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NEWS
September 22, 1997 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Alarmed by a boom in commercial spy satellites, the Army is poised to fire up a furnace in the New Mexico desert, collect the raging energy on mirrors and focus it into a laser beam aimed to cripple a satellite hundreds of miles up in space. Army scientists hope the million-watt laser, the nation's largest, could blind orbiting eyes that might reveal the position of U.S. and allied troops and weapons in times of war.
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NEWS
April 20, 1991 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They are, in a world where misery keeps banging on the front gate with clenched brown fists, two U.S. Army medics armed with stethoscopes, antibiotics and the will to comfort a nation past solace. The clinic in Safwan consists of a few examining tables, tall stacks of medication boxes, buckets of water mixed with antiseptic--and, everywhere, the hot, dry wind of an uneasy early summer, pushing through shattered windowpanes and rustling the robes of the waiting patients.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 5, 1999 | GEORGE RAMOS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hoping to boost the recruitment of Latinos by the military, Secretary of the Army Louis Caldera on Friday came back to Los Angeles--home to the largest Spanish-surnamed population in the United States--to underscore his contention that Latinos are underrepresented in the Army. And he recruited two well-known Californians, Gov. Gray Davis and former Serb captive Andrew Ramirez, to help him in the effort.
NEWS
August 23, 1995 | From Associated Press
The Army has announced that it is overhauling its training regulations, six months after four Ranger trainees died from exposure they suffered in a chilly Florida swamp. The Army said it is dropping night water training and will provide trainees with more sleep and food before sending them into the swamps for up to two weeks. Also, instructors will have to wade through the areas themselves before sending in their students. "We haven't made it less tough. It is still a challenging course," Col.
NEWS
January 9, 1990 | Associated Press
A contingent of about 700 82nd Airborne Division troops arrived home Monday to shouts of joy and hugs of relatives, but the bulk of paratroopers from Ft. Bragg remained in Panama. "There are hundreds of thousands of Panamanians that will be forever grateful to you for bringing them freedom--for the rest of their lives--for bringing them peace and bringing them prosperity," Gen. Edwin H. Burba Jr. of Command Forces in Atlanta told the soldiers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 16, 1996 | MIMI KO CRUZ, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The marching, flag-raising and single-file roll calls are the same as they were decades ago. But a rebirth of the Junior Reserve Officer Training Corps program has swollen the ranks with high school cadets on a decidedly nonmilitary mission. Over the last few years, Orange County's two JROTC programs have increased to 14 programs with 1,558 cadets, and the former bastion of adolescent males is now about one-third female--many of whom are taking command. "It's an explosion," said Col. James H.
NEWS
April 15, 1994 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two U.S. jet fighters mistakenly shot down a pair of U.S. Army helicopters over northern Iraq early Thursday morning, killing 15 Americans and 11 foreign officials in an episode that left U.S. military officers baffled as to how the tragedy could have occurred. U.S. officials said the helicopters, both Army UH-60 Blackhawks, were ferrying a team of foreign officers and Kurds on a routine visit to remote Kurdish villages. They said the pilots of the U.S.
NEWS
December 30, 1988 | ERIC MALNIC and AMY STEVENS, Times Staff Writers
Closure of six military installations in California--among them the Army's historic Presidio in San Francisco and three major Air Force bases--would cost the state more than 17,000 military and civilian jobs and hundreds of millions of dollars in wages, Department of Defense figures show. Just what would be done with most of the thousands of acres of property vacated by the military has not been worked out, but, in the case of the Presidio, all but 36.
NEWS
August 10, 1999 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Army announced in Washington, D.C., that it was temporarily grounding its entire fleet of CH-47 Chinook transport helicopters after a crack was found in a transmission gear in one being used by the United Kingdom's Royal Air Force. "The fleet is grounded. It's a precautionary measure," said an Army spokeswoman, Nancy Ray. She said 466 helicopters in the Army fleet were involved in the temporary grounding. "In an overhaul, the Royal Air Force discovered a cracked gear.
BUSINESS
December 31, 1999 | Karen Kaplan
Computer Sciences Corp. won a major information technology contract to modernize the U.S. Army's wholesale logistics business processes. As part of the 10-year, $680-million contract, the El Segundo firm agreed to offer employment to about 300 civilian Army employees, said company spokesman Frank Pollare. CSC's Federal Sector Defense Group in Falls Church, Va., will carry out the contract with a team of companies. CSC shares gained $2.
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