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Aromatase Inhibitors

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NEWS
July 12, 2010 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times
More than 100,000 women each year are diagnosed with a type of breast cancer called postmenopausal estrogen receptor-positive -- the most common type of breast cancer. Studies in recent years have shown that an important tool to prevent recurrence of this type of breast cancer lies in the use of medications called aromatase inhibitors. On Monday, cancer experts issued guidelines updating the knowledge about aromatase inhibitors -- which are medications that lower estrogen -- and how women and their doctors should best utilize this class of drugs.
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NEWS
January 6, 2012 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times/For the Booster Shots Blog
In a study suggesting that red wine might be the next big thing in breast cancer prevention, a study has found that women who drank just under two servings of red wine daily experienced hormonal changes that mimic the effects of a drug used to prevent malignant breast tumors from coming back. The study, published Friday in the Journal of Women's Health, found that consuming the same amount of white wine did not have the same effect in premenopausal women participating in the study.
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NEWS
October 10, 2011 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Breast cancer patients who take drugs called aromatase inhibitors can experience a decline in bone density. However, a new study shows that adding an osteoporosis drug to their medication regimen prevents the bone loss. Aromatase inhibitors halt estrogen production in postmenopausal women, which is good for stopping the growth of cancer cells. But the loss of estrogen harms bone health and these patients are at higher risk for bone loss and fractures. In the new study, from the University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, women taking aromatase inhibitors were either prescribed the osteoporosis drug zoledronic acid (also known as Zometa)
NEWS
October 10, 2011 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Breast cancer patients who take drugs called aromatase inhibitors can experience a decline in bone density. However, a new study shows that adding an osteoporosis drug to their medication regimen prevents the bone loss. Aromatase inhibitors halt estrogen production in postmenopausal women, which is good for stopping the growth of cancer cells. But the loss of estrogen harms bone health and these patients are at higher risk for bone loss and fractures. In the new study, from the University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, women taking aromatase inhibitors were either prescribed the osteoporosis drug zoledronic acid (also known as Zometa)
NEWS
January 25, 2011 | Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times
The breast cancer drug tamoxifen may stall the progression of non-small cell lung cancer in those who take it after breast cancer treatment, a new study has found. Tamoxifen is the oldest of a wide array of medications that block the action of the hormone estrogen in the body. Researchers have found growing evidence in recent years that the majority of non-small cell lung cancers -- the most common form of lung cancer -- respond to estrogen with growth. So they wondered whether women taking tamoxifen as an adjunct to their breast cancer treatment might be less likely to develop or die of lung cancer.
NEWS
January 6, 2012 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times/For the Booster Shots Blog
In a study suggesting that red wine might be the next big thing in breast cancer prevention, a study has found that women who drank just under two servings of red wine daily experienced hormonal changes that mimic the effects of a drug used to prevent malignant breast tumors from coming back. The study, published Friday in the Journal of Women's Health, found that consuming the same amount of white wine did not have the same effect in premenopausal women participating in the study.
HEALTH
June 5, 2011 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
A drug already used to treat breast cancer can reduce the risk of tumors in high- and moderate-risk post-menopausal women by 65% over a three-year period, researchers reported Saturday. Two other drugs are already approved for reducing the risk of breast tumors in healthy women: Generic tamoxifen reduces the risk by 50% over a five-year period and raloxifene (Evista) reduces the risk by 38% over a similar period. But both drugs are associated with an increased risk of potentially fatal uterine cancer and blood clots.
HEALTH
October 4, 2010 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times
The millions of Americans who take a pill each day to drive down their cholesterol or blood pressure do not generally think of themselves as "sick. " They believe that they are treating one thing ? high cholesterol or blood pressure ? and helping to prevent something worse: a heart attack or stroke. For women who worry about becoming the oft-quoted "1 in 8" who will develop breast cancer in her lifetime, two well-established drugs can do for breast cancer what statins and blood pressure drugs do for heart attacks and strokes: drive down their odds of happening.
NATIONAL
December 29, 2005 | Delthia Ricks, Newsday
Post- menopausal women have another option to treat early-stage breast cancer with the approval Wednesday of a drug aimed at stopping recurrences. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved Femara, a medication manufactured by Novartis Pharmaceuticals and belonging to the class called aromatase inhibitors. Femara already is approved for post-menopausal women with advanced breast cancer.
HEALTH
March 22, 2004 | Jane E. Allen, Times Staff Writer
Tamoxifen has long been the standard treatment for post-menopausal women after breast cancer surgery, but the drawbacks are considerable: It provides benefits for only five years, sometimes stops working earlier and boosts risks of endometrial cancer and stroke. A new class of drugs may become a better option. Three studies in the past year have shown that drugs called aromatase inhibitors are better at preventing cancer recurrences.
HEALTH
June 5, 2011 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
A drug already used to treat breast cancer can reduce the risk of tumors in high- and moderate-risk post-menopausal women by 65% over a three-year period, researchers reported Saturday. Two other drugs are already approved for reducing the risk of breast tumors in healthy women: Generic tamoxifen reduces the risk by 50% over a five-year period and raloxifene (Evista) reduces the risk by 38% over a similar period. But both drugs are associated with an increased risk of potentially fatal uterine cancer and blood clots.
NEWS
January 25, 2011 | Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times
The breast cancer drug tamoxifen may stall the progression of non-small cell lung cancer in those who take it after breast cancer treatment, a new study has found. Tamoxifen is the oldest of a wide array of medications that block the action of the hormone estrogen in the body. Researchers have found growing evidence in recent years that the majority of non-small cell lung cancers -- the most common form of lung cancer -- respond to estrogen with growth. So they wondered whether women taking tamoxifen as an adjunct to their breast cancer treatment might be less likely to develop or die of lung cancer.
HEALTH
October 4, 2010 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times
The millions of Americans who take a pill each day to drive down their cholesterol or blood pressure do not generally think of themselves as "sick. " They believe that they are treating one thing ? high cholesterol or blood pressure ? and helping to prevent something worse: a heart attack or stroke. For women who worry about becoming the oft-quoted "1 in 8" who will develop breast cancer in her lifetime, two well-established drugs can do for breast cancer what statins and blood pressure drugs do for heart attacks and strokes: drive down their odds of happening.
NEWS
July 12, 2010 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times
More than 100,000 women each year are diagnosed with a type of breast cancer called postmenopausal estrogen receptor-positive -- the most common type of breast cancer. Studies in recent years have shown that an important tool to prevent recurrence of this type of breast cancer lies in the use of medications called aromatase inhibitors. On Monday, cancer experts issued guidelines updating the knowledge about aromatase inhibitors -- which are medications that lower estrogen -- and how women and their doctors should best utilize this class of drugs.
HEALTH
January 29, 2007 | Shari Roan, Times Staff Writer
New drugs developed in the last decade can dramatically cut the chances that breast cancer will return. But as many as one-third of women stop taking the drugs before the end of the recommended five-year course of therapy, often because of the side effects. The poor compliance worries doctors, who say women could be reducing their chance of survival. "These are lifesaving drugs for these women," says Dr.
SCIENCE
December 9, 2004 | Thomas H. Maugh II, Times Staff Writer
A new family of drugs known as aromatase inhibitors is more effective at treating breast cancer in older women than the current gold-standard drug, tamoxifen, researchers said Wednesday. The drugs also reduced recurrence of the disease and eliminated the most severe side effects associated with breast cancer treatment.
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