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Arnold Schoenberg Institute

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April 27, 1989 | BRUCE BURROUGHS
Antoinette Perry brought exceptional artistry as percussionist to her Tuesday night recital in the Arnold Schoenberg Institute at USC. Acknowledging pianist Perry thus merely underscores the perspective of her challenging program. In music of Schoenberg, Bartok, Shostakovich, George Crumb and Donald Keats, Perry exploited those possibilities of the piano that graphically emphasize its historic assignation to the percussion family of instruments. And she did so with the same intense care and respect that she has brought to Mozart and Beethoven.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 28, 1997 | DIANE HAITHMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Vienna's Arnold Schonberg Center--new headquarters for the Arnold Schoenberg Institute, which made its home at USC for 14 years--will celebrate its opening with nine days of ceremonies, receptions and concerts of music by the 20th century composer and his disciples beginning March 11.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 16, 1987 | DANIEL CARIAGA, Times Music Writer
With an average age of less than 33 years, the four members of the decade-old American String Quartet are too young an ensemble to have had any direct connection with Arnold Schoenberg. Indeed, at the time the composer died, in the summer of 1951, only one of the members of the quartet had been born.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 31, 1996 | MARK SWED, TIMES MUSIC CRITIC
No matter the emphatic partying or quantities of champagne consumed, year's end is invariably a time of reflection and sadness. One remembers what no longer is, and those losses seem to matter more than the year's gains or triumphs. So the fact that the announcement came last week that the heirs of Arnold Schoenberg, the great composer, were packing up their late father's manuscripts and shipping them off to Vienna hit particularly hard.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 5, 1985 | DANIEL CARIAGA, Times Music Writer
"Clarinetists are organizers," claims David Ocker, a clarinetist who is also a composer and who demonstrates his achievement in both occupations in a New Music America '85 event Wednesday afternoon at 5 at the Arnold Schoenberg Institute at USC. By way of documentation, the bearded musician points to his several years' service as general factotum of the Independent Composers Assn., and his seven-year employment as copyist/librarian/computer programmer by another active composer, Frank Zappa.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 13, 1991 | DANIEL CARIAGA, Daniel Cariaga is a Times staff writer.
Leonard Stein, director of the Arnold Schoenberg Institute at USC, gives his last performance in that capacity this week. He announced his retirement during a recent interview at the university. After 16 years as head of the institute, Stein says, without rancor, "Enough is enough." Appointed director in 1975, the genial pianist/conductor, who served as teaching assistant to Schoenberg before the composer's death in 1951, oversaw the opening of the USC facility in 1977.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 23, 1990 | DANIEL CARIAGA
At the Arnold Schoenberg Institute, a season-long survey of "Artists in Exile: From Nazi Germany to America" will get under way Oct. 17 with the opening of the exhibit, "From the Old World to the New World: Schoenberg's Emigration to America." Concerts, lectures and seminars are part of the survey, continuing through June on the USC campus, home of the institute.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 28, 1997 | DIANE HAITHMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Vienna's Arnold Schonberg Center--new headquarters for the Arnold Schoenberg Institute, which made its home at USC for 14 years--will celebrate its opening with nine days of ceremonies, receptions and concerts of music by the 20th century composer and his disciples beginning March 11.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 28, 1996 | DIANE HAITHMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Arnold Schoenberg collection, donated to USC in 1973 by the famous composer's heirs, was supposed to be a Southern California cultural archive for the ages. But now that the collection will be leaving USC--after disagreements between the university and the heirs over the treatment of the massive cache of scores, manuscripts, photos and memorabilia--the Schoenberg family says the search for permanent security for the Schoenberg Institute will most likely lead to Europe.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 31, 1996 | MARK SWED, TIMES MUSIC CRITIC
No matter the emphatic partying or quantities of champagne consumed, year's end is invariably a time of reflection and sadness. One remembers what no longer is, and those losses seem to matter more than the year's gains or triumphs. So the fact that the announcement came last week that the heirs of Arnold Schoenberg, the great composer, were packing up their late father's manuscripts and shipping them off to Vienna hit particularly hard.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 28, 1996 | DIANE HAITHMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Arnold Schoenberg collection, donated to USC in 1973 by the famous composer's heirs, was supposed to be a Southern California cultural archive for the ages. But now that the collection will be leaving USC--after disagreements between the university and the heirs over the treatment of the massive cache of scores, manuscripts, photos and memorabilia--the Schoenberg family says the search for permanent security for the Schoenberg Institute will most likely lead to Europe.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 13, 1991 | DANIEL CARIAGA, Daniel Cariaga is a Times staff writer.
Leonard Stein, director of the Arnold Schoenberg Institute at USC, gives his last performance in that capacity this week. He announced his retirement during a recent interview at the university. After 16 years as head of the institute, Stein says, without rancor, "Enough is enough." Appointed director in 1975, the genial pianist/conductor, who served as teaching assistant to Schoenberg before the composer's death in 1951, oversaw the opening of the USC facility in 1977.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 23, 1990 | DANIEL CARIAGA
At the Arnold Schoenberg Institute, a season-long survey of "Artists in Exile: From Nazi Germany to America" will get under way Oct. 17 with the opening of the exhibit, "From the Old World to the New World: Schoenberg's Emigration to America." Concerts, lectures and seminars are part of the survey, continuing through June on the USC campus, home of the institute.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 1989 | BRUCE BURROUGHS
Antoinette Perry brought exceptional artistry as percussionist to her Tuesday night recital in the Arnold Schoenberg Institute at USC. Acknowledging pianist Perry thus merely underscores the perspective of her challenging program. In music of Schoenberg, Bartok, Shostakovich, George Crumb and Donald Keats, Perry exploited those possibilities of the piano that graphically emphasize its historic assignation to the percussion family of instruments. And she did so with the same intense care and respect that she has brought to Mozart and Beethoven.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 16, 1987 | DANIEL CARIAGA, Times Music Writer
With an average age of less than 33 years, the four members of the decade-old American String Quartet are too young an ensemble to have had any direct connection with Arnold Schoenberg. Indeed, at the time the composer died, in the summer of 1951, only one of the members of the quartet had been born.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 5, 1985 | DANIEL CARIAGA, Times Music Writer
"Clarinetists are organizers," claims David Ocker, a clarinetist who is also a composer and who demonstrates his achievement in both occupations in a New Music America '85 event Wednesday afternoon at 5 at the Arnold Schoenberg Institute at USC. By way of documentation, the bearded musician points to his several years' service as general factotum of the Independent Composers Assn., and his seven-year employment as copyist/librarian/computer programmer by another active composer, Frank Zappa.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 15, 1991 | BETH KLEID, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Stein Recovering: Pianist Leonard Stein, director of the Arnold Schoenberg Institute at USC, had a mild heart attack over the weekend. The 74-year-old musician is recuperating, but his recital at the Institute tonight with violinist Rose Mary Harbison will be rescheduled for February.
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