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NEWS
April 25, 1990 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Supreme Court ruled Tuesday that a condemned killer can gain his wish and be put to death without having his case appealed. But this 7-2 ruling has only minimal impact, since Arkansas is the only state which does not require that a death sentence automatically be reviewed by its highest state court. On Dec. 28, 1987, Ronald Gene Simmons went on a rampage in Russellville, Ark., randomly shooting and killing two persons and wounding three others.
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NATIONAL
March 14, 2014 | By Joseph Serna
A federal judge has struck down a portion of a law in Arkansas that bans most abortions after 12 weeks of pregnancy, reasoning that the fetus' viability, not heartbeat, determines the legality of such procedures. At issue was an Arkansas law passed last March that said a woman could not receive an abortion beyond 12 weeks if the fetus had a heartbeat, except in cases of rape, incest, if the woman's life was in danger or if the fetus had a highly lethal disorder. U.S. District Judge Susan Webber Wright ruled that viability - or the fetus' ability to survive outside the womb - was the determining factor in abortion law and that Arkansas' law was therefore unconstitutional.
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NEWS
February 20, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Daisy Bates, the civil rights pioneer behind the nine black students who broke the color barrier in Little Rock schools in 1957, will be honored with a state holiday. Gov. Mike Huckabee signed legislation to honor Bates on the third Monday in February. Beginning next year, residents will honor her while at the same time observing Presidents Day. Bates, who died two years ago at age 84, became a national symbol of black hope and a target of segregationist hate during the 1950s.
NEWS
March 7, 2013 | By Dan Turner
The approval by Arkansas' Legislature on Wednesday of the nation's most restrictive abortion law raises a lot of questions. No, I don't mean the usual questions about when life begins or whether the government has a right to intrude in such an intensely personal decision; I don't presume to be able to answer those, nor could anybody do so in a way that would satisfy true believers on the other side. Mine are reserved for the state legislators: Have you guys really thought this thing through?
NEWS
March 24, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
A judge in Little Rock threw out Arkansas' anti-sodomy law, saying it unfairly singles out homosexuals for prosecution. No one has been prosecuted under the 1977 law, but seven homosexuals brought a lawsuit challenging the law, saying they feared being charged and convicted and losing their jobs or professional licenses.
NEWS
September 25, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
A federal appeals court in St. Paul, Minn., declared as unconstitutional laws barring late-term abortions in Nebraska, Iowa and Arkansas. A three-judge panel of the U.S. 8th Circuit Court of Appeals upheld a decision by a federal judge in Lincoln, Neb., that said Nebraska's law had the potential for barring all abortions. The ruling encompassed similar anti-abortion statutes in Iowa and Arkansas.
NEWS
November 14, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
A federal judge in Little Rock struck down an Arkansas law that banned late-term abortions. Magistrate Jerry Cavaneau said the 1997 law was so vague and broadly written that it effectively banned all abortions. Cavaneau said the ban "imposes an undue burden on women seeking abortion." A Little Rock abortion clinic and four doctors who perform abortions had sued to stop the law from taking effect.
NEWS
August 23, 1989 | From Associated Press
Delinquent parents here no longer face humiliation in a stockade, but those who don't keep their kids in line can still draw hefty fines and time in jail. The City Council on Monday revised a 2-week-old ordinance, leaving a provision that parents of wayward youngsters could be sentenced to up to 30 days in jail, but deleting the part that said two of those days could be spent on public display in a stockade. The law didn't define a stockade.
NEWS
November 19, 1991 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
Pregnant at 15, Kinesha T. doesn't need much imagination to envision the life that looms ahead of her. Her older sister, living with an aunt, is on welfare with her baby. Her cousin, at 21, already has six children, is contemplating a seventh, and seems sentenced to a life measured from welfare check to welfare check. Wisconsin's Gov. Tommy G. Thompson, a Republican in his second term, thinks he knows how to point Kinesha in a different direction.
NEWS
September 9, 1994 | from Associated Press
State-imposed congressional term limits threaten the election system, the Clinton Administration said in its first official word on the volatile campaign issue. Supporters of limits said the opposition "will come back to haunt the President." The Administration's position is stated in an Aug. 31 request filed by Solicitor General Drew S. Days III seeking permission to participate in Supreme Court oral arguments over the validity of an Arkansas term-limits measure.
NATIONAL
December 4, 2008 | Bonnie Miller Rubin, Rubin writes for the Chicago Tribune.
Anne Shelley and Robin Ross are unwinding after a jam-packed day of ferrying 4-year-old daughter Eva Mae from preschool to ice skating lessons to speech therapy. "It's pretty much your mundane American family," said Shelley, 46, over a dinner of barbecue at their home near the Ozark Mountains. But not everyone sees their domestic situation that way.
NEWS
March 24, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
A judge in Little Rock threw out Arkansas' anti-sodomy law, saying it unfairly singles out homosexuals for prosecution. No one has been prosecuted under the 1977 law, but seven homosexuals brought a lawsuit challenging the law, saying they feared being charged and convicted and losing their jobs or professional licenses.
NEWS
February 20, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Daisy Bates, the civil rights pioneer behind the nine black students who broke the color barrier in Little Rock schools in 1957, will be honored with a state holiday. Gov. Mike Huckabee signed legislation to honor Bates on the third Monday in February. Beginning next year, residents will honor her while at the same time observing Presidents Day. Bates, who died two years ago at age 84, became a national symbol of black hope and a target of segregationist hate during the 1950s.
NEWS
January 20, 2001 | ERIC LICHTBLAU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a dramatic punctuation to his tumultuous presidency, President Clinton struck a deal Friday ensuring that he will not be criminally prosecuted for making false statements about his affair with Monica S. Lewinsky. Clinton, in a surprise deal reached with independent counsel Robert W.
NEWS
September 25, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
A federal appeals court in St. Paul, Minn., declared as unconstitutional laws barring late-term abortions in Nebraska, Iowa and Arkansas. A three-judge panel of the U.S. 8th Circuit Court of Appeals upheld a decision by a federal judge in Lincoln, Neb., that said Nebraska's law had the potential for barring all abortions. The ruling encompassed similar anti-abortion statutes in Iowa and Arkansas.
NEWS
November 14, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
A federal judge in Little Rock struck down an Arkansas law that banned late-term abortions. Magistrate Jerry Cavaneau said the 1997 law was so vague and broadly written that it effectively banned all abortions. Cavaneau said the ban "imposes an undue burden on women seeking abortion." A Little Rock abortion clinic and four doctors who perform abortions had sued to stop the law from taking effect.
NATIONAL
March 14, 2014 | By Joseph Serna
A federal judge has struck down a portion of a law in Arkansas that bans most abortions after 12 weeks of pregnancy, reasoning that the fetus' viability, not heartbeat, determines the legality of such procedures. At issue was an Arkansas law passed last March that said a woman could not receive an abortion beyond 12 weeks if the fetus had a heartbeat, except in cases of rape, incest, if the woman's life was in danger or if the fetus had a highly lethal disorder. U.S. District Judge Susan Webber Wright ruled that viability - or the fetus' ability to survive outside the womb - was the determining factor in abortion law and that Arkansas' law was therefore unconstitutional.
NEWS
March 7, 2013 | By Dan Turner
The approval by Arkansas' Legislature on Wednesday of the nation's most restrictive abortion law raises a lot of questions. No, I don't mean the usual questions about when life begins or whether the government has a right to intrude in such an intensely personal decision; I don't presume to be able to answer those, nor could anybody do so in a way that would satisfy true believers on the other side. Mine are reserved for the state legislators: Have you guys really thought this thing through?
NEWS
September 9, 1994 | from Associated Press
State-imposed congressional term limits threaten the election system, the Clinton Administration said in its first official word on the volatile campaign issue. Supporters of limits said the opposition "will come back to haunt the President." The Administration's position is stated in an Aug. 31 request filed by Solicitor General Drew S. Days III seeking permission to participate in Supreme Court oral arguments over the validity of an Arkansas term-limits measure.
NEWS
November 24, 1991 | JAMES JEFFERSON, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Bill Wilkie is indignant. For years, he has dug up Indian artifacts for his collection; he used to sell pieces he found. Now the state is telling Wilkie and other amateur archeologists that they can't dig everywhere, and they can't do it for profit. "If it's not right for me to go out an dig up an Indian, it's not right for anyone to go out and dig up an Indian. And it's ridiculous for me not to be able to sell a piece of pottery," Wilkie said.
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