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Armando Alvarez

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HOME & GARDEN
August 11, 1990 | MIKE SPENCER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Don Marble, general manager of Villa Hallmark Furniture in Anaheim, isn't really sure how it all came about. All he knows is that the company was looking for a showstopper for this weekend's Restaurant, Hotel, International Design Exposition Conference (RHIDEC for the short of breath) in Los Angeles. And he's a little fuzzy on how--or why--that led to internationally acclaimed artist Armando Alvarez, known for his monumental acrylic canvases celebrating the environment.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 25, 2010 | By Veronica Rocha, Los Angeles Times
A Glendale police officer has been put on administrative leave after prosecutors charged him in an alleged off-duty road rage incident in Burbank. The Burbank city attorney's office filed the misdemeanor battery charge Dec. 10 against Glendale Police Officer Eric Ritter, who pleaded not guilty to striking Armando Alvarez, according to Los Angeles County Superior Court documents. Glendale city administrators placed the officer on leave, said Human Resources Director Matt Doyle.
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NEWS
February 25, 1989 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, Times Staff Writer
The day he died, Gustavo Alvarez Martinez awoke before dawn, entered his study and opened a Bible. Spreading his hands over a map of Honduras, he prayed for his people: "Blessed is the nation whose God is Jehovah." As military commander in chief from 1982 to 1984, Gen. Alvarez was a powerful U.S. ally who battled communism by force of arms. He waged a fierce counterinsurgency campaign at home, helped launch the war by U.S.
HOME & GARDEN
August 11, 1990 | MIKE SPENCER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Don Marble, general manager of Villa Hallmark Furniture in Anaheim, isn't really sure how it all came about. All he knows is that the company was looking for a showstopper for this weekend's Restaurant, Hotel, International Design Exposition Conference (RHIDEC for the short of breath) in Los Angeles. And he's a little fuzzy on how--or why--that led to internationally acclaimed artist Armando Alvarez, known for his monumental acrylic canvases celebrating the environment.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 25, 2010 | By Veronica Rocha, Los Angeles Times
A Glendale police officer has been put on administrative leave after prosecutors charged him in an alleged off-duty road rage incident in Burbank. The Burbank city attorney's office filed the misdemeanor battery charge Dec. 10 against Glendale Police Officer Eric Ritter, who pleaded not guilty to striking Armando Alvarez, according to Los Angeles County Superior Court documents. Glendale city administrators placed the officer on leave, said Human Resources Director Matt Doyle.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 14, 1987
A Cuban immigrant was shot and killed outside a Logan Heights cafe, police spokesman Rick Carlson said Friday. Armando Alvarez, 33, was shot shortly before 8:30 p.m. Thursday in the 300 block of Dewey Street during an argument with another man, who police believe is also a Cuban immigrant. Alvarez was taken by paramedics to UC San Diego Medical Center and he died a short time later, Carlson said. Police have only a sketchy description of the suspect in the slaying, Carlson said.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 21, 1988 | HILLIARD HARPER, San Diego County Arts Writer
Citing bureaucratic delays, David Avalos this week became the second artist to bow out from a Super Bowl-related temporary public art project. The problem: No city signatures on contracts. "I would think the city would be able to place a contract before the artist, and they've got a deal," Avalos said. But a city official estimated it will take two or three weeks for the government to sign off on the contract.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 19, 1994 | As told to STEPHANIE CHAVEZ / Times Education Writer
Give us attentive teachers. Challenge us more. Bring on more counselors because our lives are more messed up than you think. Take us out of the dark ages in math and science. Above all, listen to us. This is the blunt, ground-zero advice that members of the Class of 1994 have for the Los Angeles Unified School District. Before nearly 27,000 graduates stepped off the platform last week, The Times asked eight of them to reflect, in their own words, on the highs and lows of their education.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 16, 2001 | BRENDA REES, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Amid the majestic roars of lions and the shrill cries of monkeys, visitors to the Los Angeles Zoo will soon be hearing different animal noises: bleating goats, snorting pigs and braying donkeys. Those and other domestic animals are part of the new $3.4-million Winnick Family Children's Zoo that opens today, where kids will be able to learn more about their furry friends through theater, interactive play and up-close observations.
SPORTS
July 10, 1991 | RICH TOSCHES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The many friends and relatives of John Bray are pretty sure he's a boxer. They keep reading about him winning a decision in Seattle or knocking someone out in Europe or Oklahoma City or Colorado Springs. But in the past four years, as Bray rose through the ranks of amateur boxing to become the national heavyweight champion, his many followers in the Los Angeles area have never actually seen him fight.
NEWS
February 25, 1989 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, Times Staff Writer
The day he died, Gustavo Alvarez Martinez awoke before dawn, entered his study and opened a Bible. Spreading his hands over a map of Honduras, he prayed for his people: "Blessed is the nation whose God is Jehovah." As military commander in chief from 1982 to 1984, Gen. Alvarez was a powerful U.S. ally who battled communism by force of arms. He waged a fierce counterinsurgency campaign at home, helped launch the war by U.S.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 26, 1988 | HILLIARD HARPER, San Diego County Arts Writer
Having survived the penultimate cuts of the 1987 football season, both the Redskins and the Broncos will be lavishly paid for their efforts in Super Bowl XXII. Even the losers will toddle off the field with a fat check as a salve to bruised bodies and egos, a far better fate than the ultimate cut--decapitation--that once awaited selected participants in a pre-Columbian ball game.
NEWS
October 13, 1991 | ROBERT GLASS, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Anthropologist Ricardo Alegria earned a master's degree from the University of Chicago and a doctorate from Harvard, but one subject that always gave him trouble was English. "I personally was famous at the University of Puerto Rico for the many times I flunked English," he said. "Because I abandoned classes. I thought it was an imposition on me. It was stupid, but it was the attitude of many Puerto Ricans, that we thought of English as a political imposition."
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