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Army Corps Of Engineers U S

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 14, 1998 | DAVID ROSENZWEIG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal judge left intact Monday his recent order halting work on 16.1 acres of wetlands on the sprawling Playa Vista project until the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers conducts a thorough review of environmental hazards. Judge Ronald S.W. Lew rebuffed bids by both sides in the long-running legal dispute over development of the 1,087-acre site near Marina del Rey.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 10, 1998
Environmentalists opposed to the residential and commercial Playa Vista project accused the developers of defying a court order by resuming grading at the site this week and vowed to return to court. Marcia Hanscom of the Wetlands Action Network said her organization and two others plan to ask a federal judge today for a court order to halt bulldozing at the 1,087-acre site south of Marina del Rey.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 27, 1998 | DAVID ROSENZWEIG and ABIGAIL GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A federal judge Friday ordered a halt to the filling of wetlands at the Playa Vista project until the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers conducts a more thorough review of environmental hazards there. U.S. District Judge Ronald S.W. Lew said the corps was wrong to grant a permit to the developers based on piecemeal environmental studies at the 1,087-acre site adjoining Marina del Rey.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 26, 1998
The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers has determined that plans for the giant Playa Vista development do not violate the Endangered Species Act. In January, several environmental groups sued the corps, charging that the developer's plans to build a 1,000-acre residential and commercial complex in the Ballona Wetlands area would harm 19 species of birds and animals.
NEWS
June 21, 1998 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The river workhorse begins here in the northern Idaho farm belt, slicing a canyon through the rolling grasslands of the most productive wheat fields in the nation. Here, the Snake River takes 722,000 tons a year of wheat and barley on its back and carries it down through the confluence with the Columbia River and on to the sea--465 miles of what was once the wildest river system in the West.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 1, 1997 | SHARON BERNSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The cranes and chain saws have removed the last shreds of vegetation from Medea Creek in Agoura Hills, and just a few water birds swim in the unshaded water. Now, officials say, this creek and nearly 100 channels like it in Los Angeles County will flow as originally intended, guiding rainwater to the sea and away from the flood plains where homes are located.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 1, 1997 | SHARON BERNSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The cranes and chain saws have removed the last shreds of vegetation from Medea Creek in Agoura Hills, and just a few water birds swim in the unshaded water. Now, officials say, this creek and nearly 100 channels like it in Los Angeles County will flow as originally intended, guiding rainwater to the sea and away from the flood plains where homes are located.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 23, 1997 | KARIMA A. HAYNES
The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers has determined that construction of a new California Army National Guard armory at Sepulveda Basin will not adversely affect the environment. The corps released the findings in its final environmental assessment report, Herb Nesmith, a corps public affairs officer, said Wednesday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 22, 1997 | SHARON BERNSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
By Friday, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers should grant permission to clear Los Angeles County's clogged flood control channels, the agency's top regional official told the Board of Supervisors on Tuesday. But in a bizarre twist that played itself out in a nearly two-hour debate moments later, political differences among the supervisors may prevent the work from starting immediately, increasing the possibility that El Nino-triggered winter storms could cause the channels to overflow.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 12, 1997 | SHARON BERNSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Thirty feet below a smelly, trash-strewn path between a shopping center and a condominium complex, a wild forest of reeds and brush bursts forth from a barely moving stretch of Medea Creek in Agoura Hills. Defiantly green against the surrounding concrete, these cattails, arundo and willows provide an odd and incongruous patch of beauty behind a locked and rusting chain-link fence.
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