Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsArmen Guzelimian
IN THE NEWS

Armen Guzelimian

ENTERTAINMENT
May 22, 1990 | DONNA PERLMUTTER
If Mehli Mehta had ended the 25th anniversary season of his American Youth Symphony on less than an invigorating, powerful and heartfelt note, he would have surprised a few of the faithful. Predictably, the 81-year-old conductor didn't do either Sunday at Royce Hall, UCLA. Nor was that likely with a program of 20th-Century Soviets--big-boned music of Prokofiev, Khachaturian and Shostakovich, the kind this orchestra trainer regularly gives his young charges with great success.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
November 21, 1990 | HERBERT GLASS
The program Monday night by the Los Angeles Philharmonic Chamber Society at Gindi Auditorium wasn't quite the festival of esoterica originally intended. Due to the indisposition of guest violinist Miriam Fried, the centerpiece of the evening--Kodaly's Duo for violin and cello--was replaced by Brahms' familiar E-minor Sonata for cello and piano. The sonata was given the advantage of vigor and forthrightness, where star teams tend to linger over the Brahmsian languor.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 22, 1986 | ALBERT GOLDBERG
According to the publicity, the goal of the newly formed Los Angeles Orchestral Ensemble is no less than "a fusion of the arts"--maybe a kind of midtown Los Angeles Gesamtkunstwerk. But nothing that pretentious occurred in the small recital hall of the Wilshire Ebell Club on Sunday afternoon. The ensemble was small, the audience was small, the music played was small. Nevertheless, the event was pleasant, and in a modest way interesting.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 20, 1986 | JOHN VOLAND
The Los Angeles Vocal Arts Ensemble proved to its near peril that a little kitsch can go an awful long way in traditional recitals, such as the one it gave Saturday at Ambassador Auditorium. Now, there's nothing wrong with a little reaching across the footlights with a sparkle of personality. But when that creeps into one's artistry--and makes of that artistry a populist compromise--then there's trouble.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 25, 2007 | Richard S. Ginell, Special to the Times
A new piano trio has come onto the scene, one that definitely has an identity of its own. Named after the 10th century Armenian mystic poet St. Gregory of Nareg, Trio Nareg aims to mix Armenian repertoire with European classics, not unlike the Dilijan Chamber Music Concert Series downtown. Appropriately, the trio made its debut Wednesday night in Burbank's Western Diocese of the Armenian Church of North America -- another distinctly different locale for the Da Camera Society of Mount St.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 9, 1998 | TIMOTHY MANGAN
Haydn is the composer of surprise. The father of the string quartet, a founder of the symphony, he is often thought of as the man who made the rules of the classical style. Actually, he lived to break them. This year's Haydnfest, presented Sunday at the Orange County Performing Arts Center by the Angeles String Quartet and pianist Armen Guzelimian, showed the composer for what he was, a sophisticated wit and intellect who made music by toying with listeners' expectations.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 22, 1990 | SUSAN BLISS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Impishness pervaded the ensemble formed by pianist Armen Guzelimian and the Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra Winds on Tuesday, and the fun was infectious.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 25, 1989 | SUSAN BLISS
A prospective chamber music series at Founders Hall in the Orange County Performing Arts Center was given its first test on Sunday afternoon by a quartet including violinist Mitchell Newman, violist Ralph Fielding, cellist Barry Gold--all members of the Los Angeles Philharmonic--and pianist Armen Guzelimian. Billed by Center officials as "Sundays at Four," it is, so far, only Sunday at Four. No other programs have yet been announced.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 10, 1992 | JOHN HENKEN
On paper the program for the Da Vinci String Quartet and friends looked fascinating enough. But perhaps most startling in the event, Tuesday at the Performing Arts Building of Pierce College, was the night-and-day aspect of its presentation. Dawn came after intermission with Chausson's rarely encountered "Chanson perpetuelle," a hothouse account of an abandoned woman's ardent embrace of Death.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|