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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 29, 1988 | JIM CARLTON, Times Staff Writer
On May 30, 1944--in the midst of World War II--U.S. Army Pvt. Alex F. Miranda stood before an American firing squad in England and spoke his last words. "Pray for me," the 20-year-old soldier from Santa Ana beseeched a chaplain. "And may God have a place for you in heaven." Then Pvt. Miranda, who had fatally shot his sleeping sergeant almost three months earlier, was felled by a volley from 10 rifle-bearing soldiers.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 2011 | By Ching-Ching Ni, Los Angeles Times
You cannot buy your way into the U.S. military, Army officials reminded the public Monday, trying to clear up confusion in the Chinese American community after an El Monte man was arrested last week in connection with charging immigrants to join what authorities said was a phony military force. "No legitimate U.S. Army recruiter will ever ask an applicant for money in order to serve in the military," said Capt. Patrick Caukin, commander of a U.S. Army recruiting office based in West Covina.
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NATIONAL
August 20, 2006 | Deborah Nelson and Nick Turse, Special to The Times
In early 1973, Army Chief of Staff Gen. Creighton Abrams received some bad news from the service's chief of criminal investigations. An internal inquiry had confirmed an officer's widely publicized charge that members of the 173rd Airborne Brigade had tortured detainees in Vietnam. But there was a silver lining: Investigators had also compiled a 53-page catalog of alleged discrepancies in retired Lt. Col. Anthony B. Herbert's public accounts of his war experiences. "This package ...
NATIONAL
November 12, 2009 | Tom Hamburger
Doctors supervising Maj. Nidal Malik Hasan's medical training at Walter Reed Army Medical Center frequently discussed concerns about the Muslim psychiatrist's behavior, including his aggressive proselytizing of patients, a Defense Department official said Wednesday. The problems led the doctors to question Hasan's fitness for military service, but no action was taken in the months before he was transferred from Washington to Ft. Hood, Texas, where he is suspected of opening fire last week on military and civilian personnel, killing 13 and wounding dozens.
NEWS
April 2, 1994 | From Reuters
A U.S. Army sergeant who decapitated his wife's lover and brought the head to her hospital bedside was found guilty of premeditated murder by a military court Friday. A jury of four officers and three non-commissioned officers deliberated less than two hours before reaching the guilty verdict on Sgt. Stephen Schap, 26, of Baltimore. Schap, who faces a mandatory life sentence under U.S. military justice, sat ramrod straight and showed little emotion as the court martial's verdict was read.
SCIENCE
August 18, 2007 | Karen Kaplan, Times Staff Writer
Eric Miller's career as an Army Ranger wasn't ended by a battlefield wound, but his DNA. Lurking in his genes was a mutation that made him vulnerable to uncontrolled tumor growth. After suffering back pain during a tour in Afghanistan, he underwent three surgeries to remove tumors from his brain and spine that left him with numbness throughout the left side of his body. So began his journey into a dreaded scenario of the genetic age.
NATIONAL
October 2, 2009 | David Zucchino
Before soldiers leave on missions in Iraq or Afghanistan, they often are ordered to do everything in their power to bring their buddies back. "Leave no man behind" is the motto. But does that military ethos apply to soldiers heading out for a rowdy weekend in the United States? That question is being raised at an unusual court-martial on this massive Army base, where a young paratrooper who struggled to bring a combative, drunk soldier back to the barracks has been accused of causing his death.
NATIONAL
October 30, 2005 | John Bull, Newport News Daily Press
A clam-dredging operation off the coast of New Jersey last summer pulled up an old artillery shell. The long-submerged World War I-era explosive was filled with a black, tar-like substance. Bomb-disposal technicians from Dover Air Force Base in Delaware were brought in to dismantle the shell, and they found it was filled with mustard gas in solid form. Three of the technicians were injured.
NATIONAL
February 25, 2006 | From Associated Press
The Army has charged seven paratroopers from the 82nd Airborne Division with engaging in sex acts in videos shown on a gay pornography website. Three of the soldiers face courts-martial on charges of sodomy, pandering and engaging in sex acts for money, according to a statement released by the military Friday. Four other soldiers received what the military called nonjudicial punishments. The Army has recommended that all the paratroopers involved be discharged.
BUSINESS
February 27, 1990 | JOHN MEDEARIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Most people thinking of stealth aircraft probably think about the B-2 Stealth bomber: invisible to radar, fast, sleek, with an estimated price tag of $500 million or more. Not Carter Ward. When his thoughts turn to stealth aircraft, Ward thinks about something stubby, with a top speed of 28 m.p.h. and costing only about $195,000. The stealth blimp.
NATIONAL
November 12, 2009 | Nicholas Riccardi
When an Army psychiatrist allegedly fired upon soldiers preparing to deploy to war, the highest victim toll was exacted from his peers in the counseling realm -- members of the Wisconsin-based 467th Medical Detachment. Three members of the 43-soldier unit were killed and several more injured before the suspected gunman, Maj. Nidal Malik Hasan, was brought down by two civilian police officers. A week later, the 467th embodies Ft Hood's struggle to return to normalcy. Its members are wrestling with the grief and trauma of the attack even as they prepare to leave for Afghanistan, where they will counsel soldiers struggling to deal with the stresses of the battlefield.
NATIONAL
November 12, 2009 | Cox Newspapers
For days, retired Army Col. John Galligan tracked each wrenching update about the shooting rampage at Ft. Hood, the place where he had spent the final months of a 30-year military career. As a former military lawyer, he ran through his mind the legal issues in a possible case against Maj. Nidal Malik Hasan, the man accused in the shootings, including whether Hasan could get a fair trial there. Then, the phone rang at his limestone office on this town's main street: Hasan's family wanted to hire him. Within 24 hours, Galligan was introducing himself to the soldier whose picture he had seen in newspapers and on national television.
NATIONAL
November 12, 2009 | Sebastian Rotella and Josh Meyer
The radical cleric contacted by accused Ft. Hood gunman Maj. Nidal Malik Hasan has such unmistakable connections to past terrorist plots that his e-mail exchanges with the American should have triggered an all-out investigation, a number of officials and experts now believe. Anwar al Awlaki is an extremist whose sermons have helped radicalize terrorists from Atlanta to New Jersey to London, including cases in which the U.S. military was targeted. A well-spoken Yemeni American, Awlaki has emerged as the leading ideologue for a homegrown generation of young militants who conspire over the Internet.
NATIONAL
November 8, 2009
The 13 killed CAPT. JOHN GAFFANEY 56, San Diego Gaffaney was a psychiatric nurse who worked for San Diego County for more than 20 years, and on the day before the shooting he had arrived at Ft. Hood to prepare for deployment to Iraq. Gaffaney, born in Williston, N.D., had served in the Navy and the California National Guard, his family said. After Sept. 11, he tried to sign up again for military service. Although the Army Reserves at first declined, he got the call about two years ago asking him to rejoin, said his co-worker Stephanie Powell: "He wanted to help the boys in Iraq and Afghanistan deal with the trauma of what they were seeing."
NATIONAL
November 7, 2009 | Duke Helfand and Richard Fausset
The news made Nihad Awad sick to his stomach. Like the rest of the nation, Awad, who heads the Council on American-Islamic Relations, learned this week that it allegedly was a Muslim who opened fire at a U.S. Army base in Texas, killing 13 people and injuring many more. According to witnesses, Army Maj. Nidal Malik Hasan issued the great, exalting cry of his faith before opening fire: " Allahu akbar !" God is great. Hearing the story, Awad too would invoke his maker -- but with a weary lament that is echoing coast to coast among American Muslims.
NATIONAL
October 30, 2009 | Ralph Vartabedian
Under a federal program to transform government facilities into models of energy efficiency, Honeywell International Inc. came calling on Army commanders here with a deal to replace the base's decades-old steam power plant. The company proposed installing millions of dollars in new heating equipment and hooking the base to the local power grid -- all free in exchange for the company getting the bulk of future energy savings. It was precisely the kind of deal that politicians and bureaucrats in Washington were pushing at facilities across the country -- modernizing aging machinery without the government spending any money of its own. But today, the Ft. Richardson deal, one of the largest among hundreds of similar contracts, has sunk into a morass of accounting disputes and allegations of misconduct.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 17, 2006 | Bob Sipchen, Times Staff Writer
SHORTLY after Jeffrey "Toz" Toczylowski's last mission in Iraq a year ago this month, friends received a message. "If you are getting this e-mail, it means that I have passed away," the missive said. "No, it's not a sick Toz joke, but a letter I wanted to write in case this happened." The Army Special Forces captain, 30, said he would like family and friends to attend his burial at Arlington National Cemetery, "but understand if you can't make it."
NEWS
December 30, 1995 | NORA ZAMICHOW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Brushing aside deteriorating weather conditions and flood waters nearing a 100-year high, U.S. Army engineers Friday ended days of frustration and began spanning the fast-moving Sava River with a temporary bridge. The span, more than three football fields in length, is expected to be completed today. If it is, the first U.S. Army truck and troop convoys will begin rolling over the river into Bosnia almost immediately.
NATIONAL
October 2, 2009 | David Zucchino
Before soldiers leave on missions in Iraq or Afghanistan, they often are ordered to do everything in their power to bring their buddies back. "Leave no man behind" is the motto. But does that military ethos apply to soldiers heading out for a rowdy weekend in the United States? That question is being raised at an unusual court-martial on this massive Army base, where a young paratrooper who struggled to bring a combative, drunk soldier back to the barracks has been accused of causing his death.
NATIONAL
May 27, 2009 | Associated Press
The Pentagon is prepared to leave fighting forces in Iraq for as long as a decade despite an agreement between the United States and Iraq that would bring all American troops home by 2012, the top U.S. Army officer said Tuesday. Gen. George W. Casey Jr., the Army chief of staff, said the world remains dangerous, and the Pentagon must plan for extended U.S. combat and stability operations in two wars. "Global trends are pushing in the wrong direction," Casey said.
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