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Arsen Djavadian

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SPORTS
January 29, 1992 | THERESA MUNOZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Armenian diver Arsen Djavadian couldn't choose between UCLA and USC. As it turned out, he didn't have to. Fearing that an NCAA rule violation by UCLA swimming Coach Ron Ballatore would cost him his eligibility at UCLA, Djavadian decided to attend USC. "For me, I make a decision to go to USC because probably there will be some problems with going to UCLA," Djavadian said. The problems began when Djavadian enrolled in an English-as-a-second-language class at UCLA extension Jan. 7.
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SPORTS
January 29, 1992 | THERESA MUNOZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Armenian diver Arsen Djavadian couldn't choose between UCLA and USC. As it turned out, he didn't have to. Fearing that an NCAA rule violation by UCLA swimming Coach Ron Ballatore would cost him his eligibility at UCLA, Djavadian decided to attend USC. "For me, I make a decision to go to USC because probably there will be some problems with going to UCLA," Djavadian said. The problems began when Djavadian enrolled in an English-as-a-second-language class at UCLA extension Jan. 7.
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SPORTS
January 24, 1992 | THERESA MUNOZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Arsen Djavadian, the man without a country, is caught in another web. This time, it's between UCLA and USC. Djavadian, who defected from Soviet Armenia in July 1990 during the Goodwill Games, is seeking asylum and looking for a local college to dive for. UCLA and USC have vied for the talented tower specialist, but the Bruins might lose by default.
SPORTS
January 24, 1992 | THERESA MUNOZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Arsen Djavadian, the man without a country, is caught in another web. This time, it's between UCLA and USC. Djavadian, who defected from Soviet Armenia in July 1990 during the Goodwill Games, is seeking asylum and looking for a local college to dive for. UCLA and USC have vied for the talented tower specialist, but the Bruins might lose by default.
SPORTS
October 25, 1990 | THERESA MUNOZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The FBI agent told him there would be no turning back and no guarantee of asylum, but Arsen Djavadian felt he had no choice. The Soviet diver fled the Goodwill Games in Seattle with the help of a stranger, then hid out in Hollywood with a boyhood friend from his native Armenia. Until last weekend, when he received employment authorization, Djavadian (Ja-VAD-ee-an) was afraid to tell his story for fear that he would be sent back to the Soviet Union. Djavadian's defection was not without cost.
SPORTS
December 17, 1991 | THERESA MUNOZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Arsen Djavadian came to the United States with a rug, a swimsuit and an eye out for the KGB. It was his desire to live here and compete as a diver on the U.S. Olympic team. But the rug, politically speaking, has been pulled from under him. He is drowning in red tape, and Djavadian (pronounced Ja-VAD-ee-an) cannot understand why everything is so complicated. In a best-case scenario--barring an act of Congress--he will not be able to dive for the U.S.
SPORTS
November 6, 1991 | THERESA MUNOZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Arsen Djavadian came to the United States with a rug, a swimsuit and an eye out for the KGB. It was his desire to live here and compete as a diver on the U.S. Olympic team. But the rug, politically speaking, has been pulled from under Djavadian (Ja-VAD-ee-an) and he is drowning in red tape. He cannot understand why his dream is so complicated. At best--barring an act of Congress--he will not be able to dive for the U.S. Olympic team until the year 2000, when he will be 33 years old.
SPORTS
February 24, 1993 | THERESA MUNOZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ron Ballatore is the ugliest swimming coach in America and his UCLA Bruins wear a T-shirt to prove it. Below a picture of a bug-eyed Ballatore grabbing his ears and scrunching his face, the caption reads: "Just Another Pretty Face." A raging screamer and a surrogate father, Ballatore inspires uncommon loyalty with an unusual blend of hardness and humor. As a former assistant pointed out, "His swimmers want to kill him. They would also swim through a wall for him."
SPORTS
December 17, 1991 | THERESA MUNOZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Arsen Djavadian came to the United States with a rug, a swimsuit and an eye out for the KGB. It was his desire to live here and compete as a diver on the U.S. Olympic team. But the rug, politically speaking, has been pulled from under him. He is drowning in red tape, and Djavadian (pronounced Ja-VAD-ee-an) cannot understand why everything is so complicated. In a best-case scenario--barring an act of Congress--he will not be able to dive for the U.S.
SPORTS
October 25, 1990 | THERESA MUNOZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The FBI agent told him there would be no turning back and no guarantee of asylum, but Arsen Djavadian felt he had no choice. The Soviet diver fled the Goodwill Games in Seattle with the help of a stranger, then hid out in Hollywood with a boyhood friend from his native Armenia. Until last weekend, when he received employment authorization, Djavadian (Ja-VAD-ee-an) was afraid to tell his story for fear that he would be sent back to the Soviet Union. Djavadian's defection was not without cost.
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