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ENTERTAINMENT
July 15, 2007
AND Stanley Meisler's point in his review of Sargent's works ["Portrait of an Artist on Vacation," July 8] is? The exhibition is not in Los Angeles, not even in California. If I wanted an art history lesson, I would go to the library or the museum. STEPHANY YABLOW North Hollywood
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NEWS
August 25, 1994 | TALLY GOLDSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Before taking a class during her senior year at Rosemead High School, Lisa Chan thought art history was nothing more than learning the difference between a Monet and Manet, a Picasso and Pissarro. But while earning an art history degree at UCLA last spring and interning at museums in Los Angeles and Washington, D.C., Chan, 22, has discovered there's almost no end to where art history can lead. This summer, Chan was one of 12 undergraduates chosen for an internship with the J.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 5, 2013 | By Deborah Vankin
The saga of 1,500 art works recovered in Munich, with an estimated value of more than $1 billion and possibly stolen by Nazis in the 1930s and 1940s, made big headlines over the weekend. The German publication Focus reported that the 2011 discovey - which included masterpieces by Matisse, Picasso, Klee and Chagal - in the cluttered home of Cornelius Gurlitt, could be the largest stash of Nazi-looted art uncovered since World War II. But the recovered trove is likely just a drop in the bucket of what some call the greatest theft in history.  CRITICS' PICKS: What to watch, where to go, what to eat “I've been saying for 10 years this is the tip of the iceberg.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 4, 1996 | Susan Kandel, Susan Kandel is a regular art reviewer for Calendar
Thanks to a long history of cultural voyeurism extending from Alexis de Tocqueville to Jean Baudrillard, the French have enshrined a particular mythology of our country: Americans are barbarians, yes, but with an uncanny knack for getting things done. We, too, have our own beloved myths about France--Paris in particular.
NEWS
August 14, 1996 | Associated Press
A retired art history professor pleaded guilty Tuesday to possessing 14th century religious and historical documents stolen from libraries at the Vatican and in Spain. Anthony Melnikas did not admit taking the illustrated manuscript pages. But the 69-year-old former Ohio State professor gave no explanation of how he obtained them. He could get up to 64 years in prison and $2 million in fines. No sentencing date was set.
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