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Art Japan

MAGAZINE
August 13, 1995 | Judy Raphael
Shan Ichiyanachi dips a chopstick into his portable stove and comes up with a blob of molten blue corn syrup. Pulling, stretching and snipping with scissors, he adds red, green and yellow corn syrup, fashioning a sea horse with a fringed mane. The candy man has come to town. Ichiyanachi, 43, is one of two practitioners in the United States of amezaiku ("sweet candy craft"), a 1,000 year-old Asian folk art.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 24, 2005 | Myrna Oliver, Times Staff Writer
Muir Dawson, one in a line of Dawsons who ran Los Angeles' oldest continuously operating bookstore, has died. He was 83. Dawson, who oversaw the Dawson's Book Shop for more than 50 years, died Monday night in his Silver Lake home of heart failure, said his son, Michael, who owns and operates the shop now located on Larchmont Boulevard. A partner in the bookstore since 1947, Muir Dawson specialized in rare books on the history of printing.
BUSINESS
August 22, 1991 | CRISTINA LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Companies thinking about entering the Japanese market should think of the process as a never-ending courtship, according to two Orange County executives whose companies entered the Japanese market in recent years. "No matter how well I felt I knew the market, there were a lot of surprises in their business practices that delayed our business plans," said Steven M. Kishi, a vice president for international operations at Anaheim-based Carl Karcher Enterprises Inc., owner of the Carl's Jr.
NEWS
November 14, 1998 | From Associated Press
From perhaps the world's smallest kite to acrobatics by Tokyo firefighters, a once-in-a-lifetime view of Japan goes on display Sunday, back to the age before Americans opened the country to the outside world nearly 150 years ago. It is an exhibit called "Edo--Art in Japan 1615-1868." Tokyo was known as Edo in the 17th century, when it had a million inhabitants and was the world's largest city, said Earl A. Powell III, director of the National Gallery of Art.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 1, 1991 | WILLIAM WILSON, TIMES ART CRITIC
There is really nothing new about the current Western fascination with Japan. It has been thus ever since the French Impressionists discovered Japanese prints in the curio shops of Paris. Neither is there much novelty in the fact that our fascination focuses on Japanese art. Japan and its art have become synonymous in the Western mind. Germany can be conceived without thinking art, not so Japan. The latest round of beguilement seems to have a new twist.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 22, 1986 | DOUG SMITH
Every other Saturday morning, the Fuji Bonsai Nursery in Sylmar surrenders its usual serenity to become a laboratory for people taking the fast track to an ancient art form. It is do-it-yourself day in the world of bonsai. Bonsai, for those who may not know, is the practice of growing an ordinarily large tree in a small pot.
MAGAZINE
August 24, 1986 | ANDREW HORVAT, Andrew Horvat is a Times staff writer based in Tokyo
Japan's most popular practitioner of the 700-year-old craft of woodblock printing sweeps the wide sleeves of his kimono to one side and gently pushes the blade of a curved chisel into a slab of linden. With the tool, which he made by hand, the artist slowly begins carving the mirror image of an old gate in Kyoto, Japan's former capital. A 25-year resident of the ancient city, he is renowned for his defense of Japanese traditions.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 22, 1998 | STANLEY MEISLER, Stanley Meisler is a Times staff writer
In 1615, Tokugawa Ieyasu, the Japanese shogun, or military feudal overlord, defeated his remaining rivals to emerge as unchallenged ruler of Japan, bringing on 2 1/2 centuries of unprecedented peace and prosperity under army rule. The calm and the riches during the reign of 15 successive Tokugawa shoguns fostered an incredible outburst of art--on screens and scrolls and kimonos and textiles and porcelain and lacquer and helmets and woodblocks--in an era that is known as the Edo period in Japan.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 22, 2011 | By Mike Boehm, Los Angeles Times
Take a walk with genius, and there's no telling where you might end up. One day in 1953, Joe Price found himself strolling Manhattan's East Side with Frank Lloyd Wright, escorting the great architect to his pied à terre at the Plaza Hotel following a visit to the site where Wright hoped to plant his Guggenheim Museum. Suddenly, Wright got a hankering to look at Japanese woodblock prints (he avidly collected them for most of his life, and Japan is the only country outside of North America where he worked)
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