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OPINION
March 12, 2006
Re "Treaties shouldn't trump U.S. law," Opinion, March 8 Although Julian Ku hopes that the Supreme Court will not require police to refer foreign arrestees to their consulate representatives, the same argument means that Americans arrested abroad will be deprived of a similar right. In 2005, the Bush administration denounced the Vienna convention to which Ku refers, raising a similar question. Perhaps Ku and President Bush should attend another screening of the movie "Midnight Express" to refresh their memories of Americans being arrested by foreign governments and denied competent legal representation.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
December 15, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
The Supreme Court erred grievously this year when it permitted Maryland police to collect DNA samples from people who had been arrested and charged with serious crimes - samples that could then be used to match that person's genetic profile with evidence from unrelated unsolved crimes. As Justice Antonin Scalia pointed out in a scathing dissent, the 5-4 decision upholding Maryland's law undermined the 4th Amendment's ban on "searching a person for evidence of a crime when there is no basis for believing the person is guilty of the crime.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 17, 2013 | Cindy Chang
If Gov. Jerry Brown signs legislation known as the Trust Act, federal immigration authorities will have a somewhat harder time taking custody of people in local jails who are suspected of being in the country illegally. The measure, which would prohibit local jailers from holding most arrestees for an additional 48 hours before federal authorities arrive, is not expected to put a large dent in the number of deportations. But with a revamp of immigration laws stalled in Washington, immigrant rights advocates hope to send a message that most deportation should end. Along with a bill granting driver's licenses to more immigrants who are in the country illegally, the Trust Act would cement California's position as one of the states most hospitable to such immigrants.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 17, 2013 | Cindy Chang
If Gov. Jerry Brown signs legislation known as the Trust Act, federal immigration authorities will have a somewhat harder time taking custody of people in local jails who are suspected of being in the country illegally. The measure, which would prohibit local jailers from holding most arrestees for an additional 48 hours before federal authorities arrive, is not expected to put a large dent in the number of deportations. But with a revamp of immigration laws stalled in Washington, immigrant rights advocates hope to send a message that most deportation should end. Along with a bill granting driver's licenses to more immigrants who are in the country illegally, the Trust Act would cement California's position as one of the states most hospitable to such immigrants.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 2, 2011 | By Kate Linthicum and Ben Welsh, Los Angeles Times
More than 200 people arrested during the Occupy L.A. sweep remained in jail Thursday night, drawing protests from civil right attorneys who said many may not face charges and should be freed immediately. As the total of nearly 300 arrestees began moving through the criminal justice system, Los Angeles Police Department records offered a more detailed portrait of those involved in the final throes of the two-month demonstration. They show that the arrestees skewed young, white and male, but included a wide spectrum of races and ages.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 6, 2001
The Anaheim Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS) program should be expanded. It's a catastrophe that an INS agent is not screening arrestees 24 hours a day. Remember, authorities are not seeking out individuals who appear to be illegal. When a suspect is arrested, he is asked about his citizenship status. If he is in these United States illegally, then the deportation process commences. Anaheim's message should be: If an illegal immigrant attempts to commit a crime in Anaheim, then he may be deported to his country of origin.
OPINION
December 6, 2012
Los Angeles County Sheriff Lee Baca has spent the better part of the past year insisting that a controversial federal immigration program known as Secure Communities requires him to hold anyone suspected of being in the country illegally, if called on to do so by U.S. officials. But in fact, it does not. Compliance is optional, and on Wednesday, the Sheriff's Department conceded as much, announcing that in light of a new legal directive from California Atty. Gen. Kamala Harris, it will no longer detain or hand over illegal immigrants arrested for minor offenses.
OPINION
January 27, 1985
I'm quite upset with The Times. I mean, I just can't understand it. Every time I read an article about adding more police to the Los Angeles police force, you people don't explain what we're going to do with all the people those new police are going to arrest. Since every politician hereabouts knows that the courts, Probation Department, health service agencies, mental health service agencies, the jails and the prisons are already overcrowded, it would be clear that our esteemed political leaders would obviously have thought in great depth about how we were going to deal with all our new arrestees.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 1992
Recent news stories regarding the early release of a convicted drunk-driver have stirred significant interest in and anger toward the county's criminal justice system. I can understand and appreciate these emotions; I only wish they would be stirred more often. Due to jail overcrowding, law enforcement agencies throughout the county constantly cite and release or book and release arrestees instead of sending them to jail. Thirty-eight percent of arrestees booked and released are rearrested prior to their case disposition.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 18, 1991 | AARON CURTISS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Los Angeles police reserve officer who is confined to a wheelchair received one of the department's highest awards Wednesday for helping to develop a program used to immediately book and release arrestees in the field. Charles Mason, 46, of Van Nuys was presented with the Meritorious Service Medal in his bed at Northridge Hospital Medical Center, where he is in therapy for multiple sclerosis.
OPINION
December 6, 2012
Los Angeles County Sheriff Lee Baca has spent the better part of the past year insisting that a controversial federal immigration program known as Secure Communities requires him to hold anyone suspected of being in the country illegally, if called on to do so by U.S. officials. But in fact, it does not. Compliance is optional, and on Wednesday, the Sheriff's Department conceded as much, announcing that in light of a new legal directive from California Atty. Gen. Kamala Harris, it will no longer detain or hand over illegal immigrants arrested for minor offenses.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 18, 2012 | By Robert Faturechi and Jack Leonard, Los Angeles Times
Along with his Taser, baton and handgun, Los Angeles County sheriff's Det. David Huelsen has a new tool for meting out justice: a point-and-shoot camera. The Malibu traffic detective is among a handful of cops the Sheriff's Department has equipped with digital cameras as part of an effort to reduce the number of innocent people jailed after being mistaken for wanted criminals. The reforms come after a Times investigation detailed how authorities in the county had incarcerated people mistaken for wanted criminals more than 1,480 times over five years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 26, 2012 | By Maura Dolan, Los Angeles Times
A federal appeals court will take a second look at a California law that requires police to collect DNA from people who are arrested on suspicion of felonies, regardless of whether they are convicted. A majority of judges on the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals voted Wednesday to reconsider a split decision by a three-judge panel that had upheld the program in February. The court's decision to ask an 11-judge panel to consider the case was a setback for prosecutors, who have defended the DNA collection as a vital crime-fighting tool.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 28, 2012 | By Paloma Esquivel, Los Angeles Times
A bill being drafted by a state legislator would limit local law enforcement from holding arrestees on behalf of immigration authorities seeking to deport them. Assemblyman Tom Ammiano (D-San Francisco) said he is finalizing amendments to a bill that would be the first statewide measure to counter the Secure Communities enforcement program, which requires law enforcement agencies to forward to immigration authorities the fingerprints of all arrestees booked into local jails. If those authorities identify a candidate for deportation, they can issue a detainer, which asks the agency to hold them beyond the time when they would normally be released so immigration agents can take custody.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 3, 2011 | By Ricardo Lopez, Los Angeles Time
Three days after Los Angeles police evicted Occupy L.A. protesters from City Hall Park, most of the nearly 200 who remained in jail were released Friday because they had otherwise clean criminal records. In all, nearly 300 were arrested early Wednesday when 1,400 officers broke up the 7-week-old encampment surrounding City Hall. They initially faced a minimum bail of $5,000, and about 40 had been bailed out Thursday. Scores of arrestees trickled out of Central Arraignment Court, across from the downtown Men's Central Jail, Friday afternoon after being processed and released.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 2, 2011 | By Kate Linthicum and Ben Welsh, Los Angeles Times
More than 200 people arrested during the Occupy L.A. sweep remained in jail Thursday night, drawing protests from civil right attorneys who said many may not face charges and should be freed immediately. As the total of nearly 300 arrestees began moving through the criminal justice system, Los Angeles Police Department records offered a more detailed portrait of those involved in the final throes of the two-month demonstration. They show that the arrestees skewed young, white and male, but included a wide spectrum of races and ages.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 3, 2011 | By Ricardo Lopez, Los Angeles Time
Three days after Los Angeles police evicted Occupy L.A. protesters from City Hall Park, most of the nearly 200 who remained in jail were released Friday because they had otherwise clean criminal records. In all, nearly 300 were arrested early Wednesday when 1,400 officers broke up the 7-week-old encampment surrounding City Hall. They initially faced a minimum bail of $5,000, and about 40 had been bailed out Thursday. Scores of arrestees trickled out of Central Arraignment Court, across from the downtown Men's Central Jail, Friday afternoon after being processed and released.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 9, 1990
Thank you for your insightful editorial calling for immediate action toward building a new Orange County Jail ("Time to Deal in Jail Realities," Aug. 22). As Orange County's chief law enforcement officer and as the administrator of the Orange County Jail system, I can tell you that the lack of jail space is the most devastating threat to public safety in Orange County today. Our criminal justice system is rapidly becoming a revolving door. Criminals either are arrested, brought to the jail for booking and released for lack of room to hold them or they are released weeks before the end of their sentences to make room for more dangerous arrestees.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 31, 2011 | By Michael J. Mishak, Los Angeles Times
Reporting from Sacramento -- California lawmakers have taken steps to opt out of a controversial federal immigration enforcement program, joining a growing number of states that say it harms public safety and undermines local law enforcement. Under the Secure Communities program, fingerprints of all arrestees booked into local jails and cross-checked with the FBI's criminal database are forwarded to Immigration and Customs Enforcement for screening. Officials said the system, launched in 2008, is intended to identify and deport illegal immigrants convicted of serious crimes such as murder, rape and kidnapping.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 26, 2011 | By Paloma Esquivel and Lee Romney, Los Angeles Times
Adding their voices to a growing number of opponents, Los Angeles City Councilman Bernard C. Parks and Councilwoman Jan Perry have called on the city to support limiting the scope of local participation in a controversial federal deportation program. The City Council resolution proposed Tuesday on the Secure Communities program comes as San Francisco County prepares to implement a new policy seeking to do the same. On Wednesday, law enforcement officials, including Yolo County Sheriff Ed Prieto, held a national news conference to outline their concerns about the federal program.
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