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Armand Hammer Foundation

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ENTERTAINMENT
November 18, 1991 | BETH KLEID, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Bootlegging: An administrator of Los Angeles' Armand Hammer Foundation is scheduled to stand trial in Minneapolis next month on charges alleging he smuggled $60,000 into the country--much of it in his cowboy boots. Scott R. Deitrick was arrested Oct. 11 and released five days later on a $250,000 cash bond posted by Michael Armand Hammer, grandson of the late Armand Hammer. Authorities allege Deitrick flew into the Minneapolis-St.
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OPINION
September 3, 1989
I write this letter as counsel to the Board of Directors of Occidental Petroleum Corp. in response to "Occidental, Not Hammer's Foundation, Purchased Art" (Part I, Aug. 18). You imply that Dr. (Armand) Hammer somehow unjustly benefits from his own philanthropy. This is wrong. Occidental and Dr. Hammer have a long-established history of promoting artistic and cultural endeavors. For years, Dr. Hammer and the Armand Hammer Foundation have loaned priceless masterpieces the world over, generating enormous good will to Occidental's benefit.
NEWS
May 16, 1992 | RHONDA HILLBERY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A federal jury on Friday acquitted Scott R. Deitrick, an administrator of the Armand Hammer Foundation in Los Angeles, of charges that he smuggled $60,000 in cash into the United States. Deitrick, 38, had been returning home to Los Angeles from London in October when he was arrested at Twin Cities International Airport. Customs agents discovered he was carrying the undeclared currency, most of it in his cowboy boots. Agents said he was confronted because he looked nervous.
NEWS
May 16, 1992 | RHONDA HILLBERY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A federal jury on Friday acquitted Scott R. Deitrick, an administrator of the Armand Hammer Foundation in Los Angeles, of charges that he smuggled $60,000 in cash into the United States. Deitrick, 38, had been returning home to Los Angeles from London in October when he was arrested at Twin Cities International Airport. Customs agents discovered he was carrying the undeclared currency, most of it in his cowboy boots. Agents said he was confronted because he looked nervous.
BUSINESS
May 26, 1991 | KATHY M. KRISTOF, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Waste not, want not," your mother used to say. But in some corners of corporate America, waste seems to have found a home. Company officers spend millions redecorating already lavish offices; executives are paid huge sums to relocate, only to quit their jobs a few months later; company executives are given massive bonuses to sign employment contracts so favorable that they would be crazy to pass them up.
BUSINESS
March 13, 1990 | ALLAN PARACHINI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Occidental Petroleum Corp. denied Monday that it had used corporate funds--beyond the $5.8 million it previously acknowledged--to finance art purchases for the private collection of its chairman, Armand Hammer. But the company acknowledged that it gave $12 million to the Armand Hammer Foundation, established by Hammer to support his charitable interests, over a seven-year period in which Hammer was building his art collection.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 30, 1990 | ALLAN PARACHINI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a move that may complicate the future of the controversial Armand Hammer Museum of Art and Cultural Center, the heir to the estate of Hammer's late wife is challenging the ownership of the industrialist's $250-million art collection. In a new Delaware court filing, Frances Hammer's niece Joan Weiss of Los Angeles claims that the estate may be "the owner of a substantial interest in the works of art" being donated to the museum now under construction in Westwood.
NEWS
August 18, 1989 | ALLAN PARACHINI, Times Staff Writer
Occidental Petroleum Corp.--and not the personal foundation of its chairman, Armand Hammer--paid $5 million to acquire an important collection of drawings by Leonardo da Vinci that was renamed in Hammer's honor and represented as part of his foundation's art collection, according to court documents unsealed Thursday. Books and brochures published by the Armand Hammer Foundation maintained that it had purchased the sketches in 1980 without mentioning Occidental's contribution.
NEWS
September 20, 1989 | ALLAN PARACHINI, Times Staff Writer
California's largest public employee pension plan has entered a bitter legal dispute between Occidental Petroleum Corp. and a small group of shareholders who contend that company funds have been improperly used to assemble Armand Hammer's art collection and build his new museum. The California Public Employees Retirement System, which holds 2.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 18, 1991 | BETH KLEID, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Bootlegging: An administrator of Los Angeles' Armand Hammer Foundation is scheduled to stand trial in Minneapolis next month on charges alleging he smuggled $60,000 into the country--much of it in his cowboy boots. Scott R. Deitrick was arrested Oct. 11 and released five days later on a $250,000 cash bond posted by Michael Armand Hammer, grandson of the late Armand Hammer. Authorities allege Deitrick flew into the Minneapolis-St.
BUSINESS
May 26, 1991 | KATHY M. KRISTOF, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Waste not, want not," your mother used to say. But in some corners of corporate America, waste seems to have found a home. Company officers spend millions redecorating already lavish offices; executives are paid huge sums to relocate, only to quit their jobs a few months later; company executives are given massive bonuses to sign employment contracts so favorable that they would be crazy to pass them up.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 30, 1990 | ALLAN PARACHINI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a move that may complicate the future of the controversial Armand Hammer Museum of Art and Cultural Center, the heir to the estate of Hammer's late wife is challenging the ownership of the industrialist's $250-million art collection. In a new Delaware court filing, Frances Hammer's niece Joan Weiss of Los Angeles claims that the estate may be "the owner of a substantial interest in the works of art" being donated to the museum now under construction in Westwood.
BUSINESS
March 13, 1990 | ALLAN PARACHINI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Occidental Petroleum Corp. denied Monday that it had used corporate funds--beyond the $5.8 million it previously acknowledged--to finance art purchases for the private collection of its chairman, Armand Hammer. But the company acknowledged that it gave $12 million to the Armand Hammer Foundation, established by Hammer to support his charitable interests, over a seven-year period in which Hammer was building his art collection.
NEWS
September 20, 1989 | ALLAN PARACHINI, Times Staff Writer
California's largest public employee pension plan has entered a bitter legal dispute between Occidental Petroleum Corp. and a small group of shareholders who contend that company funds have been improperly used to assemble Armand Hammer's art collection and build his new museum. The California Public Employees Retirement System, which holds 2.
OPINION
September 3, 1989
I write this letter as counsel to the Board of Directors of Occidental Petroleum Corp. in response to "Occidental, Not Hammer's Foundation, Purchased Art" (Part I, Aug. 18). You imply that Dr. (Armand) Hammer somehow unjustly benefits from his own philanthropy. This is wrong. Occidental and Dr. Hammer have a long-established history of promoting artistic and cultural endeavors. For years, Dr. Hammer and the Armand Hammer Foundation have loaned priceless masterpieces the world over, generating enormous good will to Occidental's benefit.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 14, 1994
Oilman Armand Hammer's wife was coerced into leaving her niece hundreds of millions of dollars in communal property in a rewritten will, a judge has ruled. Superior Court Judge Henry W. Shatford ruled that the bequest to Joan Weiss "was the product of threats, pressure and coercion and would not be enforced by the court," said Daniel Petrocelli, a lawyer for Hammer's estate and the Armand Hammer Foundation. The order, announced Tuesday, was signed Dec. 6.
NEWS
August 18, 1989 | ALLAN PARACHINI, Times Staff Writer
Occidental Petroleum Corp.--and not the personal foundation of its chairman, Armand Hammer--paid $5 million to acquire an important collection of drawings by Leonardo da Vinci that was renamed in Hammer's honor and represented as part of his foundation's art collection, according to court documents unsealed Thursday. Books and brochures published by the Armand Hammer Foundation maintained that it had purchased the sketches in 1980 without mentioning Occidental's contribution.
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