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Art Class

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 22, 1999
Re "Getting Together on Prep Courses," Aug. 11. I have been a teacher for 30 years in the Conejo Unified School District, teaching art and related subjects. I have found several reasons that college prep seniors and juniors do not take fine arts courses. College prep students often are afraid to take visual arts because they are afraid they will not receive an A, which would affect their grade-point average. Additionally, seniors often do not wish to take an art class if it is considered difficult and time-consuming, as in a lab situation.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 29, 2013 | Sandy Banks
The email was an invitation to step back in time, from someone I hadn't seen or talked to since 1965. Joe Migliore had noticed my byline on a column in our hometown paper, the Cleveland Plain Dealer. It was about the shift in racial labels - from Negro to black to African American - during our lifetime. "It was very interesting and brought back some memories of time gone by," he wrote. "I was just wondering if you are the same Sandy Banks that I went to school with at Miles Road Elementary School" nearly 50 years ago. Joe remembered "a girl named Sandra Banks in French class taught by Mrs. Cassanova.
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NEWS
June 1, 1989 | ANNETTE KONDO, Kondo is a free-lance writer who lives in San Gabriel.
Put 5-year-old Kurston Cook in front of a lump of clay and he might make a black widow spider or a caveman. Lately he's been making big, four-legged creatures. His fingers deftly roll out four chubby legs, a body and a long, serpentine neck. He shapes the head and uses a wood tool to form the eyes and a gaping mouth. Was there any special reason for the sculptures? "Because it's fun," Kurston answered while finishing his brontosaurus. "Because I like dinosaurs." Kurston, like many other students at Pacific Oaks College and Children's School in Pasadena, has had special art instruction since he was 2 in a program that introduces young children to clay, silk screen, painting, drawing and crafts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 12, 2012 | By Teresa Watanabe, Los Angeles Times
Backers of a Little Tokyo gymnasium Saturday showcased their long-awaited site for an array of basketball, martial arts and art activities that they hope will revitalize the historic heart of Southern California's Japanese American community. Community volunteers laid out a full-sized high school basketball court over the site, a city-owned parking lot on Los Angeles Street near 2nd Street. Then they led youth athletes, first- to ninth-graders, in a basketball clinic, followed by an Okinawan karate demonstration.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 10, 1993
Blind and visually impaired people can learn to draw and paint in a special class this fall at the Oasis Senior Center. Ed Forshay, a longtime cartoonist and art teacher, will run the class, which is open to beginners with any kind of visual handicap. The class begins today and is held from 10 a.m. to noon. The center is at the corner of Marguerite and 5th avenues. Call (714) 720-1440 for more information.
NEWS
August 16, 1987 | MARY BARBER, Times Staff Writer
The smile that broke up the bored, restless look on Gary Gene's face lasted for two full hours, something of a record at a soup kitchen where 100 hungry people gather every day. The 14-year-old had gone to Union Station with his mother for breakfast, then insisted on staying all morning for an art class. He left after proudly showing off his two paintings and hasn't been seen since.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 7, 1989 | HILLIARD HARPER, San Diego County Arts Writer
It has been two years since the last time Trisha Tierce-Madera tried to kill herself. Standing over a large, watery blue heart she has painted with a jagged brown and black crack through it, she credits a special course of free art classes with helping "center" her in the face of a chronic manic-depressive disorder. For John Blue, art did not rank as a great interest until he contracted a terminal illness.
NEWS
January 4, 2007 | Justin Hampton, Special to The Times
THERE'S no crisis of artistic inspiration that a $5 mojito and a dancer in G-string and pasties can't fix. Just ask the subculturally minded students of Dr. Sketchy's Anti-Art School, an international string of life-drawing classes that has recently established biweekly sessions at the Bungalow Club in Hollywood.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 7, 1989 | HILLIARD HARPER, Times Staff Writer
SAN DIEGO--It sounds like a script right out of a Hollywood movie. In mid-life, a man discovers he's been blessed with exceptional talent as an artist, but only learns this after he is found to have an illness that may soon cut short his life. Except that this isn't fiction. Timothy Grummon, 38, is a former Peace Corps administrator whose illness was diagnosed in 1985 as AIDS-related complex, or ARC.
NEWS
December 23, 2001 | HILARY E. MacGREGOR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Each of the collectible cars parked in the gracious curve of Len Aaron's Beverly Hills driveway is loaded with paintings, ready to go. There are two canvases in the trunk of the blue 1987 Zimmer, and three more in the back of the Jaguar. There are probably a few stashed in the rear of the Testarossa, too. Eighty-four-year-old Aaron, the co-founder and former president of Aaron Bros.--purveyor of frames, framed art, prints and art supplies to the masses--has returned to his business roots.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 5, 2011 | Steve Lopez
I can't think of a better way to begin this column than to let a fellow pundit get things going. So I'll turn things over to Allene Arthur, who's been writing columns for the Palm Springs Desert Sun for 32 years: "Fiftieth high school class reunions are a dime a dozen," Arthur wrote in a note to me recently. "Sixtieth reunions are rare enough to get our attention. But a 70th class reunion is an uncommon big deal. The Manual Arts High School class of Summer, 1941, will hold its 70th on October 3....
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 20, 2009 | Seema Mehta
By the time Josh Brandy graduated from La Canada High School in 2002, he was staying out all night and experimenting with drugs. He grew estranged from his family and started stealing to feed his habit. By the beginning of 2008, Brandy was locked up in jail, facing 14 years in state prison. Less than a year later, the 26-year-old is sober, studying full time at Los Angeles City College and working part time building computers for the music industry.
NEWS
January 4, 2007 | Justin Hampton, Special to The Times
THERE'S no crisis of artistic inspiration that a $5 mojito and a dancer in G-string and pasties can't fix. Just ask the subculturally minded students of Dr. Sketchy's Anti-Art School, an international string of life-drawing classes that has recently established biweekly sessions at the Bungalow Club in Hollywood.
NEWS
September 19, 2002 | MARY BETH FALLER, STAMFORD ADVOCATE
Louise Guy cocks her head as she examines her painting. "Everyone says the green is too bold, but I like it," she says. The watercolor work, of an exotic Hawaiian orchid, is a commission, so she's anxious to make sure it's just right. Guy touches up the leaf during her regular Thursday morning painting class at Edgehill Lifecare Community in Stamford, Conn. The class, taught for two years by Harriet Lacker, has become wildly successful.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 8, 2002 | SUZIE ST. JOHN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
For the last three years, Jahaira Rodriguez has been taking acting, singing, dancing and violin lessons five days a week. With a schedule like that, one would guess that she has her sights set on Hollywood. Guess again. For the 14-year-old west Ventura girl, it's not about the future but more about the past--her Mexican heritage and culture.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 4, 2002 | CLAIRE LUNA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Catherine Ransom rattled off the names of the most famous classical composers she could think of, waiting for the fourth-graders to identify their favorites. But Beethoven, Brahms and Mozart didn't prompt even a flicker of recognition across any of the children's faces at the Hollywood elementary school the professional flutist was visiting as a volunteer.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 29, 1995
I am a 12-year-old boy, and I attend Bell Junior High School. During classes I am constantly being showed the results of the budget crisis. In my art class, we have to be very careful of the amount of paints and other supplies, or else we might get a lower grade. Now, I am not saying that it is your fault that we cannot throw away any paper in my math class, although I am saying that, if possible, schools should be getting more funds than they are presently getting. It is not the children's fault that Orange County is in debt, and we are one of the many innocent facilities suffering.
NEWS
May 1, 1994 | IRIS YOKOI
Michael Javier figures that whether you refer to it as arte, mei shu or bijutsu , art is a universal means of expression that brings together people of different backgrounds, ethnicities and ages. The use of art as expression is natural for immigrants who bring not only a "wealth of culture" from their native lands but also poignant personal tales of leaving their homes and trying to fit into a new country, Javier said.
NEWS
December 23, 2001 | HILARY E. MacGREGOR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Each of the collectible cars parked in the gracious curve of Len Aaron's Beverly Hills driveway is loaded with paintings, ready to go. There are two canvases in the trunk of the blue 1987 Zimmer, and three more in the back of the Jaguar. There are probably a few stashed in the rear of the Testarossa, too. Eighty-four-year-old Aaron, the co-founder and former president of Aaron Bros.--purveyor of frames, framed art, prints and art supplies to the masses--has returned to his business roots.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 26, 2001 | CARLA RIVERA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To gather inspiration for his design of Hollyhock House atop what now is Barnsdall Park, Frank Lloyd Wright wandered among the olive groves that once dotted that hill in east Hollywood and tracked the play of the sun and the moon. Eighty years after Wright's masterpiece was completed, the long-planned restoration of the Maya-flavored house and verdant grounds is about to commence with seismic repairs and replanting of hundreds of olive trees in keeping with Wright's original vision.
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