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Armed Forces

OPINION
April 12, 2006 | MAX BOOT, MAX BOOT is a senior fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations.
RECENTLY, I HAPPENED to read two of the best military memoirs ever published: "Bugles and a Tiger" and "The Road Past Mandalay." Both were written by John Masters, a British officer with a literary flair who joined the Indian army in 1934, participated in one of the last imperial campaigns on the Northwest Frontier, invaded Iraq to overthrow a pro-German dictator in 1941 and then led a commando brigade operating behind Japanese lines in Burma.
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NEWS
September 24, 1991 | SAM FULWOOD III, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The move to cut the size of America's armed forces after the end of the Cold War is expected to narrow job opportunities sharply for a segment of American society that can least afford it: the nation's black youths. Although blacks make up only about 12% of the nation's population, they account for 20% of the armed forces and for 29% of the troops in the Army--the branch of the armed services that is likely to suffer most under the five-year cutback plan now on the books.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 19, 1987 | T.W. McGARRY, Times Staff Writer
The headquarters of most big American radio and television networks are high above the towered streets of New York. An exception--the biggest network of them all, geographically--stands on a nondescript boulevard in Sun Valley. The building is full of the usual monitor-crammed control rooms, but some of the engineers at the control boards are in camouflage fatigues or other military uniforms.
OPINION
January 31, 1993 | Tony Kushner, Tony Kushner is a playwright whose most recent work is "Angels in America. "
WHEN A member of an oppressed class becomes a successful arriviste, the lessons history teaches are often repressed as the price of membership to the ranks of the powerful and privileged. A moral giant like Thurgood Marshall chose not to avail himself of this expeditious amnesia.
NEWS
November 24, 1986 | MARK FINEMAN, Times Staff Writer
President Corazon Aquino survived the most explosive crisis of her nine-month-old administration Sunday, ridding her government of the chief challenger to her power and gaining an important vote of confidence from the nation's 200,000-strong armed forces.
NEWS
June 28, 1995 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin appeared certain of reversing a no-confidence vote by Parliament over his government's conduct of the war in Chechnya after pledging Tuesday to give lawmakers a bigger role in reforming the armed forces. He also sent Russian negotiators back to the tiny Chechen republic with broader authority to negotiate a political settlement of the 6 1/2-month-old war with separatist guerrillas.
NEWS
September 26, 1988 | MICHAEL PARKS, Times Staff Writer
The Soviet general staff on Sunday announced plans to declassify broad information about the composition, strength and equipment of the country's armed forces in an effort to promote public discussion of defense issues, long a taboo subject. Col. Gen. Makhmut A. Gareyev, deputy chief of the general staff, said that the partial lifting of the country's tight military censorship stems from the policy of glasnost, or openness, that is a key element of current reforms under Mikhail S.
NEWS
November 15, 1996 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Leonel Fernandez shocked his nation this month by forcibly retiring two dozen generals, encouraging his defense minister to submit to questioning by the civilian attorney general, then firing the defense minister for insubordination--all in a single week. Dominicans braced for a military reaction. Nothing happened.
WORLD
December 21, 2002 | T. Christian Miller, Times Staff Writer
Gen. Raul Baduel is a picture of calm. The commander of Venezuela's most powerful military force sits behind a large dark wood desk surrounded by Virgin Mary statues and Buddhist prayer strips. The smell of patchouli fills the air. Gregorian chant music floats ethereally. Today's military, he said at a base here, is different from the one that launched a coup against President Hugo Chavez eight months ago.
NEWS
January 18, 1992 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bemoaning the dissolution of the Soviet Union, more than 5,000 military officers demanded Friday that the former Soviet armed forces remain unified and battle-ready under a single command. Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin tried his best to woo the officers, one of the country's most conservative and well-organized forces. He committed himself in strong terms to try to prevent the military's breakup and promised to improve officers' housing.
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