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ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 1997 | ROBIN RAUZI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's not exactly David trying to slay Goliath. It's more like David trying to steal the shoes Goliath left out by the backdoor. OK, the analogy is a little strained. For years, though, giant chain-owned multiplexes have been stomping one- and two-screen theaters out of existence. Now, the two-screen Regent Westlake is fighting back using unexpected weapons: foreign and independent movies. "We know there is an audience for this type of movie," said Mark R.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 4, 2014 | By Richard Verrier
In the lobby of the historic Royal Theatre in West Los Angeles, Bob Laemmle proudly points to a wall of glass-encased photos and letters from cinema luminaries of the last half-century. "This is one of Ingmar Bergman," he says proudly, gesturing to a photo of the Swedish director, his arm around the shoulder of Bob's father, Max, taken during the 1972 premiere of "Cries and Whispers. " Next to it is a letter from the director and actor Andre Gregory, thanking Max for a party he hosted in support of the 1981 movie "My Dinner With Andre.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 20, 1992 | DAVID J. FOX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
What's this? Another multiplex in Los Angeles? This week's grand opening of the Sunset 5 Theaters at Sunset and Crescent Heights boulevards is yet the latest in a significant number of new movie theater screens that have blossomed throughout the region during the last several years. But unlike the vast number of multiplex complexes that book mostly mainstream Hollywood movies, the Sunset 5 will be devoted to the showing of specialty and foreign language films.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 10, 2013 | By Sheri Linden
How do you represent a hundred years of a nation's moviemaking, especially when the country is one as vast and complex as China? In what it's calling a "preliminary" sampling, the UCLA Film & Television Archive is offering Angelenos the chance to experience a striking array of selections of Chinese cinema, from the silent gems of Shanghai's Golden Age to recently unearthed midcentury satires and more familiar art-house hits such as 2000's "In the...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 6, 1997 | ROBIN RAUZI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's not exactly David trying to slay Goliath. It's more like David trying to steal the shoes Goliath left out by the backdoor. OK, the analogy is a little strained. For years, though, giant chain-owned multiplexes have been stomping one- and two-screen theaters out of existence. Now, the two-screen Regent Westlake is fighting back using unexpected weapons: foreign and independent movies. "We know there is an audience for this type of movie," said Mark R.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 23, 1987 | DENISE HAMILTON, Times Staff Writer
New first-run movie theaters may be popping up all over. But the box-office boom isn't likely to rescue Southern California's rapidly disappearing single-screen art and repertory movie houses. Since the revival peak of the 1970s and early 1980s, many ornate old picture palaces have closed down or switched from repertory to mainstream movies. In Los Angeles alone, their number has shrunk from 13 to seven in less than a decade.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 20, 2007 | John Horn, Times Staff Writer
IT'S the center of the filmmaking universe, a high-income slice of town both swollen with industry executives yet far from overflowing with state-of-the-art theaters. Bringing a new multiplex to West Los Angeles should have taken no longer than it takes to crank out another "Saw" sequel, not more than a decade. But sometimes exhibition moves at the same glacial pace as Westside traffic.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 25, 1994
There is a pattern going on in Hollywood that has as much to say about America as it does about the movie industry. Where are the beautiful and talented actresses who have foreign accents? One way to stardom in movies is to create a sensation--get noticed in a really "showy" role. Persis Khambatta ("Star Trek--The Motion Picture"), Marthe Keller ("Bobby Deerfield"), Sonia Braga ("Kiss of the Spider Woman"), Nastassja Kinski ("Tess") and others have done that. But their careers in the United States did not skyrocket.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 28, 1987
While it is in fact old news that revival theaters have been disappearing, due to a decline in audience interest in certain classic, revival and cult films, it is absolutely wrong to conclude from my comments a general decline in interest in "art" films ("Bringing the Movies Closer to Home--But Art Houses are Doing a Big Fade Out in L.A.," by Denise Hamilton, Nov. 23). Our 29 non-revival screens, including the Samuel Goldwyn Pavilion Cinemas, are successfully playing many first-run "art" films.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 23, 2001
Kenneth Turan's piece on the cold, cynical nature of current art-house films conveniently ignores many recent releases that don't fit into his rigid and simplistic thesis ("New Cinema's Heartless Beat," Dec. 2). In the past few years there have been many sincere and profound explorations of the human condition that have found their way into art houses, from Keith Gordon's "Waking the Dead" and Dan Cohen's "Diamond Men" to Kurt Voss and Allison Anders' "Sugar Town." Granted, none of these terrific movies reached the large audiences that "Kids" or "Chuck & Buck" did, but if Turan is so convinced that young audiences are cynical and jaded, why doesn't he try to turn them on to the movies that might open their minds and hearts a little rather than simply railing against the films they already know about?
ENTERTAINMENT
August 12, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Fans lucky enough to have scored tickets to the Jean Cocteau Cinema in Santa Fe on Friday night  handed them over to none other than author George R.R. Martin, who was manning the door. The author of the books behind the hit HBO series "Game of Thrones" has used his earnings to buy and restore -- complete with legendary popcorn -- the shuttered movie theater. "The Grand Re-Opening of the Jean Cocteau Cinema came off as scheduled on Friday evening ... something I scarcely would have believed a week ago," Martin writes on his website.
NEWS
July 18, 2013 | By John Verive
Angel City Brewery continues to showcase local artists at its Arts District brewery, and this weekend it will be holding an open house for the new "Over a Barrel" exhibit benefitting the Free Arts charity. The open house runs from 4 to 9 p.m. Saturday, and six local Downtown artists, Andre Miripolsky , Scott Forrest , Jaime Colindres , A.S. Ashley, Emmeric Konrad , and J.W. Pippen , will have works displayed at the brewery's on-site gallery. Each artist will also produce an original work using an Angel City oak barrel top as a canvas, and the finished pieces will be auctioned off on Saturday to benefit the Free Arts For Abused Children charity . The charity was founded in 1977, and in 2012 alone nearly 30,000 kids received free art instruction, workshops and supplies from the charity, whose mission is to "inspire hope in the lives of children who have experienced abuse, neglect, poverty and homelessness through innovative creative arts programs and positive interactions with caring adult volunteers.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 23, 2013 | By Chris Lee, Los Angeles Times
Michel Gondry denies feeling stung by "The Green Hornet. " The $120-million action-adventure arrived in 2011 as the Oscar-winning French filmmaker's first Hollywood-backed studio movie. A modest hit starring Seth Rogen and Cameron Diaz, it required him to make no small number of creative compromises on its way to the screen, marking the only time final cut on one of his films was wrested away during an idiosyncratic dozen-year feature career. "Doing a big studio movie, the process could be, at times, challenging," Gondry admits in Inspector Clouseau-like English.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 9, 2012 | By Gabrielle Jaffe
BEIJING - Yang Jin shot his first film, "The Black and White Milk Cow," in his hometown in 2004 for $1,600. He asked villagers to be his actors, paying them only in cigarettes, and his main expense was $320 spent renting the titular cow. The tale of poor, rural China won him a $5,000 prize at Switzerland's Fribourg International Film Festival, but it had no chance of being seen or making money in his homeland. Because it touched on the subjects of AIDS and Chinese Christians, Yang knew it wouldn't get past the censors, and thus could never play in Chinese theaters, on TV, or even be sold legally on DVD. Yang's second film was a similarly shoestring, underground affair.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 5, 2012 | By Mark Olsen
Not every foreign-language film can get one of its stars booked on such high-profile publicity stops as “The Tonight Show with Jay Leno.” So when “Rust And Bone” has the ability to get national television exposure thanks to star Marion Cotillard, that automatically positions the movie as something that could potentially break out beyond an art-house audience. The Oscar triumph of “The Artist” and the recent worldwide box-office success of “The Intouchables” are also recent signs that French pictures in particular can still resonate more broadly.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 24, 2012 | By Richard Verrier, Los Angeles Times
Growing up in Los Angeles in the 1940s and 1950s, Robert Redford fell in love with the movies at small community theaters that screened cartoons, shorts and newsreels, documentaries and feature films. "What you had then was film in all its forms," Redford said this week. "It was lot more like a community experience where you would recognize your neighbors. " Now the actor, director, producer and founder of the annual Sundance Film Festival is hoping to revive that community spirit by opening an indie cinema house in West Hollywood.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 9, 2008 | Tracy Wilkinson, Times Staff Writer
Serbia is a troubled country of rich history that lives by its myths and symbols. And so a new movie, billed as the most expensive locally made film ever, is a daring, bizarre and wholly provocative attempt to turn those images on their heads. The movie (a word about the title in a minute) is the first full-length feature by director Uros Stojanovic, an ambitious 30-something who seems fond of entering a room with a flourish. It is set in a ravaged Serbia just after the First World War and tells the story of a village where there are no men left -- they've all died in battle.
BUSINESS
March 16, 1997
It's no surprise that James Bates ("Cultural Imperialism Against Canada? Oh, Please," Feb. 18) is unable to recognize the cultural imperialism of the U. S., not just in Canada, but around the world. He is, after all, with the empire. In Canada, the bulk of television signals received are from the United States, and on Canadian stations a good portion of programming is American. In U.S. television history, only one Canadian series, "Due South," has ever been put on prime-time network space.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 29, 2012 | By Mark Olsen, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The films "The Innkeepers," written and directed by Ti West, and "Kill List," directed and co-written by Ben Wheatley, are idiosyncratic takes on the notion of the horror film, made by filmmakers who tell their stories with a mix of suspenseful invention and wicked irreverence. Both open in Los Angeles on Friday and are already available via video-on-demand platforms. And both belong to a new wave of movies emerging from the festival circuit that appeal to both the art-house/cinephile set and hard-core horror fans.
WORLD
December 26, 2011 | By Devorah Lauter, Los Angeles Times
The holiday lights on the Champs-Elysees are in full splendor, but right off the avenue, the landmark art house movie palace, the Balzac, has remained dark for days. Jean-Jacques Schpoliansky, owner of the independent film theater, has shut the doors from Dec. 21 to 28 to protest what he says is an existential threat to his long-standing business by major theater chains, which have increasingly snatched the rights to screen the sort of artistic but popular films that have provided him his baguette et beurre until now. A sign of explanation outside his gated cinema includes a quote from philosopher Albert Camus: "Everything which degrades culture shortens the path to servitude.
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