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NEWS
May 23, 1992 | DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The idea has become a fixture of Bill Clinton's campaign: "All my life, I have been an agent of change," he says. As Arkansas governor, he tells audiences around the nation, "I have taken on the entrenched interests" to fight for change. And, indeed, Clinton's five terms as his state's chief executive, covering 12 of the last 14 years, have brought considerable change to Arkansas, particularly in two crucial areas for a poor Southern state--race relations and education.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 20, 1994 | J. MICHAEL KENNEDY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For Paula Jones, a beachside apartment in Long Beach has become a self-imposed fortress, a place whose locked gates keep prying eyes away from the woman who has sued the President of the United States. The voice with a syrupy Southern drawl came over the intercom of the apartment complex. "I have nothing to say," said the voice from the box. "I can't say anything. You'll have to talk to my lawyer."
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NEWS
September 5, 1992 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Labor Secretary Lynn Martin has looked into the Arkansas economy and doesn't like what she saw: a grim backwater of dead-end jobs and low living standards. Health and Human Services Secretary Louis W. Sullivan has inspected Arkansas' health care system and declares that it's in woeful shape. And Michael Deland, chairman of the President's Council on Environmental Quality, says Arkansas is "at the bottom of the heap" in environmental programs.
NEWS
September 5, 1992 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Labor Secretary Lynn Martin has looked into the Arkansas economy and doesn't like what she saw: a grim backwater of dead-end jobs and low living standards. Health and Human Services Secretary Louis W. Sullivan has inspected Arkansas' health care system and declares that it's in woeful shape. And Michael Deland, chairman of the President's Council on Environmental Quality, says Arkansas is "at the bottom of the heap" in environmental programs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 20, 1994 | J. MICHAEL KENNEDY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For Paula Jones, a beachside apartment in Long Beach has become a self-imposed fortress, a place whose locked gates keep prying eyes away from the woman who has sued the President of the United States. The voice with a syrupy Southern drawl came over the intercom of the apartment complex. "I have nothing to say," said the voice from the box. "I can't say anything. You'll have to talk to my lawyer."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 11, 1998 | CHRISTOPHER REED, Christopher Reed is Western U.S. correspondent for the Guardian of London
Perhaps I really am the last unreconstructed lefty in Southern California, if the pitiful lack of attention devoted to a left perspective on the Clinton impeachment is any guide. My position is that his treachery of even his own watery liberalism is so blatant that if sexual betrayal provokes his downfall, so be it. The president is devious and dishonest on so many counts that the argument advanced by others on the left that the "blue noses" must not win does not work.
NEWS
March 11, 1998 | DAVID WILLMAN and CECILIA BALLI, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Prosecutors on Tuesday sought again to test the truthfulness of recent sworn testimony from President Clinton, questioning before a federal grand jury another woman whose path has crossed his. The witness, former White House volunteer Kathleen E. Willey, made no public comments regarding her testimony. In an apparent signal that she is not hostile to the investigation, Willey arrived at and departed the courthouse in the company of the staff of independent counsel Kenneth W. Starr.
NEWS
May 27, 1998 | DAVID WILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Prosecutors have summoned Monica S. Lewinsky to provide them with fingerprints, samples of hair and a recording of her voice--and the former White House intern will comply, a spokeswoman said Tuesday. According to people familiar with the investigation, Lewinsky is scheduled to provide the new evidence this morning to representatives of independent counsel Kenneth W. Starr at the federal building in West Los Angeles.
NEWS
March 3, 1998 | DAVID WILLMAN and ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A federal judge is preparing to rule on an extraordinary effort by independent counsel Kenneth W. Starr to obtain notes, case files and even diary entries of Monica S. Lewinsky's former lawyer. Despite the legal privilege that normally protects the confidentiality of communications between attorneys and their clients, Starr also is seeking potentially to question the lawyer, Francis D. Carter, before a federal grand jury. It was Carter who helped prepare the affidavit Lewinsky signed on Jan.
NEWS
May 15, 1998 | DAVID WILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Independent counsel Kenneth W. Starr urged a federal judge Thursday to force Secret Service officials to answer questions that he said are "highly relevant" to determining whether President Clinton or others in the Monica S. Lewinsky investigation have testified falsely, intimidated witnesses or obstructed justice.
NEWS
May 23, 1992 | DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The idea has become a fixture of Bill Clinton's campaign: "All my life, I have been an agent of change," he says. As Arkansas governor, he tells audiences around the nation, "I have taken on the entrenched interests" to fight for change. And, indeed, Clinton's five terms as his state's chief executive, covering 12 of the last 14 years, have brought considerable change to Arkansas, particularly in two crucial areas for a poor Southern state--race relations and education.
NEWS
June 10, 1998 | DAVID WILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Less than a week after taking over the defense of their high-profile client, lawyers for former White House intern Monica S. Lewinsky conferred for several hours on Tuesday with top deputies of independent counsel Kenneth W. Starr. The session indicates that both Starr's office and Lewinsky's newly hired lawyers--Jacob A. Stein and Plato Cacheris--are quickly identifying what it will take to complete an immunity deal, according to lawyers familiar with the matter.
NEWS
March 13, 1998 | DAVID WILLMAN and MARC LACEY and CECILIA BALLI, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Two witnesses with divergent roles in the White House hierarchy made return visits Thursday to the federal grand jury examining the nature of dealings between President Clinton and a former intern. The aides appearing before the grand jury--Deputy Counsel Bruce R. Lindsey and a valet, Bayani B. Nelvis--are important witnesses because they were well-positioned to shed light on whether Clinton testified truthfully regarding the former intern, Monica S. Lewinsky.
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