama's lawyers won in lower courts in Phoenix and San Francisco, but the high court is considering Arizona's appeal during oral arguments. It is a rematch for the two attorneys who argued in last month's constitutional challenge to Obama's healthcare law. This time, the issue is whether the federal government's traditional control over immigration prevents states such as Arizona from authorizing their police to stop and arrest suspected illegal aliens.
NATIONAL
September 24, 2013 | By Cindy Carcamo
FLAGSTAFF, Ariz. - An Arizona city that led the nation in its aggressive stance on panhandling reversed course Tuesday night, setting in motion the apparent demise of a century-old state law that criminalized begging. The Flagstaff City Council voted to settle a lawsuit launched this summer by the American Civil Liberties Union of Arizona on behalf of a 77-year-old woman who had been arrested after asking an undercover police officer for bus fare. The ACLU argued that the state law and Flagstaff's enforcement of it were unconstitutional.
NATIONAL
August 22, 2013 | By Maura Dolan
SAN FRANCISCO -- An Arizona law barring Medicaid patients from obtaining routine care from medical providers who perform elective abortions violates federal requirements and may not be enforced, a federal appeals court decided unanimously Thursday. A three-judge panel of the U.S. 9 th Circuit Court of Appeals upheld a permanent injunction against the 2012 law ,  which Planned Parenthood of Arizona challenged before it could be enforced. The law prohibited low income recipients of Medicaid from receiving coverage for family planning services from clinics that provided abortions for reasons other than medical necessity, rape or incest.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|