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October 22, 1992
Los Angeles Times art critic Christopher Knight is one of three recipients of the Chemical Bank Award for newspaper art criticism. Knight was recognized for his March, 1991, article "Why the Artist Can't Draw and Why We Shouldn't Care," a commentary based on the L.A. County Museum of Art exhibition "Why Artists Draw: Six Centuries of Master Drawings From the Collection." Michael Kimmelman of the New York Times and Nancy Stapen of the Boston Globe are the other winners.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 2014 | By Deborah Vankin
A cigarette dangles from the mouth of art iconoclast Dave Hickey as he cracks open the door of the Presidential Suite at downtown Los Angeles' Ace Hotel. Coffee cups, reading material and cigarette butts litter the room, which is dark except for one low-glowing lamp. The dim light silhouettes Hickey's sturdy, broad-chested frame as he shuffles toward the hotel room's patio. "Come on in," he yells in a deep, Southern-inflected voice. "I'll be outside having a smoke. What is there to talk about anyway?
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NEWS
November 16, 1998 | GERALDINE BAUM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Finally, somebody has come out against money. Oddly, the new U.S. currency has drawn enemies, and they are the elite cultural critics of the world, as viewed from Manhattan. With a haute culture sneer, they have vilified the cleaner, greener bills. "Everybody hates them," Adam Gopnik of New Yorker magazine wrote recently of the new $20 bill. "Everybody who sees the New Money says that is doesn't look like money.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 29, 2013 | By Diana Marcum
SALINAS, Calif. - This is a love story involving three hats, one town and the right shade of yellow paint. For decades a trio of giant hat sculptures in a scraggly grass field here had been treated like derelict pieces of playground equipment. Teenagers climbed to the top of what they knew as the "Salinas Hats. " The metal grew rusty and was scarred with gang graffiti. Few seemed to remember that this was "Hat in Three Stages of Landing" by well-known artist Claes Oldenburg and his wife, Coosje van Bruggen.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 1991 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, TIMES ART WRITER
About 200 art critics from around the world will congregate this week in Los Angeles for the 1991 congress of the International Assn. of Art Critics. The meeting, scheduled for Thursday through Tuesday, is the first time the 43-year-old organization has convened in the United States. Generally known by its French acronym AICA (Assn.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 14, 1991 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, TIMES ART WRITER
"Perhaps we spoke too soon," New York critic Kim Levin cautioned her 200 colleagues as she opened the 25th Congress of the International Assn. of Art Critics, which was held during the weekend in Santa Monica. The meeting's theme, "Beyond Walls and Wars: Art and Politics in a Multicultural World," was chosen in "that brief ecstatic interim between the toppling of the Berlin Wall and the burning of the Kuwaiti oil fields.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 1991 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, TIMES ART WRITER
Among the thousands of people who have trekked through the Tejon Pass to see Christo's "Umbrellas" few have been more intensely interested than art critics Luchezar Boyadjiev and Philip Zidarov of Bulgaria, the country that Christo Javacheff left 33 years ago. " 'Umbrellas' is a gift that disappears in a few weeks but grows symbolically and spiritually to an incredible dimension.
NEWS
May 1, 2001 | MAURA DOLAN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
The California Supreme Court ruled Monday that an artist is required to pay licensing fees to depict a celebrity unless the art contains "significant creative elements." The ruling, in a lawsuit filed by the heirs of the Three Stooges, sets up a novel legal test for determining when artwork is commercial exploitation and when it is protected by the 1st Amendment. Experts said the case is likely to influence courts across the nation and may force judges to become art critics.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 24, 2012 | By David Ng
It feels like the kind of Christmas miracle depicted in a Thomas Kinkade painting. The tangled legal battle over Kinkade's estate, which pitted the late artist's girlfriend against his estranged wife, has been settled out of court. The San Jose Mercury News reported that the parties have reached a "secret settlement. "  Lawyers for Nanette Kinkade and Amy Pinto released a statement: "Putting Mr. Kinkade's message of love, spirituality, and optimism at the forefront, the parties are pleased that they have honored Mr. Kinkade by resolving their differences amicably.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 1, 1992
Times art critic Christopher Knight's review "Conceptual Art Thrives in 'Presence' " (Jan. 7) had an accompanying photo describing an artist's "deceptively simple piece of wallboard." Is it just us, or are the modern art critics becoming more and more simple-minded? Is there a lack of oxygen in the high-society circles that these art critics travel in, or is it just plain brain-damage from looking at too many images? Our modern-day art critics have become the ultimate "enablers" in foisting art hoaxes onto the public.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 29, 2013 | By David Ng
It's not often that a high-profile critic publicly issues a mea culpa and reverses an opinion. But that's what happened last week when Peter Schjeldahl, the longtime art critic of the New Yorker magazine, backtracked on his stance on the Detroit Institute of Arts. Schjeldahl incited the ire of much of the art world when he wrote a blog post supporting the selling of art work from the museum to help solve the city of Detroit's serious financial woes. "I demur from the hysterical piety, among many of my fellow art folk, that regularly greets news of museum deaccessions," Schjeldahl wrote Wednesday.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 24, 2013 | By Mike Boehm
As a leader in the search for a successor to Jeffrey Deitch as director at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Joel Wachs is no newcomer to MOCA. As L.A. City Council president in the early 1980s, he negotiated the long-term lease under which MOCA pays $1 a year to occupy the cavernous city-owned former warehouse and police car repair building in downtown's Little Tokyo that is now known as the Geffen Contemporary. After a remodeling by architect Frank Gehry, it opened in 1983 as MOCA's first exhibition space.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 23, 2013 | By Mike Boehm, Los Angeles Times
For William Wilson, the former Los Angeles Times art critic who died Saturday at the age of 78, art was a childhood refuge, a teenage survival mechanism, and, finally, a career that saw him chronicle the city's rise in art-world stature from his first byline in 1965 to his retirement in 1998. "He grew up under really rotten circumstances, and was just a self-made person," said Diane Leslie, a novelist who was a close friend. Another longtime friend, artist Don Lagerberg, said Wilson died in his sleep at a Los Angeles care facility from Alzheimer's disease, which had been diagnosed about four years ago. Wilson, born July 5, 1934,  never knew his father and often talked of hard times growing up in Los Angeles with a single mother who was given to radical mood swings and who fell to her death in an apparent suicide when he was 18. Among his boyhood memories, Leslie said, was eating a great deal of canned tuna - and noticing that sometimes the can had a picture of cats on it. He often spoke of how his mother took him to the library, where he would pore over picture books.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 21, 2013 | By Amy Kaufman
William Wilson, who wrote art criticism for the Los Angeles Times for more than three decades, died Saturday after suffering  from Alzheimer's disease for several years. He was 78. Wilson, who was diagnosed with the disease four years ago, passed away peacefully in a care facility, according to an email distributed to his friends by artist Donald Lagerberg. In his 33 years at The Times, Wilson reviewed numerous art museum exhibitions and wrote at length about famed artists such as Douanier Rousseau and Andy Warhol.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2013 | By David Ng
Will there be portraits of Jar-Jar Binks emerging from a half shell? George Lucas, the producer of the "Star Wars" movies, is planning to build an art museum in San Francisco. The filmmaker told "CBS This Morning" on Tuesday he hopes to create an institution that would be dedicated to exploring "cultural fantasy. " "It's my big project right now," Lucas told CBS. "There's a world of young people who need to be inspired. " PHOTOS: 'Star Wars' at the box office Lucas is a big collector of art, though it's not the kind of art that is likely to impress art critics.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 26, 2013 | By Hector Tobar
Since 2010, the New York- and Venezuela-based Fundación Cisernos has published a series of critically acclaimed books in which several of Latin America's most renowned modern artists speak.   They're gorgeous, thoughtful books, in which creators such as the Argentine-born artist and industrial designer Tomás Maldonado speak at length and freely about the birth of their vision and their careers, often accompanied by illustrations of their work. Now, the Fundación Cisneros/Colección Patricia Phelps de Cisneros is making six of these works available for the first time in e-book format.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 15, 1992 | CATHY CURTIS
Craig Owens' name is among those in 'The Witness Project.' He was a brilliant art critic--and he was a special friend. I think it was the second time I visited the exhibit "Devil on the Stairs: Looking Back on Art of the Eighties"--which closes Sunday at the Newport Harbor Art Museum--that I felt a surge of pain, a sudden reminder of the death of someone I loved, inappropriately but sincerely, many years ago.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 11, 2013 | By Nardine Saad
Kate Middleton's official portrait has been unveiled. Prince William's wife's likeness can now be seen in Britain's National Portrait Gallery - but not everyone is in love with what they see. The painting, by Scottish artist Paul Emsley, who also painted South Africa's Nelson Mandela in his photographic style, was commissioned by the National Portrait Gallery in London, where William and Kate saw the portrait for the first time on Friday before...
ENTERTAINMENT
December 24, 2012 | By David Ng
It feels like the kind of Christmas miracle depicted in a Thomas Kinkade painting. The tangled legal battle over Kinkade's estate, which pitted the late artist's girlfriend against his estranged wife, has been settled out of court. The San Jose Mercury News reported that the parties have reached a "secret settlement. "  Lawyers for Nanette Kinkade and Amy Pinto released a statement: "Putting Mr. Kinkade's message of love, spirituality, and optimism at the forefront, the parties are pleased that they have honored Mr. Kinkade by resolving their differences amicably.
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