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June 27, 1992 | WILLIAM WILSON, TIMES ART CRITIC
The first significant museum exhibition of L.A. Chicano art was "Los Four," held at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art in 1974. It was a breakthrough for the barrio sensibility. A quartet of young artists festooned the museum's pristine galleries with scruffy spray-can murals, a big assemblage altar, the front end of a flawlessly finished, gorgeously garish lowrider. The artists were Frank Romero, Beto de la Rocha, Gilbert Lujan and Carlos Almaraz.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 25, 1995 | WILLIAM WILSON, TIMES ART CRITIC
Mexico's indigenous art was ferociously intense--from its pre-Columbian temples to its heroic revolutionary muralists and satirical popular artists. Mexican American artists inherited this heartfelt engagement with the realities of the spirit but gave it their own twist. The resulting aesthetic is seen in the Laguna Art Museum exhibition "Across the Street: Self-Help Graphics and Chicano Art in Los Angeles."
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 25, 1995 | WILLIAM WILSON, TIMES ART CRITIC
Mexico's indigenous art was ferociously intense--from its pre-Columbian temples to its heroic revolutionary muralists and satirical popular artists. Mexican American artists inherited this heartfelt engagement with the realities of the spirit but gave it their own twist. The resulting aesthetic is seen in the Laguna Art Museum exhibition "Across the Street: Self-Help Graphics and Chicano Art in Los Angeles."
ENTERTAINMENT
March 25, 1995 | ZAN DUBIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Laguna Art Museum curator Bolton Colburn sensed something uniquely vital the moment he entered Self-Help Graphics. The community-based art center in East Los Angeles, born of the tumultuous Chicano rights movement of the 1960s, was founded to nurture the careers of young Latino artists via workshops, exhibitions and free access to professional silk-screen printing facilities.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 25, 1995 | ZAN DUBIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Laguna Art Museum curator Bolton Colburn sensed something uniquely vital the moment he entered Self-Help Graphics. The community-based art center in East Los Angeles, born of the tumultuous Chicano rights movement of the 1960s, was founded to nurture the careers of young Latino artists via workshops, exhibitions and free access to professional silk-screen printing facilities.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 7, 1992 | SHAUNA SNOW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A curandera (faith healer) uses a broom to sweep evil spirits away from a woman who is lying on a kitchen floor, surrounded by kneeling family members and a pot of incense. Two teen-age girls scuffle outside a nightclub, kicking up dust and pulling out clumps of each others' hair. And 13 family members gather in a well-lit kitchen, each part of a well-organized assembly line in the endless preparation of traditional Christmas tamales.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 12, 1987 | LEAH OLLMAN
"New Traditions: Thirteen Hispanic Photographers" is a show whose premise is at least as provocative as its contents. When Robert J. Phelan, curator of the exhibition for the New York State Museum, was searching out work to include, he expected "for longer than I now care to admit" that a unifying theme would emerge among Hispanic photographers. Instead, he writes in the exhibition catalogue, the theme that emerged was no theme at all. The show, he acknowledges, is about contradictions.
NEWS
August 5, 2001
* The Museum of Latin American Art and Hispanics for Los Angeles Opera will present baritone Pablo Porras in concert at 5 p.m. today at the museum, 628 Alamitos Ave., Long Beach. Tickets, $45. Call (562) 435-1689. * Our House, nonprofit grief-counseling centers in West Los Angeles and Woodland Hills, are sponsoring its first benefit fashion show featuring fall menswear modeled by daytime television stars on Monday at Napa Valley Grille in Westwood. Tickets, $125. Call (818) 763-6330.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 7, 1992 | SHAUNA SNOW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A curandera (faith healer) uses a broom to sweep evil spirits away from a woman who is lying on a kitchen floor, surrounded by kneeling family members and a pot of incense. Two teen-age girls scuffle outside a nightclub, kicking up dust and pulling out clumps of each others' hair. And 13 family members gather in a well-lit kitchen, each part of a well-organized assembly line in the endless preparation of traditional Christmas tamales.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 27, 1992 | WILLIAM WILSON, TIMES ART CRITIC
The first significant museum exhibition of L.A. Chicano art was "Los Four," held at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art in 1974. It was a breakthrough for the barrio sensibility. A quartet of young artists festooned the museum's pristine galleries with scruffy spray-can murals, a big assemblage altar, the front end of a flawlessly finished, gorgeously garish lowrider. The artists were Frank Romero, Beto de la Rocha, Gilbert Lujan and Carlos Almaraz.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 12, 1987 | LEAH OLLMAN
"New Traditions: Thirteen Hispanic Photographers" is a show whose premise is at least as provocative as its contents. When Robert J. Phelan, curator of the exhibition for the New York State Museum, was searching out work to include, he expected "for longer than I now care to admit" that a unifying theme would emerge among Hispanic photographers. Instead, he writes in the exhibition catalogue, the theme that emerged was no theme at all. The show, he acknowledges, is about contradictions.
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