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NEWS
October 11, 1989 | From Associated Press
Leaders of a political movement in the southern republic of Azerbaijan suspended on Tuesday a rail strike that choked off supplies of fuel, food and housing supplies to neighboring Armenia, a member said. "We decided in a directive to open the railroad to Armenia as of 2200 (10 p.m.)," said Ingilap Aslanov, a member of the grass-roots People's Front, in a telephone interview from the Azerbaijani capital, Baku. He said the strike was suspended until Oct.
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NEWS
October 15, 1991 | JONATHAN PETERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The railroad station where trains used to whistle by with food and other precious cargo is ghostly quiet. Somewhere over the brown hills of Azerbaijan, which rise just beyond this grape-growing village, thousands of Armenia-bound rail cars have screeched to an unscheduled halt. In its moment of national liberation, land-locked Armenia must scramble just to survive. "When they close down the railroads, Armenia gets nothing," said Babken Araktyan, the deputy chairman of Armenia's Parliament.
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NEWS
January 20, 1990 | ESTHER SCHRADER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It was cold, and Ria Minassian was serving a cold supper to her family, trying to preserve gas for the stove. Outside in the street, which is usually crowded with traffic, there were few cars. Motorists were preserving their fuel, too. "The situation is so difficult," Minassian said to a visitor. "I am afraid that one of these days I won't find food for my family. But we have had so many bad things happen to us these last two years that our hearts are getting hard. We can't even cry."
NEWS
January 20, 1990 | ESTHER SCHRADER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It was cold, and Ria Minassian was serving a cold supper to her family, trying to preserve gas for the stove. Outside in the street, which is usually crowded with traffic, there were few cars. Motorists were preserving their fuel, too. "The situation is so difficult," Minassian said to a visitor. "I am afraid that one of these days I won't find food for my family. But we have had so many bad things happen to us these last two years that our hearts are getting hard. We can't even cry."
NEWS
October 15, 1991 | JONATHAN PETERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The railroad station where trains used to whistle by with food and other precious cargo is ghostly quiet. Somewhere over the brown hills of Azerbaijan, which rise just beyond this grape-growing village, thousands of Armenia-bound rail cars have screeched to an unscheduled halt. In its moment of national liberation, land-locked Armenia must scramble just to survive. "When they close down the railroads, Armenia gets nothing," said Babken Araktyan, the deputy chairman of Armenia's Parliament.
BUSINESS
July 23, 2007 | Marc Lifsher, Times Staff Writer
In the summer of 2003, budget-cutting California lawmakers closed state trade promotion offices in London, Hong Kong, Mexico City and other world business centers, a dozen in all. But they voted to keep one open -- in Yerevan. That's in Armenia. Responding to an enthusiastic pitch from California's large and influential Armenian American community, the Legislature passed a law creating the California-Armenia Trade Office.
NEWS
October 11, 1989 | From Associated Press
Leaders of a political movement in the southern republic of Azerbaijan suspended on Tuesday a rail strike that choked off supplies of fuel, food and housing supplies to neighboring Armenia, a member said. "We decided in a directive to open the railroad to Armenia as of 2200 (10 p.m.)," said Ingilap Aslanov, a member of the grass-roots People's Front, in a telephone interview from the Azerbaijani capital, Baku. He said the strike was suspended until Oct.
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