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Armenian Americans Southern California

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 11, 1999 | KARIMA A. HAYNES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's a memory she says only death will erase. Siranosh Papazian Tanossian was born almost 100 years ago in the village of Izmit in northern Turkey. But today, the North Hills resident recounts with surprising detail so many memories, some happy, some of horror, from her days in the seafaring community. As a child, Tanossian attended kindergarten in the morning, played in her father's fabric shop after school and spent summer vacations in Istanbul.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 11, 1999 | KARIMA A. HAYNES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's a memory she says only death will erase. Siranosh Papazian Tanossian was born almost 100 years ago in the village of Izmit in northern Turkey. But today, the North Hills resident recounts with surprising detail so many memories, some happy, some of horror, from her days in the seafaring community. As a child, Tanossian attended kindergarten in the morning, played in her father's fabric shop after school and spent summer vacations in Istanbul.
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BUSINESS
February 4, 1992 | MICHAEL PARRISH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Yet another Southern Californian has been recruited by the Republic of Armenia as the young country labors to develop a free-market economy. Sebouh (Steve) Tashjian, 56, manager of cost engineering for Southern California Edison Co., will become Armenia's first minister of energy and fuels Feb. 9. And he unabashedly hopes to build business between his ethnic and adopted homes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 13, 2007 | Molly Hennessy-Fiske, Times Staff Writer
Hrant Zeitountzian, 97, of Pasadena still remembers being forced from his village into Syria by Turkish soldiers in 1915. He was 6 years old. His father, a mule driver, had already been taken from the family farm by Turkish soldiers. As Zeitountzian marched to Syria, he watched his brother and sister, both toddlers, fall ill and die, bodies in the mud, two of an estimated 1.5 million who would die during the relocations.
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