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WORLD
May 5, 2010 | By Tracy Wilkinson, Los Angeles Times
The Almanzas slowed down as they drove their black pickup past what they believed to be an army checkpoint in violent northeastern Mexico. They rolled down their windows, they say, so the soldiers could see they were a family. But the masked men in uniform instead opened fire, and two Almanza children, aged 9 and 5, were killed. Fifteen days earlier and just 100 miles away, two promising university students were killed at the gates of their school during an army battle with drug traffickers.
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NATIONAL
April 13, 2014 | By Lalita Clozel
WASHINGTON - Raised on his father's and grandfather's tales of military service in India, Amitoj Chhabra wanted nothing more than to follow in their footsteps and join the U.S. Air Force. "I dreamt it. I slept it. It was all I ever thought about 24/7," Chhabra recalled. But the dream died before he even reached boot camp. When he tried to enlist, Chhabra, a Sikh from Reno, was told that his long hair and beard, which Sikhs are religiously mandated to keep unshorn, collided with Air Force grooming requirements.
WORLD
January 30, 2011 | By Edmund Sanders, Los Angeles Times
As Yousef Ahmed, a 25-year-old protester, marched along a riverfront boulevard Saturday, a soldier atop one tank extended an arm and helped him climb aboard. They embraced and posed for a picture. "He's my cousin," Ahmed said, laughing. He said he has 10 other relatives serving in the military. "I asked him if the army had orders to attack us. He said, 'You're family. How can we harm our family?'" In stark contrast to the ugly clashes between Egyptian police officers and protesters, the nation's soldiers were greeted like rock stars when they moved into Cairo's restive streets.
OPINION
November 11, 2009 | TIM RUTTEN
There is a profound difference between watchfulness and a witch hunt. In the aftermath of the Ft. Hood shootings, that's a crucial distinction, though nothing the authorities -- and particularly the U.S. Army brass -- have said so far has done much to help people make it. In fact, after Monday's revelations concerning the botched federal investigation into Maj. Nidal Malik Hasan's repeated contacts with a notorious jihadi imam, the military's initial...
WORLD
July 24, 2010 | By David S. Cloud, Los Angeles Times
Gen. Stanley A. McChrystal said goodbye to the Army on Friday in a poignant ceremony that paid tribute to his three decades of military service and barely mentioned his firing by President Obama for insubordination. It was McChrystal who alluded most directly to his own precipitous fall, standing at the podium and looking out at formations of soldiers and former comrades. "Service in this business is tough and often dangerous, and it extracts a price for participation, and that price can be high," McChrystal said.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 29, 2010 | By Pete Metzger
Even though Army of Two: The 40th Day improves on its predecessor in nearly every way, this action war game won't make anyone put down Modern Warfare 2 any time soon. In the first outing, released in 2008, the great concept of playing as part of a tandem of mercenaries out to get rich by killing enemies was ruined by the lousy artificial intelligence your partner had. Any place you wanted to be, he would stand, ratcheting up the frustration levels. Add that to a forgettable story and mediocre controls and you wonder why the game was such a success and a sequel was even considered.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 16, 2009 | By Teresa Watanabe
On a chilly Saturday morning this month, the future soldiers of the U.S. Army huffed and puffed through push-ups, sit-ups and stretches in Whittier Narrows Regional Park in South El Monte. There was the gangly white kid with the blond buzz cut and the buffed-out Latino dude, head draped in a black bandanna. And then there was Jennifer Ren, small, slight and bespectacled, an immigrant from China who gamely kept up with the guys and sees the Army as a ticket to U.S. citizenship and a job in accounting and finance.
NEWS
April 24, 1987 | Associated Press
The Army acknowledged today that 12 Bradley Fighting Vehicles have sunk during amphibious testing, nearly double the number previously reported, but it denied a congressman's assertion that the combat personnel carrier "leaks like a sieve." As recently as last week, the Army said there had been only seven sinkings of the armored vehicles. But Army Under Secretary James R.
NEWS
January 24, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
The army struck back at Hutu insurgents in northwestern Rwanda, killing as many as 350 people in a series of attacks, aid workers and residents said. The military operations were intended to flush out Hutu militants accused of slaying 50 people, including three Spanish aid workers.
NEWS
June 7, 1989 | From Associated Press
A military court Tuesday acquitted an army major of charges that he took part in an attempt to overthrow the government of Philippine President Corazon Aquino in 1987. The five-member military tribunal said the prosecution failed to produce evidence that Maj. Horacio Lactao disregarded lawful orders from a superior officer.
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