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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 19, 1986
I welcome your brief editorial attempting to clarify your previous ill-conceived editorial (April 30), "Anguish and Policy." Though you still err in the statement "Armenians call this genocide," implying only Armenians do so--and ignoring the pertinent facts of U.S. policy, which Rep. Tony Coelho (D-Merced) put forth in his letter (May 8)--you did hit upon the pivotal problem here: "To deny a cry for recognition . . . is to embitter the agony of its memory." Thank you. KINORA T. NERCESSIAN Westminster
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 2014 | By Los Angeles Times staff
Thousands are expected to commemorate the 99th anniversary of the Armenian genocide on Thursday, with several high-profile events scheduled across Southern California. The observances come just days after Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan  offered condolences to Armenian descendants of the massacre - an atrocity that Turkey still refuses to describe as a genocide. Roughly 1.5 million Armenians were killed starting in 1915 amid the chaotic collapse of the Ottoman Empire.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 23, 2013 | By Britanny Levine
To understand why Zaven Khanjian wants the Armenian community in Syria - a dwindling population caught in the crossfire of civil war - to endure, you have to go back nearly a century. Long before in-fighting began more than two years ago, Armenians settled in Syria after being driven out of Turkey during the genocide of 1915. Destitute and sick, the Christians were welcomed by the mostly Arabic Syrians and flourished, especially in Aleppo, a city close to the Turkish border and hard hit by war between rebel forces and the sitting government.
WORLD
April 23, 2014 | By Carol J. Williams
Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan offered condolences to Armenian descendants of massacre victims in a message ahead of the 99th anniversary of the atrocity that Turkey still refuses to describe as a genocide. The statement issued in seven languages and published widely in Turkish media laments the "shared pain" inflicted on those of all religions and ethnicities whose forebears were killed during the expulsions and brutalities that occurred as the Ottoman Empire collapsed during World War I. “The 24th of April carries a particular significance for our Armenian citizens and for all Armenians around the world, and provides a valuable opportunity to share opinions freely on a historical matter,” the statement said of the start of the years-long atrocity.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 2013 | By Alene Tchekmedyian
Hundreds of Armenians chanted outside the Turkish Consulate in Los Angeles on Wednesday to commemorate the massacre of about 1.5 million of their ancestors 98 years ago  - a genocide that has yet to be officially recognized by the U.S. Chanting “We will fight, we will fight, until the end!” in Armenian, the large crowd decried decades of denial by modern-day Turkey that a genocide occurred during the time of the Ottoman Empire. Among them was Glendale resident Armen Aroutiounian, 19, who called it  “pathetic”  that the United States and Turkish governments refuse to recognize the genocide.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 26, 2013 | By Nicole Charky
Local Armenian leaders on Tuesday used an appearance by President Obama at the DreamWorks Animation studio to request that the White House allow a Smithsonian display of a rug handmade by refugee orphans of the mass genocide about a century ago. It took about 10 months for Armenian genocide survivors living at an American-sponsored orphanage to weave and knot the 12-foot-by-18-foot rug, which was scheduled to be displayed at the Smithsonian Castle...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 4, 2014 | By Brittany Levine
The Armenian community in Glendale is reacting with anger to the takeover by rebels of the Syrian town of Kasab near the Turkish border that is home to about 2,500 Armenian Christians. Many Armenians consider the region to be historically part of their homeland. The Syrian rebel forces who overran the town came in through the Turkish border in March, prompting inhabitants to flee the violence. The takeover also was a painful reminder of the Armenian genocide, demonstrators said in Glendale, which is preparing to commemorate the 99th anniversary of the genocide later this month.
MAGAZINE
June 7, 1992
Whether the Armenians' deaths were brought on by war or genocide will be debated for decades to come. It's time that Armenians living here bury the hatchet on the Turkish issue or return to now-independent Armenia, where their shouts of hatred might fall on more sympathetic ears. PHILLIP A. PILGRAM Glendale
FOOD
March 12, 1997
The real "hidden chefs of Turkey" are the Armenians! Nine other ethnic groups were listed as contributors to the flavors of Gaziantep ("The Hidden Chefs of Turkey," Feb. 12). At the turn of the century, Armenians made up almost 50% of the population of Aintab (as Gaziantep was then known). I am certain they also made a contribution. The Turks refuse to acknowledge that Armenians were their predecessors in Asia Minor. The Times must not help perpetuate this myth. AURORA LEHMANN CHATSWORTH
NEWS
May 31, 1988
A Moscow dissident said that hundreds of thousands of Armenians rallied again in Yerevan, the capital of their Soviet republic, to renew territorial demands that form the core of an ethnic dispute. Journalist Sergei Grigoryants said that a protest by about 300,000 people occurred on a square in Yerevan where huge demonstrations were held in February. Grigoryants is half Russian and half Armenian. No independent confirmation was available.
WORLD
April 9, 2014 | By Patrick J. McDonnell
BEIRUT - They fled Kasab at daybreak, amid the clamor of artillery and word that Islamist rebels were advancing toward them from Turkey. About 2,500 residents, most of them ethnic Armenians, gathered documents and what few possessions they could carry. They piled into cars and minibuses that carried them 40 miles down mountain roads to the government-held city of Latakia. Only some elderly remained behind, residents said. "We escaped with the clothes on our back," said one of those who eventually made it to Lebanon.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 4, 2014 | By Brittany Levine
The Armenian community in Glendale is reacting with anger to the takeover by rebels of the Syrian town of Kasab near the Turkish border that is home to about 2,500 Armenian Christians. Many Armenians consider the region to be historically part of their homeland. The Syrian rebel forces who overran the town came in through the Turkish border in March, prompting inhabitants to flee the violence. The takeover also was a painful reminder of the Armenian genocide, demonstrators said in Glendale, which is preparing to commemorate the 99th anniversary of the genocide later this month.
SPORTS
December 23, 2013 | By Jim Peltz
The Galaxy said Monday it plans to play FC Shirak, the reigning champion in the Armenian Premier League, in a preseason game at StubHub Center on Feb. 8. This would be the first meeting between the two clubs and the first time that the Galaxy has hosted a team from the Armenian Premier League, the Galaxy said. FC Shirak is based in Gyumri, in northwest Armenia, and the club is in second place through the first half of the 2013-14 Premier League season there.  The Armenian club is led by Ivorian midfielder Serge Deble, who is tied for the league lead in goals with nine, the Galaxy said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 11, 2013 | George Skelton, Capitol Journal
Nelson Mandela and George Deukmejian never met. They never even communicated. But Mandela's freedom and the demise of South African apartheid resulted in no small part because of California's governor. Many in the United States and worldwide had a hand in pressuring South Africa into releasing Mandela after holding him as a political prisoner for 27 years and ending the nation's oft-violent racial segregation. But California's action in divesting itself of the bigoted regime greatly increased American pressure and wouldn't have happened without Deukmejian.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 26, 2013 | By Nicole Charky
Local Armenian leaders on Tuesday used an appearance by President Obama at the DreamWorks Animation studio to request that the White House allow a Smithsonian display of a rug handmade by refugee orphans of the mass genocide about a century ago. It took about 10 months for Armenian genocide survivors living at an American-sponsored orphanage to weave and knot the 12-foot-by-18-foot rug, which was scheduled to be displayed at the Smithsonian Castle...
OPINION
November 15, 2013
Re "Open feud over hidden rug," Nov. 13 The old saying about "sweeping things under the rug" gets fresh meaning in this latest Washington nonsense, in which the Obama administration is refusing the Smithsonian the right to display a stunning carpet hand woven by orphans of the Armenian genocide and presented to President Calvin Coolidge in 1925. The rug is exquisite, and it is in storage. Isn't this carpet worthy to be seen, and isn't this story worthy to be heard? Don't Americans have the right to see the result of one of their numerous humanitarian efforts?
REAL ESTATE
March 4, 2007
I found "A Heritage in Common," Feb. 11, on local Armenians in Glendale, very interesting and will pass it on to a friend who is Russian Armenian. It mentioned social services that are available to immigrants. Would you please give me more information? FRANCES VELLA Los Angeles Editor's note: The Armenian Relief Society in Glendale offers family counseling, employment referrals and immigration and social services. For information, call (818) 241-7533, go to www.arswestusa.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 11, 2013 | By Joe Piasecki
A proposal to memorialize victims of the Armenian genocide with a monument in Pasadena received unanimous approval from Pasadena City Council members Monday, a decision cheered by Armenian American leaders in Glendale who have joined the effort to see it built. Organizers of the nonprofit Pasadena Armenian Genocide Memorial Committee are raising funds to erect the monument at Memorial Park in central Pasadena before the centennial observance of the genocide on April 24, 2015.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 11, 2013 | By Jill Cowan
Eight of 70 defendants charged in a wide-reaching investigation that targeted the small but ruthless Armenian Power gang pleaded guilty this week in federal court, authorities said Wednesday. Four of the eight were allegedly "members or associates" of the organized crime syndicate, which investigators say took root in east Hollywood in the 1980s. The other four took part in Armenian Power-driven crimes, but were not actual gang members, according to a U.S. attorney's office news release.
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