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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 19, 2009 | By Jack Leonard
A former security guard accused of fatally shooting an 18-year-old college student in a Palmdale parking lot nearly a decade ago was convicted of murder Friday, authorities said. The verdict caps a lengthy legal saga that began when Raymond Lee Jennings first reported finding Michelle O'Keefe's body during a routine patrol of the park-and-ride lot. Investigators found the victim, a student at Antelope Valley College, slumped in the front seat of her Ford Mustang. She had been shot four times in the chest and face.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 11, 2014 | By Catherine Saillant and Louis Sahagun
Faced with losing an ambitious $1-billion plan to revamp the Los Angeles River, Mayor Eric Garcetti on Friday raised the stakes by offering to split the cost with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. The corps, which manages the river as a flood control channel, last year recommended a $453-million package of parks, bike paths and other enhancements to make the river more inviting to Angelenos. It recently informed the mayor's office that it was sticking with that plan rather than pursuing the $1-billion version, known as Alternative 20, that Garcetti backs.
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WORLD
August 7, 2013 | By Mark Magnier
NEW DELHI - The Myanmar army released 62 child soldiers Wednesday in its latest bid to meet international human rights standards, although critics said more children still remain in uniform. Since the army agreed to end the practice in June 2012, about 170 children and young adults have been let out of the army. No exact figures are available on the total number of child soldiers in Myanmar, although human rights group Burma Campaign UK has estimated there are 5,000. Analysts say Myanmar, also known as Burma, stepped up child recruitment a quarter-century ago as a way to meet its manpower quotas.
NATIONAL
April 6, 2014 | Alan Zarembo
In a windowless cinder-block room at Ft. Hood on Wednesday morning, 11 soldiers closed their eyes and practiced taking deep, slow breaths. The technique is useful for gaining self-control in stressful situations, explained their instructor. In the course of the day, the students would practice escaping a wrestling hold while being taunted by fellow soldiers. They would balance a dime on the end of an M16 rifle. They would watch a clip from the movie "Talladega Nights" in which Will Ferrell tries to get into a car with a cougar in the front seat.
OPINION
March 22, 2014
Re "Sinclair tearfully pleads for a lenient sentence," March 20 Brig. Gen. Jeffrey A. Sinclair will get what he pleaded for: generous military benefits for his family as a result of not being dismissed from the Army. But did he think of them when he made such dishonorable decisions? Sinclair should have been dismissed and forced to get a job to support his family. He should have thought about his pension and his family before he exploited women. Leslie Neff Hermosa Beach ALSO: Letters: A different kind of Cold War Letters: Odds are it's the media's fault Letters: How to pay for fixing the streets
SPORTS
October 24, 2009 | Associated Press
Joe Martinek had 139 yards rushing and scored twice on short runs, linebacker Steve Beauharnais scored off his blocked punt and Rutgers beat Army, 27-10, on Friday night at West Point, N.Y. It was the sixth straight victory for Rutgers (5-2) over Army (3-5) and evened the series at 18-18. The Black Knights have lost 12 straight games against Big East Conference teams since beating Rutgers, 37-35, in 1997. Tom Savage completed 10 of 20 passes for 164 yards to become only the second freshman quarterback in Rutgers history to win a road game.
NATIONAL
February 21, 2012 | By Kim Murphy
The head of the Army 's Madigan Healthcare System, one of the largest military hospitals on the West Coast, has been temporarily relieved of command amid an investigation over whether the Army has avoided diagnosing returning combat soldiers with post-traumatic stress disorder to save money. Col. Dallas Homas, a West Point graduate has been administratively removed from his position near Joint Base Lewis-McChord in Washington state, Army officials announced Monday. Homas had headed the busy medical center since March 2011.  Meanwhile, 14 soldiers who complained about their initial PTSD reviews were scheduled Tuesday to begin receiving the results of a new round of medical evaluations.
OPINION
November 30, 2011 | By David B. Grusky
When President Obama announced that 40,000 troops now in Iraq would come home by the end of the year, the initial excitement quickly turned to concern that our already struggling economy couldn't easily handle the shock of an additional 40,000 job seekers. Although we should, of course, care deeply about returning Iraq war veterans, we ought not to think for a moment that adding 40,000 workers to the job-seeking pool will break the back of the economy. It's already broken. The nation is laboring under the weight of a reserve army of nearly 27 million women and men who don't have a full-time job, but most surely want one. The term "reserve army of labor" is vintage Karl Marx.
OPINION
April 26, 2007
Re "Tillman's brother lashes out," April 25 If the Army can present a bald-faced lie to the family of one of its own, to the point of ordering witnesses to keep silent about the truth, what bigger lies could the Army be babbling at the rest of us? I can guess at some: That conditions in Iraq are getting better. That the insurgencies in Iraq and Afghanistan are beatable. That the surge is something other than a further tragic waste of American lives. That our prisoners and "detainees" are being treated humanely and fairly.
OPINION
February 20, 2006
The Army made up for recruiting shortfalls by welcoming 630 recruits last year with histories of what the Army termed "serious criminal misconduct" -- including manslaughter and making terrorist threats (Feb. 14). Meanwhile, more than 10,000 personnel have been discharged since 1994 under the military's "Don't Ask, Don't Tell" policy barring openly gay and lesbian service members. Interestingly, a University of California commission's report on the same day as your article estimates that the Pentagon policy of booting sexual minorities has cost taxpayers $363.
NATIONAL
April 4, 2014 | Molly Hennessy-Fiske and Alan Zarembo and Adolfo Flores
After the sudden death of his mother in November, Army Spc. Ivan Lopez was upset that officials at Ft. Hood granted him less than two days to go home to Puerto Rico for her funeral. Carmen Lopez's death from a heart attack came just a month after that of his grandfather. Months later, the 34-year-old musician, father and decorated soldier posted a chilling message on his Facebook page about a robbery at his home, saying the devil had taken him and he was "full of hatred. " Lopez opened fire with a semiautomatic handgun, killing three fellow service members and wounding 16 others before turning the weapon on himself at Ft. Hood on Wednesday.
NATIONAL
April 4, 2014 | By Richard A. Serrano, Molly Hennessy-Fiske and Joe Mozingo
When Army Spc. Ivan Lopez went on the shooting rampage Wednesday at Ft. Hood, Texas, killing three soldiers and injuring 16 others, he had just learned that superiors in Washington had rejected his request to take a temporary leave to deal with family matters related to his mother's death, a federal law enforcement official said. The incident marked the second time Lopez had clashed with military supervisors over the issue of leave - he had been granted less than two days when his mother died in November - and the latest such denial left him furious, the official said.
NATIONAL
April 2, 2014 | By Alan Zarembo, Molly Hennessy-Fiske and John M. Glionna
KILLEEN, Texas - Four people were killed, including the gunman, and 16 others were hurt Wednesday in a shooting rampage at Ft. Hood, which in 2009 was the scene of the deadliest mass shooting on a military base in U.S. history. The gunman was a soldier, an Iraq war veteran who was being evaluated for post-traumatic stress disorder, the military said at an evening news conference. Army Lt. Gen. Mark Milley, the base commander, refused to identify the gunman but said he had killed himself when confronted by a military policewoman.
OPINION
April 1, 2014 | By David Schenker
Three years into the Syrian civil war, neighboring Lebanon is fraying at the seams. Over the last year, as Lebanese Sunni Muslim jihadis and their counterparts in the Shiite militia Hezbollah fought each other in Syria, at least 16 car bombs detonated in Lebanon, in both Shiite and Sunni neighborhoods. In December, a leading Sunni politician was assassinated. Meanwhile, more than 1 million mostly Sunni refugees have streamed in from Syria, increasing Lebanon's population by more than 20% and skewing its delicate sectarian balance.
BUSINESS
March 23, 2014 | By Roger Vincent
The gig: Ray Adamyk, 52, is president of Spectra Co., a Pomona firm that has played a major role in restoring such prominent historic buildings as the El Capitan Theatre in Hollywood, the Catalina Casino in Avalon and the Biltmore Hotel in downtown Los Angeles. In his view, preservation and environmentalism are two sides of the same coin. "The greenest building is one that already exists," he said. "I think people want to see old buildings restored. " Early days: Adamyk was born in England and reared in Canada, where he enjoyed physically demanding sports in his school days.
OPINION
March 23, 2014
Re "Army general gets no jail in sex case," March 21 Army Brig. Gen. Jeffrey A. Sinclair is a sexual predator who has been afforded access and cover by the authority of his position and rank within the military. The slap on the wrist he received sends a powerful message throughout the military that the good-old boys' club is alive and well. Sinclair's lenient punishment is an outrage that we can't afford to tolerate and a clear indication that justice can't be served within the military when it comes to sexual predation.
WORLD
February 5, 2011 | By Timothy M. Phelps and Ned Parker, Los Angeles Times Staff Writers
The Egyptian army began Saturday to reassert control around Tahrir Square, while government officials attempted to negotiate an end to the crisis with opposition leaders. Hundreds of soldiers moved into a small side street leading to the square past the Egyptian Museum where the most intense fighting between pro- and anti-government forces has taken place. Angry protesters confronted the soldiers at both ends of the street, but for the first time the army appeared to have sufficient numbers to maintain control.
NATIONAL
October 30, 2009 | Ralph Vartabedian
Under a federal program to transform government facilities into models of energy efficiency, Honeywell International Inc. came calling on Army commanders here with a deal to replace the base's decades-old steam power plant. The company proposed installing millions of dollars in new heating equipment and hooking the base to the local power grid -- all free in exchange for the company getting the bulk of future energy savings. It was precisely the kind of deal that politicians and bureaucrats in Washington were pushing at facilities across the country -- modernizing aging machinery without the government spending any money of its own. But today, the Ft. Richardson deal, one of the largest among hundreds of similar contracts, has sunk into a morass of accounting disputes and allegations of misconduct.
OPINION
March 22, 2014
Re "Sinclair tearfully pleads for a lenient sentence," March 20 Brig. Gen. Jeffrey A. Sinclair will get what he pleaded for: generous military benefits for his family as a result of not being dismissed from the Army. But did he think of them when he made such dishonorable decisions? Sinclair should have been dismissed and forced to get a job to support his family. He should have thought about his pension and his family before he exploited women. Leslie Neff Hermosa Beach ALSO: Letters: A different kind of Cold War Letters: Odds are it's the media's fault Letters: How to pay for fixing the streets
NATIONAL
March 20, 2014 | By David Zucchino, This post has been updated. See the note below for details.
FT. BRAGG, N.C. - Brig. Gen. Jeffrey A. Sinclair was sentenced Thursday, receiving a reprimand and no jail time for mistreating a subordinate with whom he had a three-year adulterous affair, to end a tumultuous court-martial that focused national attention on the military's uneven response to sexual misconduct in the ranks. The military judge hearing the case, Col. James L. Pohl, also ordered Sinclair, 51, to forfeit $5,000 of pay per month for four months and pay restitution of around $4,100 for misusing his government charge card.
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