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NEWS
March 3, 2005 | Liane Bonin, Special to The Times
Green eggs and ham, a cat in the hat and ... "unorthodox" taxidermy? If that last entry in the Dr. Seuss pantheon seems a tad "Silence of the Lambs" for your taste, take heart: Though "The Art of Dr. Seuss: A Retrospective and National Touring Exhibition" at the Sarah Bain Gallery in Brea promises to reveal the "secret" art of the famed children's book author, what's on display is simply grown-up stuff, not nightmare material. Not surprisingly, Dr. Seuss, a.k.a.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 27, 2014 | By Esmeralda Bermudez
Getting the strangers to open up wasn't easy. But Jesus Rodriguez, a high school senior, pressed on, clipboard and questionnaire in hand. He and about 15 other students spent Thursday evening at MacArthur Park, interviewing people about their lives, their well-being and the health of their neighborhood. Their responses will be the basis for an intricate art installation to be displayed at the park in the fall. For Rodriguez, 18, the exercise was eye-opening. He spent two hours approaching random men and women, some of them homeless.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 21, 2012 | By Reed Johnson, Los Angeles Times
Along with millions of idealistic young men who were cut to pieces by machine guns and obliterated by artillery shells, there was another major casualty of World War I: traditional ideas about Western art. The Great War of 1914-18 tilted culture on its axis, particularly in Europe and the United States. Nearly 100 years later, that legacy is being wrestled with in film, visual art, music, television shows like the gauzily nostalgic PBS soaper "Downton Abbey" and plays including the Tony Award-winning"War Horse," concluding its run at the Ahmanson Theatre.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 26, 2014 | Martha Groves
The Fine Arts Theater in Beverly Hills, a classic Art Deco venue with a celebrity-studded past, has been sold to Paula Kent Meehan, the philanthropist who also is buying the Beverly Hills Courier. Built on Wilshire Boulevard in 1936 as the Regina, the compact, single-screen theater served for years as a venue for small premieres that drew Hollywood A-listers. In 1948, it was renamed the Fine Arts Theater and showed the premiere of "The Red Shoes. " Among the invited guests were Susan Hayward, Joan Crawford, Ava Gardner and Shirley Temple.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 2012
Get your art on at the biannual Brewery Art Walk, which is held in what is being dubbed the "world's largest art complex. " With more than 100 artists in residence, this massive former beer brewing company complex offers something for every genre of art enthusiast, as well as plenty of entertainment and refreshments. The Brewery, 2100 N. Main St., L.A. Free. 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Sat. and Sun. http://www.breweryartwalk.com.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 30, 2000
"Eames in Name and in Spirit" (by Susan Freudenheim, July 16) was a well-written and informative article about Charles and Ray Eames and their heirs. However, I beg to differ regarding your placing it under the heading "art." The story is about design and designers. Giving it the heading of "art" further confuses those who can't tell the difference between design and art, and misleads the young who are trying to decide on or developing a career. Art is subjective, whimsical and answers to no one but the artist.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 27, 1992 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Time to Move On: Sherri Geldin, associate director of the Museum of Contemporary Art, has submitted her resignation, effective in March. Geldin, who was MOCA's first staff member, said that after 14 years with the museum, she is "propelled to seek new challenges."
ENTERTAINMENT
April 26, 2014 | By Deborah Vankin
The Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival may have wrapped up last week, but still unfurling in Coachella's Pueblo Viejo District is an ambitious project that has brought together about a dozen muralists and international contemporary artists. "Coachella Walls," which has no formal connection to the Goldenvoice-produced festival, is billed as an "arts-driven community revitalization project. " Its organizers are Coachella-based Date Farmers Art Studios, a.k.a., the artists Armando Lerma and Carlos Ramirez, who grew up in the area and now show their work at Ace Gallery in Los Angeles.
NEWS
April 25, 2014 | By Booth Moore, Los Angeles Times Fashion Critic
Brad Pitt, Orlando Bloom, Jodie Foster and many more came out to shop the preview night of Paris Photo Los Angeles , the international art fair open to the public through the weekend at Paramount Studios. On the studio's New York backlot, guests wandered in and out of sound stages, and galleries set up in faux delis and pizza parlors, admiring historical and contemporary works by hundreds of photographers. This year's event features a tribute to actor/director/artist Dennis Hopper , including a display of his photographic work (his portrait of artist Roy Lichtenstein was one of my favorites)
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 2014 | By F. Kathleen Foley
Playwright Bekah Brunstetter is certainly an artful emotional manipulator, as evidenced in “Be a Good Little Widow,” now in its Los Angeles premiere at the NoHo Arts Center. Even though you may be keenly aware that your feelings are being slyly exploited, you just might reach for a hankie anyway. A simple premise suffices for Brunstetter's obvious but nonetheless effective comedy-drama. Up-and-coming corporate attorney Craig (Donovan Patton) is juggling the affections of two women -- his free-spirited new wife, Melody (Larisa Oleynik)
OPINION
April 24, 2014
Re "Are we losing the tech race?," Opinion, April 20 Michael Teitelbaum presents common-sense advice about majoring in science. He echoes what proponents of the liberal arts have been saying for years: that it is not enough to specialize in one area of expertise, and that science students must gain broad intellectual skills developed through the humanities, arts and social sciences. However, I disagree with Teitelbaum's assessment that science education for non-science majors should be limited to K-12.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 2014 | By Deborah Vankin
Two international art fair heavyweights are joining forces: The Foire Internationale d'Art Contemporain, the 40-year-old Paris art show known as FIAC, will formally announce on Friday that its Los Angeles debut will coincide with Paris Photo L.A. in May 2015. FIAC L.A. will debut May 27-31, 2015, at the Los Angeles Convention Center. Paris Photo L.A., which debuted here one year ago at Paramount Studios, will shift from April to May 28-31, 2015. Both events are managed by Reed Expositions France.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 2014 | By Deborah Vankin, Los Angeles Times
The Santa Monica Museum of Art's annual Incognito benefit may be the most democratic of all Los Angeles art world soirees: 700 works for sale by emerging and famous artists alike, all 10 by 10 inches and exactly $350 - with the artists' identities hidden from view until after purchase. But that doesn't mean strategy isn't involved. The event, which turns 10 this year, has become a touchstone for collectors looking to find valuable works by the likes of Barbara Kruger, Raymond Pettibon and Ed Ruscha.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 2014 | By Jason Song
Jonathan Lee stood by the large prints of Ein Liz, a female action figure he'd spent the better part of a year creating. The Art Center College of Design senior hoped his pieces would catch the eye of one of the hundreds of possible employers who would inspect students' work during the annual graduation show last week. The 25-year-old admitted to feeling nervous but tried to temper his expectations as representatives from Disney and Google approached his display. He plans to send resumes later.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 19, 2014 | By Deborah Vankin
Matjames Metson's Silver Lake studio is in a 1930s Art Deco duplex perched atop a steep flight of aging, concrete stairs overlooking a cul-de-sac, which overlooks a hillside, which overlooks a bustling intersection that, from above, appears to be teeming with tiny toy cars and action-figure people. Inside, Metson's dusty, sunlit living room-turned-art studio is also full of tiny treasures. The assemblage artist builds intricate, architectural sculptures, wall hangings and furniture made from his abundant stash of objects, most of which he finds at estate sales.
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