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Art Exhibits

NEWS
May 27, 1990 | From United Press International
A controversial exhibit of photographs by Robert Mapplethorpe closed its seven-week display in Cincinnati on Saturday, but a legal tangle remains to be settled. Several of the photos by the late Mapplethorpe depict erotic homosexual situations. On the day the exhibit opened, a Hamilton County grand jury indicted the Contemporary Arts Center and its director, Dennis Barrie, on charges of pandering obscenity and depicting children in the nude.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 1990 | RICK VANDERKNYFF, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A well-known photograph depicting a nude John Lennon embracing a fully clothed Yoko Ono has been removed from an art exhibit at the city-run Muckenthaler Cultural Center in Fullerton. The portrait, by Annie Leibovitz, was pulled from the exhibit "Heroes, Heroines, Idols and Icons," which opened Saturday, after objections from several members of the center's board of trustees.
WORLD
March 29, 2005 | Kim Murphy, Times Staff Writer
The director of the Sakharov Museum was convicted Monday of inciting religious hatred with a controversial art exhibition that was deemed "blasphemous and profane" by the Russian Orthodox Church. A federal district court fined museum director Yuri Samodurov and curator Lyudmila Vasilovskaya $3,600 each for organizing the 2003 exhibit, which featured dozens of artists' expressions on the subject of religion. The show, "Caution: Religion," was closed down quickly after being attacked by vandals.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 3, 1992 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, TIMES ART WRITER
Among the long-lamented gaps in Los Angeles' never-quite-complete art scene is an annual or biennial exhibition to showcase local talent. To provide a nourishing environment for visual artists and encourage a valuable cultural asset, the city must stage a really big show of L.A. art as a regular, ongoing event, the argument goes. "LAX: The Los Angeles Exhibition," opening this week with receptions in seven museums and galleries, was born of this contention.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 14, 2000 | DUKE HELFAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To Andre Kinney, the Holocaust is a hazy term in a history book, like the Civil War or the Ice Age. The 11-year-old isn't sure when it happened, or how many people died. "About 3 million?" he asked. On Monday, Andre and his classmates from Sutter Middle School in Canoga Park came face to face with that epoch in a way that no history book could convey. They viewed images. Not the grainy, black-and-white photos of death camps the world has come to know. But art from those who survived.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 5, 2002 | JOHN M. GLIONNA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A national Roman Catholic group is protesting an exhibit at Copia, the Napa Valley's heralded new food, wine and arts museum, that includes figurines of the pope and several nuns defecating. Activists say the work by Spanish artist Antoni Miralda has no place in a museum funded in part by tax dollars, including money from Catholics. The exhibit, titled "Active Ingredients," also displays miniature figures of Santa Claus and Fidel Castro in similar poses.
WORLD
September 30, 2004 | Kim Murphy, Times Staff Writer
When the well-known Sakharov Museum broached the subject of religion in an art exhibit, no one was surprised that an outcry followed. After all, one work featured an icon into which viewers could insert their heads. Another superimposed Christ on a Coca-Cola logo with the words, "This is My Blood." Followers of a local priest vandalized the exhibit with spray paint. The Russian parliament voted to condemn the display and urged the authorities to "take necessary measures." President Vladimir V.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 3, 1990 | JOSH MEYER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Aside from their status as Protestant clerics, the Rev. Louis P. Sheldon and the Rev. James Conn have little in common, but on one thing they agree: Santa Monica may soon become the latest battleground in a struggle for the soul of America. At issue is an exhibit of the works of artist David Wojnarowicz, and in a broader context, whether the federal government's National Endowment for the Arts should be allowed to fund such controversial projects.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 1990 | BETH KLEID
The Berlin Wall stands again, across from Ed's Shoe Repair and next to a drapery store on a sleepy street in downtown Pomona. But this wall doesn't impose a boundary. It serves as an invitation: "Welcome Berlin Artists," reads a slogan etched on the brightly painted wall covered with graffiti. The mock wall is the introduction to the exhibit "Berlin at the New Frontier," which opened earlier this month at Pomona's DA Gallery.
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