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ENTERTAINMENT
July 15, 2007
AND Stanley Meisler's point in his review of Sargent's works ["Portrait of an Artist on Vacation," July 8] is? The exhibition is not in Los Angeles, not even in California. If I wanted an art history lesson, I would go to the library or the museum. STEPHANY YABLOW North Hollywood
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NEWS
August 25, 1994 | TALLY GOLDSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Before taking a class during her senior year at Rosemead High School, Lisa Chan thought art history was nothing more than learning the difference between a Monet and Manet, a Picasso and Pissarro. But while earning an art history degree at UCLA last spring and interning at museums in Los Angeles and Washington, D.C., Chan, 22, has discovered there's almost no end to where art history can lead. This summer, Chan was one of 12 undergraduates chosen for an internship with the J.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 11, 2010 | By Scarlet Cheng, Special to the Los Angeles Times
When Anne van Grevenstein-Kruse was a child, her family made a pilgrimage from Antwerp to Ghent to see "The Adoration of the Mystic Lamb," the celebrated 15th century altarpiece by Hubert and Jan van Eyck. "It was still in its original chapel," she recalls, "and I remember very well the old man who was paid to close the altarpiece and open it again." Made up of 18 painted panels, the work, also known as the Ghent Altarpiece, is widely considered a treasure of early Northern Renaissance art and an object of veneration in Art History 101. It also boasts a legacy so checkered that it could be lifted from a Dan Brown novel.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 1, 2013 | Devin Kelly
Michael McManus, the former chief curator for the Laguna Art Museum and organizer of a major scholarly overview of California Impressionism, has died. He was 60. McManus, who had a heart condition, died Aug. 10 at his home in Seal Beach, said Mike Stice, a spokesman for Laguna College of Art and Design. Known for his quirky mannerisms and encyclopedic knowledge of the history of art and regionalist movements, McManus was a popular faculty member at Laguna College of Art and Design (formerly the Art Institute of Southern California)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 28, 2002 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
She viewed women's makeup as a mask of conformity, unisex trends as rendering men and women like puppies in a litter and the modern rage for skinniness as indicative of world woes. And she kept few of those views private. She endeared herself to students, colleagues, friends and the curious public by lecturing regularly on such subjects inside and outside the classroom. Mary A.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 5, 2013 | By Deborah Vankin
The saga of 1,500 art works recovered in Munich, with an estimated value of more than $1 billion and possibly stolen by Nazis in the 1930s and 1940s, made big headlines over the weekend. The German publication Focus reported that the 2011 discovey - which included masterpieces by Matisse, Picasso, Klee and Chagal - in the cluttered home of Cornelius Gurlitt, could be the largest stash of Nazi-looted art uncovered since World War II. But the recovered trove is likely just a drop in the bucket of what some call the greatest theft in history.  CRITICS' PICKS: What to watch, where to go, what to eat “I've been saying for 10 years this is the tip of the iceberg.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 25, 2011 | By Peter Plagens, Special to the Los Angeles Times
So there's my name, on Page 1 of "Pacific Standard Time: Los Angeles Art, 1945-1980," the Getty's massive overview catalog for its monumental effort to get Southern California modern art into the heretofore New York-centric history of American modernism. The mention isn't so much about me as about my 1974 book, "Sunshine Muse: Contemporary Art on the West Coast" (which was reissued by the University of California Press as "Sunshine Muse: Art on the West Coast, 1945-1970" in 2000)
NEWS
August 14, 1996 | Associated Press
A retired art history professor pleaded guilty Tuesday to possessing 14th century religious and historical documents stolen from libraries at the Vatican and in Spain. Anthony Melnikas did not admit taking the illustrated manuscript pages. But the 69-year-old former Ohio State professor gave no explanation of how he obtained them. He could get up to 64 years in prison and $2 million in fines. No sentencing date was set.
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