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Arsenic

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 29, 2008 | Michael Rothfeld
Beside a field of rolling tumbleweed in this remote Central Valley town, the state opened its newest prison in 2005 with a modern design, cutting-edge security features and a serious environmental problem. The drinking water pumped from two wells at Kern Valley State Prison contained arsenic, a known cause of cancer, in amounts far higher than a federal safety standard soon to take effect.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 2, 2007 | Rong-Gong Lin II, Times Staff Writer
For generations, bottled mineral water from the town of Jermuk has been a kind of national tonic in Armenia, proudly sipped like a fine chardonnay in California or taken for its perceived medicinal value, like chicken soup. As the Armenian population here has grown, demand for the water has grown with it.
NEWS
November 8, 2001 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A study of commonly used pressure-treated lumber purchased at home improvement stores nationwide suggests that the risk of arsenic exposure from the boards is higher than previously feared, an environmental organization said Wednesday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 19, 1999 | KRISTINA SAUERWEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Soil tests have found above-average levels of arsenic at the Valerio Primary Center, prompting further tests but most likely not delaying the school's fall opening, officials said Friday. The levels of the metallic carcinogen detected are not high enough to pose health risks, agriculture experts and Los Angeles Unified School District officials said.
NEWS
March 21, 2001 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
EPA Administrator Christie Whitman on Tuesday rescinded a Clinton administration decision that would have significantly reduced the amount of arsenic allowed in the nation's drinking water. Outraged environmentalists said the move, combined with other recent actions, signals a new tendency by Bush administration officials to appease industry rather than safeguard public health and the environment.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 15, 2001 | DEBORAH SCHOCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
New evidence suggests that arsenic in drinking water could be more hazardous than earlier thought--a finding that could shape new standards for drinking water in California and nationwide. Even minute amounts of arsenic in drinking water could lead to higher rates of lung and bladder cancer than initial research showed, according to a study released this week by the National Academy of Sciences.
SCIENCE
December 2, 2010 | By Eryn Brown and Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
After days of rampant speculation that NASA was on the cusp of revealing it had detected extraterrestrial life, the reality was slightly more down-to-Earth. A team of scientists revealed Thursday that they had found a remarkable quality in a bacterium growing quietly in California's Mono Lake ? it is the only known life form able to subsist on the deadly element arsenic. The organism even uses arsenic to build the backbone of its DNA. To researchers searching for life elsewhere in the universe, the discovery still qualified as a heaven-sent event.
NEWS
March 11, 1995 | FRANK CLIFFORD, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
For many residents of the California gold country, the abandoned ore mills and rusting mine machinery that dot the green hills are cherished icons of a storied past. The relics are part of the lure of the Sierra Nevada foothills, where the look and feel of the Gold Rush era has helped attract thousands of new residents, making it one of the state's fastest-growing regions in the last decade.
NEWS
April 19, 2001 | From Associated Press
The Bush administration, under fire for scrapping former President Clinton's standard for arsenic in drinking water, said Wednesday it would set a new standard within nine months. Christie Whitman, administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency, said she is asking the National Academy of Sciences to examine the effect of a range of possible reductions. The new standard could be higher or lower than that set by Clinton.
NEWS
June 29, 2001 | ANUJ GUPTA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An environmental group filed a lawsuit Thursday against the Environmental Protection Agency for missing a congressional deadline to impose new standards for arsenic in drinking water. A number of Democratic senators, including Barbara Boxer of California, Hillary Rodham Clinton of New York and Harry Reid of Nevada, immediately endorsed the group's litigation.
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