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ENTERTAINMENT
March 8, 2002 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Big Bad Love" is a calculated risk that succeeds in evoking what it means to be a fiction writer as few films have. Shot through with beauty, pain and humor, this complex and intimate film is drawn from the short story collection of the same name by Mississippi writer Larry Brown. It stars Arliss Howard as Brown alter ego Leon Barlow.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 8, 2002 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Big Bad Love" is a calculated risk that succeeds in evoking what it means to be a fiction writer as few films have. Shot through with beauty, pain and humor, this complex and intimate film is drawn from the short story collection of the same name by Mississippi writer Larry Brown. It stars Arliss Howard as Brown alter ego Leon Barlow.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 17, 1990 | DEVON O'BRIEN
Fishing for catfish and working in community theater--that's what Arliss Howard was up to in 1983, just before he auditioned for the TV movie "The Day After." ABC Circle Films was shooting in Kansas City, Mo., and meeting with local talent there. "I walked in and said, 'How you doin?' " Howard remembers, 'I think they were taken with my manners, 'cause I'm really polite. . . . They said, 'Read this.' And I read it, and I didn't make any mistakes."
ENTERTAINMENT
March 3, 2002 | MICHELE WILLENS
She may be well versed in Tolstoy and James Agee these days, but Debra Winger would still feel just fine taking a ride on that mechanical bull. Debra Winger--remember her? If your memory span is short or you're under say, 30, you have every right not to. She was last on the screen in the very forgettable "Forget Paris" opposite Billy Crystal. That was six years ago.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 22, 1988 | DAN SULLIVAN, Times Theater Critic
It's not that Sam Shepard can't write a tight single-action play. Think of "Fool for Love." But in "A Lie of the Mind" at the Mark Taper Forum he's writing about two families, and that's a story that takes time to tell. Some people were fretting Wednesday night at the length of the play, as staged by Robert Woodruff--just over three hours. (Some didn't stay to fret.) They'll be interested to hear that Shepard's original New York staging went on for almost four. That was ridiculous.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 3, 2002 | MICHELE WILLENS
She may be well versed in Tolstoy and James Agee these days, but Debra Winger would still feel just fine taking a ride on that mechanical bull. Debra Winger--remember her? If your memory span is short or you're under say, 30, you have every right not to. She was last on the screen in the very forgettable "Forget Paris" opposite Billy Crystal. That was six years ago.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 11, 1992 | MICHAEL WILMINGTON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"Crisscross" (citywide), set in 1969 during the days around the Apollo moon launch, captures something about that controversial decade almost perfectly. It's a mixed achievement: a small, movingly done human story swallowed up in a more conventional crime thriller. Yet, if it fails, it doesn't fail ignobly.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 16, 1992 | RAY LOYND
The metallic world of high-price call girls--especially one who thought she could quit--is dramatized in a coolly insidious portrait of marital betrayal, "Those Secrets" (at 9 tonight on ABC, Channels 7, 3, 10 and 42). Blair Brown, in a role that is as startling as it is devilishly calibrated, stars as a regal-looking wife whose happy marriage is torn apart by successive jolts.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 22, 1996 | LYNNE HEFFLEY
A film about a death row inmate and a good woman struggling for his redemption as they commune face-to-face through a barrier of safety mesh may sound familiar, but Showtime's lugubrious "Beyond the Call" is no "Dead Man Walking." David Strathairn plays Russell, a psychologically tortured man who is unable to convince authorities that his crimes of murder were the result to his Vietnam War-induced post-traumatic shock syndrome.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 20, 1993 | PETER RAINER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Just about everybody and everything connected to "Wilder Napalm" (selected theaters) is terrible, starting with that title. Don't expect a Vietnam movie. In fact, don't expect a movie. Wilder (Arliss Howard) and Wallace (Dennis Quaid) are estranged brothers in the Cain and Abel mold, with a Stephen King-ish twist. Both have pyro-kinetic powers--they can will fires into roaring life.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 17, 1990 | DEVON O'BRIEN
Fishing for catfish and working in community theater--that's what Arliss Howard was up to in 1983, just before he auditioned for the TV movie "The Day After." ABC Circle Films was shooting in Kansas City, Mo., and meeting with local talent there. "I walked in and said, 'How you doin?' " Howard remembers, 'I think they were taken with my manners, 'cause I'm really polite. . . . They said, 'Read this.' And I read it, and I didn't make any mistakes."
ENTERTAINMENT
January 22, 1988 | DAN SULLIVAN, Times Theater Critic
It's not that Sam Shepard can't write a tight single-action play. Think of "Fool for Love." But in "A Lie of the Mind" at the Mark Taper Forum he's writing about two families, and that's a story that takes time to tell. Some people were fretting Wednesday night at the length of the play, as staged by Robert Woodruff--just over three hours. (Some didn't stay to fret.) They'll be interested to hear that Shepard's original New York staging went on for almost four. That was ridiculous.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 1997 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There's a sentimental streak a mile wide in Scott Silver's "johns," but it's nonetheless engaging and poignant because David Arquette and Lukas Haas bring such vulnerability and likability to the Santa Monica Boulevard hustlers that Silver has written with such care and compassion. A tragicomic tale, "johns" is a minor film, but it fulfills its aspirations.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 8, 1990 | RAY LOYND
The final moments of the Death Row drama "Somebody Has to Shoot the Picture" (Sunday night at 9 on HBO) are graphic and unflinching. The subject is capital punishment, the viewpoint ridicules the death penalty, and the condemned man (Arliss Howard) is an uncanny portrait of quirky resignation. You'll remember him.
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