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Art Collections And Collectors

ENTERTAINMENT
February 22, 1990 | ALLAN PARACHINI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Occidental Petroleum Corp. was accused Wednesday of engaging in a "fraudulent scheme" to "falsify" financial records to artificially lower costs to construct the Armand Hammer Museum of Art and Cultural Center in Westwood. The accusation, filed on behalf of dissident Occidental shareholder Alan R. Kahn, was contained in court papers made public in Wilmington, Del.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 5, 1990 | ALLAN PARACHINI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lawyers siding with Occidental Petroleum Corp. and shareholders opposed to a museum for the art collection of company chairman Armand Hammer squared off Wednesday with Occidental arguing the $400 million collection might go to Japanese investors if the project is halted.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 25, 1989 | ALAN CITRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A prominent Beverly Hills art dealer was charged with five counts of grand theft Tuesday in connection with a widening police investigation into art fraud in Los Angeles and Orange counties. Lee Sonnier, former manager of the Upstairs Gallery on Rodeo Drive, was charged with failing to deliver four pieces of art that were sold for about $872,000. Three were works attributed to the Impressionist master Pierre Auguste Renoir and one was a drawing.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 10, 1988 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, Times Staff Writer
An Italian magistrate investigating the theft of archeological artifacts said Tuesday that he believes at least two archaic Greek sculptures stolen from a site in central Sicily have wound up in the J. Paul Getty Museum in Malibu. Judge Silvio Raffiotta, himself an archeology buff, described the two works as marble statues from the 6th Century BC. He said they were dug up in 1979 by treasure hunters at nearby Morgantina, an important Greek city until its sack by Roman legions in 211 BC.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 16, 1991 | ALLAN PARACHINI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Monterey Peninsula Museum of Art, bidding to become one of the state's premier holders of California historical artworks, will announce today a major expansion including new gallery space to accommodate a collection owned by the late industrialist Justin Dart. Announcement of the plan to construct a 10,000-square-foot gallery on the grounds of the former T.A. Work estate in Monterey is scheduled for a press conference this afternoon to be attended by Gov. Pete Wilson.
NEWS
May 27, 1990 | KEVIN ALLMAN, Allman is a frequent contributor to View
On a recent night in Beverly Hills, crowds stood patiently behind velvet ropes on the sidewalk, waiting for admittance. Limousines lined the curb. Doormen checked their clipboards. Waiters cruised with silver salvers of shrimp and pate. Security guards with walkie-talkies kept things under control. The opening of a new discotheque? The premiere party for Hollywood's latest blockbuster? Hardly.
BUSINESS
May 23, 1990 | PATRICK LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Armand Hammer, chairman of Occidental Petroleum Corp., on Tuesday defended the company's controversial support of a $95-million museum being built to house his private art collection. In response to questions during Occidental's annual shareholders meeting in Santa Monica, Hammer said he was donating his collection for the people of Los Angeles. "Why am I doing this? One reason: You can't take it with you." The line brought laughter from shareholders.
NEWS
August 12, 1991 | MICHAEL HAEDERLE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Senior bow priest Perry Tsadiasi bends down to embrace the long, brown-bagged bundle lying on the table. Clutching it to his cheek, Tsadiasi whispers a prayer in the gentle, confidential murmur of a parent comforting a lost child. The religious elder takes the bundle in his arms, slowly circles the room while repeating the chant and pauses at the doorway, where an offering of sacred cornmeal has been strewn in his path. The purification rite is complete.
NEWS
April 23, 1992 | DAVID COLKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Marvin Cohodas looked at a photograph of an American Indian basket in 1983 and knew he had seen the artifact before. As an expert in basketry of the Washoe--a small, ill-fated tribe that once lived in the Lake Tahoe area--Cohodas had seen thousands of baskets. The picture had been sent to him by a private collector contemplating a purchase. But this basket should not have been for sale.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 10, 1990 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
E. Roger Mandle was a graduate art student when the memorable letter came more than 25 years ago. The reclusive Barnes Foundation here in suburban Philadelphia had granted his request for a rare look at the magnificent paintings assembled by one of the most enigmatic, obsessive and powerful figures in the history of American art. "It was sort of like getting access to the Kremlin," Mandle recalled. The young student beheld one of the grandest private collections in America, assembled by Dr.
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