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ENTERTAINMENT
September 30, 2006 | Scott Timberg, Times Staff Writer
Russell Ferguson, deputy director of exhibitions and programs and chief curator at the UCLA Hammer Museum, has agreed to become chairman of the university's art department. The appointment, which requires approval by the university and chancellor, is likely to be confirmed near the beginning of 2007, allowing Ferguson to assume the new role in the spring term. He will retain the title adjunct curator at the Hammer.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 1, 2013
Karin Higa Expert in Asian American art Karin Higa, 47, a specialist in Asian American art who worked for nearly a decade and a half as a curator at the Japanese American National Museum in Los Angeles, died Tuesday at her home in L.A., said Russell Ferguson, her husband. Ferguson, a professor in the art department at UCLA, said his wife had been diagnosed with cancer in February. Higa worked as a curator at the Japanese American National Museum from 1992 to 2006, rising to the rank of senior curator of art. She had recently been named a curator for the Hammer Museum's "Made in L.A. " Biennial for 2014 but was forced to step down because of her illness.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 10, 1991 | CATHY CURTIS
"Schools are places where you can have arguments," says Catherine Lord, the dryly iconoclastic new chairman of the art department at UC Irvine. "You learn by seeing other people argue. For me, it's a business of getting people to articulate their ideas--not just verbalize them, but articulate them in their work and have a stake in them. Students need to figure out how much they care and what the price of caring is." Lord, 42, is a social activist in the visual arts.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 30, 2013 | By David Ng
Karin Higa, a specialist in Asian American art who worked for nearly a decade and a half as a curator at the Japanese American National Museum in Los Angeles, has died at 47. Higa died on Tuesday at her home in L.A. following a battle with cancer, said Russell Ferguson, her husband. Ferguson, who is a professor in the art department at UCLA, said that his wife had been diagnosed with cancer in February. Higa worked as a curator at the Japanese American National Museum from 1992 to 2006, rising to the rank of senior curator of art. She had recently been named a curator for the Hammer Museum's "Made in L.A. " Biennial for 2014 but was forced to step down due to her illness.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 3, 1992 | MICHELE FUETSCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It is the power, the awesome technical skill, for which the drawings of Palos Verdes Estates artist Mildred K. Walker are known. If her nude studies suddenly sprang to life, they would surely stride, not walk, off the wall and out the door. "She's not a meek artist," said Walker's friend and former student Maurizio Barattucci. Walker herself speaks boldly about her art. "I don't have a hang(up) with whether people like what I do or not," she said.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 30, 2013 | By David Ng
Karin Higa, a specialist in Asian American art who worked for nearly a decade and a half as a curator at the Japanese American National Museum in Los Angeles, has died at 47. Higa died on Tuesday at her home in L.A. following a battle with cancer, said Russell Ferguson, her husband. Ferguson, who is a professor in the art department at UCLA, said that his wife had been diagnosed with cancer in February. Higa worked as a curator at the Japanese American National Museum from 1992 to 2006, rising to the rank of senior curator of art. She had recently been named a curator for the Hammer Museum's "Made in L.A. " Biennial for 2014 but was forced to step down due to her illness.
NEWS
October 20, 1988
Cal Poly Pomona has opened a new art gallery with an exhibit of 38 works from the collections of several members of the film industry. The John L. and Helen Kellogg Foundation and Mr. and Mrs. W. Keith Kellogg gave most of the money for the building, which is part of the university's art department. The Kelloggs are descendants of cereal magnate W. K. Kellogg, who donated his land to the state for the college. "Hollywood Collects" will be exhibited until Nov.
NEWS
September 20, 1986 | JERRY BELCHER, Times Staff Writer
Artist Corita Kent, the former Los Angeles nun whose colorful works include the immensely popular "LOVE" postage stamp, died in her Boston home Thursday after a six-month battle against cancer. She was 67. As with the stamp design, her art often carried--symbolically as well as literally--messages of hope, optimism and peace.
NEWS
February 26, 1987
Lester E. Longman, professor emeritus of art and past chairman of UCLA's art department, died Jan. 27, at the age of 81. Longman came to UCLA in July, 1958, served as chairman of the art department and professor of art until 1962. He continued teaching art until his retirement in 1973. He also served as head of the art department at the University of Iowa for 22 years. A resident of Pacific Palisades, Longman is survived by his wife, Helen, and three sons, Kenneth, Stanley, and Richard.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 11, 1997 | ZAN DUBIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In 1971, shortly after graduating from UC Irvine, Chris Burden had himself shot in the arm for a piece of performance art that drew international attention to Orange County. The shot heard around the world grooved UCI a niche in art history lore, and Burden, one of today's art novas, never lost his shine.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 11, 2011 | By Reed Johnson, Los Angeles Times
While coming of age as a Mexico City teenager, Ilona Katzew used to skip school to hang out in the capital's ornate Baroque churches and treasure-stuffed museums. The experience was an education in itself, a sensory immersion in the soul of a city that was a teeming metropolis decades before Columbus set foot in the New World. "Growing up in Mexico City I was always aware of the culture around me," Katzew said during a recent interview at LACMA, where she serves as department head of Latin American art. "It was just something that I had in me, for better or for worse.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 11, 2010 | By Cristy Lytal, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Although Christopher Nolan's big-budget psychological action movie "Inception" was shot in six countries, art department researcher Dominique Arcadio found much of what she needed to do her job within the aisles of the Los Angeles Public Library. "For every film I've worked on, I've gotten at least 50 books out of the L.A. Public Library," she said. "They're very good about just letting you take out books that should really be reference books. It's one of the best libraries that I've had a chance of using.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 25, 2008 | Leah Ollman, Ollman is a freelance writer.
Millard Sheets was an artist, so it's somewhat ironic to wish that an exhibition dedicated to the man focused a little less on his art. There are a handful of gems among the 40-plus watercolors, oils, drawings and prints on view at the Oceanside Museum of Art, but Sheets' most enduring legacy is not confined to the page or canvas. He was a doer -- an energetic, productive teacher, mentor, catalyst and facilitator who played a formative role in numerous Southern California cultural institutions.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 6, 2007 | Chris Pasles, Times Staff Writer
A controversial auction of art owned by Golden State Mutual Life Insurance Co. in South Los Angeles set record prices at Swann Auction Galleries in New York, according to Nigel Freeman, head of Swann's African American art department. The auction Thursday had infuriated local art historians who wanted the collection to remain in Southern California.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 30, 2006 | Scott Timberg, Times Staff Writer
Russell Ferguson, deputy director of exhibitions and programs and chief curator at the UCLA Hammer Museum, has agreed to become chairman of the university's art department. The appointment, which requires approval by the university and chancellor, is likely to be confirmed near the beginning of 2007, allowing Ferguson to assume the new role in the spring term. He will retain the title adjunct curator at the Hammer.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 10, 2006 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
CLINT EASTWOOD has a stock company of people he has collaborated with over the years, including editor Joel Cox, cinematographer Tom Stern and twotime Oscar-winning production designer Henry Bumstead ("To Kill a Mockingbird," "The Sting"). Despite battling prostate cancer for the last few years, Bumstead was able to work on Eastwood's latest film, "Flags of Our Fathers," which opens Oct. 20. He even got to see the film before his death at 91 in May.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 12, 2005
UCLA's first Luck of the Draw(ing) event raises funds for the university's art department as several hundred works donated by established and emerging artists are raffled off.
NEWS
May 21, 1992
The Otis/Parsons School of Art and Design recently honored Duane R. Hagan, Karen Mealiffe and Dorothy W. Lee with an Award of Excellence for achievement in arts education. Hagan teaches studio art at Glendale High School and serves as the art department chairman. An art/ceramic specialist, Mealiffe teaches at La Canada High School. Lee teaches art and is the art department chairwoman at Marshall High School in Los Feliz.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 19, 2006 | Mary Rourke, Times Staff Writer
Earle Voorhies, a classical pianist and former chairman of the piano department at the California Institute of the Arts who also taught piano at Cal State universities in Los Angeles, Long Beach and Fullerton, died Aug. 11. He was 93. Voorhies died of cardiac and respiratory arrest at Kindred Hospital in West Covina, according to his daughter, Lee Fernandez. He had been in failing health for several years but continued to teach music at his home.
NEWS
April 20, 2006 | Alex Chun, Special to The Times
IN the film "Memoirs of a Geisha," a jealous Hatsumomo (Gong Li) rips down a trio of posters depicting her upstart rival Sayuri (Ziyi Zhang). Those posters, which advertise Sayuri as the lead performer in a Kabuki-style show, are a prime example of ukiyo-e ("pictures of the floating world") -- art that originated in the city of Edo (1616-1868, now Tokyo) that portrays idealized renditions of courtesans and geisha.
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