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NEWS
August 25, 1990 | NANCY WRIDE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An Army Reserve water-transportation unit with about 100 members in Southern California, including Orange County, has been placed on alert status for a possible call to active duty, military officials announced in Los Alamitos on Friday. The unit placed on alert is the 316th Quartermaster Company, based at Miramar Naval Air Station in San Diego County. Officials said they could not immediately determine how many of the reservists in the unit are Orange County residents. Maj. Gen. Theodore W.
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NEWS
February 24, 1991 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Through the powerful night-vision gun sights, they looked like ghostly sheep flushed from a pen--Iraqi infantrymen bewildered and terrified, jarred from sleep and fleeing their bunkers under a hellish fire. One by one, they were cut down by attackers they could not see or understand. Some were blown to bits by bursts of 30-millimeter exploding cannon shells. One man dropped, writhed on the ground, then struggled to his feet; another burst of fire tore him apart.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 24, 1991 | HENRY CHU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The squad leader knelt in the bone-dry earth, his gaze roving slowly over the green-and-yellow painted faces before him. "Our mission," he said gravely as he jabbed a stick at a tiny toy truck in the sand, "is to destroy, and to get whatever information we can from this ambush." As he issued orders to his soldiers, a second squad was already elbowing its way through the crackling brush, preparing to respond to a deadly sniper attack. Another squad was combing a nearby hill on reconnaissance.
NEWS
September 5, 1987 | IMBERT MATTHEE and TED THACKREY JR., Times Staff Writers
A plague of fire continued its unchecked course through the brush and timberland of California on Friday, driving at least 15,000 people from their homes, blackening nearly 600 square miles of watershed and closing campgrounds to Labor Day vacationers. The largest fire, a 100,000-acre blaze threatening the Tuolumne City and Groveland communities, was still out of control and moving in the direction of Yosemite National Park, where a separate fire was already burning near Cherry Creek.
NEWS
December 3, 1990 | KENNETH REICH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Persian Gulf crisis has sharpened a dispute over the U.S. Army's desire to expand its main desert warfare training center at Ft. Irwin, a sprawling, 1,000-square-mile facility in an isolated area of San Bernardino County. The expansion plan, which would add almost 250,000 acres to the Army's land, has moved slowly because of local opposition.
NEWS
March 22, 1996 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Army announced plans Thursday to tighten its regulations for dealing with extremist activities in its ranks in order to make it easier for officers and sergeants to stop soldiers from wearing hate-group emblems and hanging Nazi flags in their barracks. The move, part of a package of new measures ordered by Secretary of the Army Togo West Jr., followed the recommendations of an emergency panel that studied the situation after two soldiers were charged in the murder of a black couple near Ft.
NEWS
September 22, 1997 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Alarmed by a boom in commercial spy satellites, the Army is poised to fire up a furnace in the New Mexico desert, collect the raging energy on mirrors and focus it into a laser beam aimed to cripple a satellite hundreds of miles up in space. Army scientists hope the million-watt laser, the nation's largest, could blind orbiting eyes that might reveal the position of U.S. and allied troops and weapons in times of war.
NEWS
April 20, 1991 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They are, in a world where misery keeps banging on the front gate with clenched brown fists, two U.S. Army medics armed with stethoscopes, antibiotics and the will to comfort a nation past solace. The clinic in Safwan consists of a few examining tables, tall stacks of medication boxes, buckets of water mixed with antiseptic--and, everywhere, the hot, dry wind of an uneasy early summer, pushing through shattered windowpanes and rustling the robes of the waiting patients.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 5, 1999 | GEORGE RAMOS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hoping to boost the recruitment of Latinos by the military, Secretary of the Army Louis Caldera on Friday came back to Los Angeles--home to the largest Spanish-surnamed population in the United States--to underscore his contention that Latinos are underrepresented in the Army. And he recruited two well-known Californians, Gov. Gray Davis and former Serb captive Andrew Ramirez, to help him in the effort.
NEWS
August 23, 1995 | From Associated Press
The Army has announced that it is overhauling its training regulations, six months after four Ranger trainees died from exposure they suffered in a chilly Florida swamp. The Army said it is dropping night water training and will provide trainees with more sleep and food before sending them into the swamps for up to two weeks. Also, instructors will have to wade through the areas themselves before sending in their students. "We haven't made it less tough. It is still a challenging course," Col.
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