Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsArt History
IN THE NEWS

Art History

ENTERTAINMENT
June 7, 2012 | By Jasmine Elist, Los Angeles Times
When it comes to home decorating on a budget, art options get generic pretty fast. Between mass-produced images of Marilyn Monroe or New York City's taxicabs sold at big box retail stores, the works covering the walls of people's homes aren't chosen because they're particularly fresh or unique but because they are affordable and accessible. In the hopes of providing a more interesting alternative, recent University of Michigan graduates and 24-year-old L.A. natives Chelsea Neman and Jordan Klein co-founded the Tappan Collective, an online gallery selling original work by emerging artists.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
July 17, 2011 | By Suzanne Muchnic, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Rebels in Paradise The Los Angeles Art Scene and the 1960s Hunter Drohojowska-Philp Henry Holt: 288 pp., $27 After decades of neglect, Los Angeles art history is a hot topic. The most immediate reason is "Pacific Standard Time: L.A. Art 1945-1980," an enormous collaborative venture spearheaded by the Getty Foundation and Getty Research Institute. Dozens of exhibitions and related publications exploring the city's rise as an art capital will appear this fall and winter in cultural institutions from San Diego to Santa Barbara.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 15, 2007
AND Stanley Meisler's point in his review of Sargent's works ["Portrait of an Artist on Vacation," July 8] is? The exhibition is not in Los Angeles, not even in California. If I wanted an art history lesson, I would go to the library or the museum. STEPHANY YABLOW North Hollywood
NEWS
August 25, 1994 | TALLY GOLDSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Before taking a class during her senior year at Rosemead High School, Lisa Chan thought art history was nothing more than learning the difference between a Monet and Manet, a Picasso and Pissarro. But while earning an art history degree at UCLA last spring and interning at museums in Los Angeles and Washington, D.C., Chan, 22, has discovered there's almost no end to where art history can lead. This summer, Chan was one of 12 undergraduates chosen for an internship with the J.
OPINION
March 18, 2012 | By Alec Nevala-Lee
One hundred years ago today, on March 18, 1912, two men dressed in black crossed the Seine in Paris to pay a call on their younger brother, an artist who lived alone in his studio on Rue Amiral-de-Joinville. Half a century later, the artist would vividly remember the dark clothes his brothers had worn that day, as if they had come to challenge him to a duel. The visit, it seems, was brief. Once his brothers had departed, the artist locked up the house and took a taxi by himself to the Quai d'Orsay, where the Salon des Independants was scheduled to begin later that week.
NEWS
August 14, 1996 | Associated Press
A retired art history professor pleaded guilty Tuesday to possessing 14th century religious and historical documents stolen from libraries at the Vatican and in Spain. Anthony Melnikas did not admit taking the illustrated manuscript pages. But the 69-year-old former Ohio State professor gave no explanation of how he obtained them. He could get up to 64 years in prison and $2 million in fines. No sentencing date was set.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|