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November 27, 2007 | From the Associated Press
A set of 14 gunpowder paintings by Chinese artist Cai Guo-Qiang sold for $9.5 million at an auction in Hong Kong, breaking records for the artist and for Chinese contemporary art, Christie's auction house said Monday. The abstract works by Cai were sold to an anonymous bidder Sunday as part of a mammoth auction of contemporary South and Southeast Asian art in Hong Kong. Cai's 14 screens, done in gunpowder and ink, sold for double their estimated value of $3.5 million to $4.
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April 30, 2003 | Mike Boehm, Times Staff Writer
As the World Health Organization lifted its warning against traveling to SARS-struck Toronto on Tuesday, cultural officials in the Canadian city hoped that an epidemic of postponed performances by U.S. artists would reverse itself, and that a dip in attendance at museums, plays and concerts during the outbreak would end.
NEWS
November 2, 1996 | MAGGIE FARLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When artist Pun Sing Lui poured red paint over a statue of Queen Victoria and bashed in her nose with a hammer, some Hong Kong artists turned up theirs. "It's not art, it's vandalism," sniffed one art critic of the move. "It's like an act from the Cultural Revolution," said Johnson Chang, a gallery curator who has fostered avant-garde art in Hong Kong, referring to the period of upheaval in China from 1966-1976 when Red Guards destroyed artworks they called "feudal relics."
ENTERTAINMENT
November 5, 1999 | ERIC HARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Waking up in bed, fully clothed, after a night of drinking and dancing and who knows what else, Rick, a disheveled young lawyer in the new movie "Body Shots," raises a puzzled brow when the young lawyer next to him opens her eyes and asks, in a hung-over, whispery voice: "What the hell happened?" It's a straightforward question. But anyone who expects a straightforward answer hasn't been paying attention at the movies of late, because straightforward has gone out of style.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 1998 | Scarlet Cheng, Scarlet Cheng is an occasional contributor to Calendar
"China is different from the U.S. in that way," says Chinese artist Xu Bing, who moved to this country in 1990. "Here, contemporary art is mainstream--in China it's not, it's still underground." And thus, the added frisson to a show such as "Inside Out: New Chinese Art," which opened last month at the Asia Society and P. S. 1 Contemporary Art Center in New York. It offers the heady lure of forbidden fruit, as well as the promise of insight into the psyche of that awakening giant: modern China.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 1, 2006 | Suzanne Muchnic, Times Staff Writer
"When I was a student, it was Jasper Johns and Robert Rauschenberg who were clearly the most important artists," said Thomas Lawson, a painter and dean of the School of Art at CalArts. "Them and Andy Warhol. Everybody agreed that they were the ones. Now, because there are such diverse possibilities, it's much harder to say." Of contemporary art today, two things, and maybe only two things, can be said for sure.
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