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May 9, 2011 | By Jori Finkel
The J. Paul Getty Trust has just announced that James Cuno will become its president and chief executive starting Aug. 1. A respected museum leader and scholar, Cuno has been the director of the Art Institute of Chicago since 2004, where he oversaw the completion of the museum's $280-million Modern wing, designed by Renzo Piano. Before that, he had served as director of the Courtauld Institute of Art and the director of the Harvard Art Museums. Cuno, an expert in 19th century French printmaking, was also director of the Grunwald Center for the Graphic Arts at UCLA in the mid-1980s.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 15, 2014 | By Mike Boehm
A new documentary film is the latest chapter in an ongoing effort to keep alive the memory of the defunct Chouinard Art Institute as a foundation slab in L.A.'s rise to art world prominence. “Curly,” produced and directed by Gianina Ferreyra, addresses the influential school's history from 1921 to 1972, when it was subsumed into the newly established California Institute of the Arts, and the 21st century effort to rekindle awareness of Chouinard. The 51-minute film's first showing is 6:30 p.m. Thursday in the community room of the South Pasadena Public Library, accompanied by a panel discussion involving a number of L.A. art luminaries connected to Chouinard, including Larry Bell, Chaz Bojorquez, Llyn Foulkes and John Van Hamersveld.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 23, 2004 | From Reuters
The Art Institute of Chicago, renowned for its eclectic collection that features the masters of French Impressionism, on Thursday named James Cuno its new director. Cuno, 52, the current director of Britain's Courtauld Institute of Art and former head of the Harvard University museums in Boston, will assume his new post in September. He replaces James Wood, who announced last year that he would leave the Art Institute after 24 years. Cuno was born in St. Louis.
NEWS
February 9, 2014 | By Deborah Vankin
 Shulamit Gallery in Venice, which focuses on the Middle East and features Iranian and Israeli artists as well as L.A.-based Jewish artists, is debuting multimedia artist Jonas N.T. Becker in an exhibition called “Zol Zayn/What If?” The gallery hosted a private dinner Thursday night in the artist's honor. As guests wandered in from the rain, Becker, looking a bit nervous but dapper in a velvet tuxedo jacket, gave a short talk about her work. Then she led the 20 or so guests -- including Craft & Folk Museum director Suzanne Isken, KCRW "Art Talk" host Edward Goldman, collectors and artists -- on a tour of the modern, four-story home-turned-gallery.
NEWS
June 2, 2005 | From Associated Press
The Art Institute of Chicago has unveiled the final design of a new building that will house contemporary and modern collections and has launched the public aspect of a fundraising campaign that is $115 million short of its goal. Construction will start this week on the 264,000-square-foot expansion, which is scheduled for completion in the spring of 2009. Italian architect Renzo Piano designed the $258-million glass, steel and limestone building. John H.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 1997
The Art Institute of Southern California will present two shows this month: an exhibit by more than 150 students and a display of the works of this year's graduating seniors. The annual Juried Student Exhibition will be on display Thursday through April 24. Part of the event will be a public reception from 6 to 8 p.m. April 17. The Graduating Senior Exhibition, which will run April 28 through May 10, will feature the works of students receiving their degrees on the final day of the exhibit.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 29, 2013 | By Mike Boehm, Los Angeles Times
L.A. added two new million-dollar-a-year executives to the ranks of its top-paid arts leaders during 2011, although two existing members of the seven-person club had to get by with less than they'd made in 2010. Increases for Music Center President Stephen Rountree and Los Angeles Opera music director James Conlon put them above $1 million in total wages and benefits, according to the organizations' recently filed federal tax returns for the 2011-12 fiscal year that ended last June 30, the most recent period for which figures are available.
NEWS
September 3, 1991 | PAMELA MARIN
Smoke--a.k.a. "jasmine-scented fog"--got in their eyes. Clowns, jugglers and magicians got their attention. And when the party was over, the Art Institute of Southern California got $40,000. Designing Women, a support group for the Laguna Beach art school, hosted a circus-themed benefit Sunday that gave guests a chance to dress silly and play kids games while they forked over dollars like grown-ups.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 11, 1996 | ZAN DUBIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
John W. Lottes, president of the Art Institute of Southern California, died Monday of an inoperable brain tumor, according to his family. He was 62. Lottes, who had been president of Orange County's only private four-year art college since 1991, had been on medical leave since Nov. 1, said the institute's chief financial officer, James D. Godek, who has been its acting president.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 14, 1990 | ZAN DUBIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Art Institute of Southern California has rejected a $15,000 grant from the National Endowment for the Arts. Trustees of the small fine arts school voted unanimously late last week to turn down the grant rather than sign an NEA-mandated anti-obscenity certification required of all 1990 grant recipients. "By accepting the grant, the institution would be taking the first step down the very dangerous path of censorship," Russell E. Lewis, president of the school, wrote in a letter to the NEA.
NEWS
November 10, 2013 | By Carren Jao
Only about a year has passed since Ben Medansky started his own studio, but already his cheeky wabi sabi ceramics have landed on the shelves of stores in Los Angeles, San Francisco, Chicago and New York. “Ceramics is something you do every day,” said Medansky, whose pieces start at $50 and run upwards of $300. “Clay is so alive. It's like having a bunch of crying babies to take care of daily.” PHOTO GALLERY: Ben Medansky's ceramics Medansky has a wry style.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 6, 2013 | By David Ng
A Roy Lichtenstein sculpture will be installed on the grounds of the newly opened Wallis Annenberg Center for the Performing Arts in Beverly Hills. The artist's "Coups de Pinceau" (1988) is scheduled to be unveiled Saturday on South Santa Monica Boulevard between North Crescent and North Canon drives. The artwork, which is an artist's proof created posthumously in 2011, is on extended loan from the Roy Lichtenstein Foundation in New York. (An artist's proof is, in this case, a recently created edition of the original conception.)
ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 2013 | By Mark Caro
DETROIT - The Christie's appraisers enter on Mondays, when the museum is closed, and either inspect what's on the walls or ask to see some of the thousands of works not on display, sometimes sending Detroit Institute of Arts technicians on half-day missions to find pieces in deep storage and prepare them for examination. People on the local cultural scene tend to think that it won't happen, that the city ultimately won't sell off some or all of this world-class art museum's collection to help cover the more than $18 billion in debt obligations cited in Detroit's recent bankruptcy filing.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 1, 2013 | Devin Kelly
Michael McManus, the former chief curator for the Laguna Art Museum and organizer of a major scholarly overview of California Impressionism, has died. He was 60. McManus, who had a heart condition, died Aug. 10 at his home in Seal Beach, said Mike Stice, a spokesman for Laguna College of Art and Design. Known for his quirky mannerisms and encyclopedic knowledge of the history of art and regionalist movements, McManus was a popular faculty member at Laguna College of Art and Design (formerly the Art Institute of Southern California)
ENTERTAINMENT
July 24, 2013 | By Mike Boehm
As a leader in the search for a successor to Jeffrey Deitch as director at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Joel Wachs is no newcomer to MOCA. As L.A. City Council president in the early 1980s, he negotiated the long-term lease under which MOCA pays $1 a year to occupy the cavernous city-owned former warehouse and police car repair building in downtown's Little Tokyo that is now known as the Geffen Contemporary. After a remodeling by architect Frank Gehry, it opened in 1983 as MOCA's first exhibition space.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 5, 2013 | By Matt Hamilton, Kate Mather and Emily Foxhall
A sheriff's helicopter surveyed a Simi Valley park Friday morning as authorities walked the grassy lawn littered with items left behind. Lawn chairs. Broken sunglasses. Barbecue grills. Flip flops. As people gathered near Rancho Santa Susana Community Park to retrieve their belongings and revisit the scene, many recalled the explosion at the Fourth of July fireworks display that sent the crowd running and left at least 28 people injured. Simi Valley resident Victor Morales, 40, said his brother Danny Morales, 42, was hit between the eyes.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 8, 2012 | By Christopher Knight, Los Angeles Times Art Critic
CHICAGO - Roy Lichtenstein's 1963 painting "Whaam!" shows an American fighter pilot shooting down an enemy aircraft in a dramatic explosion of comic-book color. Among his most familiar works, it turns up in the third room of a wonderfully revealing retrospective at the Art Institute of Chicago. But the painting looks very different than it has before - deeper, richer, more bracingly complex. That's one sign of a worthwhile show. "Roy Lichtenstein: A Retrospective" is huge - more than 100 paintings, plus sculptures and drawings, spanning half a century.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 21, 1988
Richard Carp, formerly acting vice president for academic affairs at California College of Arts and Crafts in Oakland, has been named dean of academic affairs at the Art Institute of Southern California in Laguna Beach. Carp will be responsible for the art college's educational programs, including the bachelor of fine arts curriculum, continuing-education courses and professional certificate programs. Carp will also oversee faculty recruitment, student services and academic advising.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 11, 2013 | By Jason Felch, Los Angeles Times
Federal agents have seized an estimated $100 million in art over the last two years from a prominent Manhattan antiquities dealer they describe as one of the most prolific antiquities smugglers in the world. Subhash Kapoor, a 64-year-old American citizen, awaits trial in India, where he is accused of being part of an antiquities smuggling ring that American and Indian investigators say spanned continents. U.S. authorities have issued their own arrest warrant for Kapoor, saying they have evidence he supplied stolen art to leading museums around the world.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 29, 2013 | By Mike Boehm, Los Angeles Times
L.A. added two new million-dollar-a-year executives to the ranks of its top-paid arts leaders during 2011, although two existing members of the seven-person club had to get by with less than they'd made in 2010. Increases for Music Center President Stephen Rountree and Los Angeles Opera music director James Conlon put them above $1 million in total wages and benefits, according to the organizations' recently filed federal tax returns for the 2011-12 fiscal year that ended last June 30, the most recent period for which figures are available.
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