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Art Nouveau

ENTERTAINMENT
November 7, 1993 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, Suzanne Muchnic is The Times' art writer
Imagine a gallery that records 1,000 years of a great nation's arts, religion and social customs. Now imagine that this gallery is not prominently located in a major city, but that its 492 rooms are cut into a dusty brown sandstone cliff in one of the most forbidding deserts on the face of the Earth. If your visionary powers take you that far, you have a mental picture of the Mogao Grottoes--where cultural riches meet natural deprivation on the southwestern edge of the Gobi Desert.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 23, 1993 | CATHY CURTIS
It's funny how the mere mention of psychedelia is enough to start reminiscences flowing from members of the boomer generation. Art critic Dave Hickey opens his sprightly essay for "The Contemporary Psychedelic Experience," an exhibition at Chapman University's Guggenheim Gallery through April 27, with memories of seeing "the stars fall and the sky fold" back in Austin in 1965.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 29, 1993 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, TIMES ART WRITER
Interior designer Francine Alfieri Brandt didn't really believe that a huge glass wall by French artist Rene Lalique was languishing in a warehouse in South-Central Los Angeles. But last summer when she checked out the enticing tip, Brandt made an astonishing discovery: an 11x10-foot artwork composed of 165 glass panels, which experts say is an unknown masterpiece.
BOOKS
December 6, 1992 | Lee Wochner
Artists are fighters. They fight with themselves to create and they fight with each other over their creations. The founders of Art Deco were no less argumentative than any other group thinking itself on the cusp. Proud to be facing an unofficial blacklist by the proponents of the dying Art Nouveau movement, they formed their own movement, one that would smudge the barrier between those arts fine and decorative.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 10, 1992 | WILLIAM WILSON, TIMES ART CRITIC
Despite humankind's follies, nature goes on making gray and sunny days to grow her vast garden. That's probably why the Laguna Art Museum's new show of 35 California Impressionist paintings is such a relaxing turn at this time of year when spring joins hands with summer. It was organized by curator Bolton Colburn and is called "Why Paradise: Permanent Collection Paintings From the Teens and Twenties." There was a time when the museum was embarrassed by its holding of local plein-air landscapes.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 26, 1992 | WILLIAM WILSON, TIMES ART CRITIC
Despite humankind's follies, nature goes on making gray and sunny days to grow her vast garden. That's probably why the Laguna Art Museum's new show of 35 California Impressionist paintings is such a relaxing turn at this time of year when spring joins hands with summer. It was organized by curator Bolton Colburn and is called "Why Paradise: Permanent Collection Paintings From the Teens and Twenties." There was a time when the museum was embarrassed by its holding of local plein-air landscapes.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 10, 1992 | WILLIAM WILSON, TIMES ART CRITIC
There is something especially apt about showing prints to illuminate the spirit of the 19th Century. The Los Angeles County Museum of Art has done just that in "From Goya to Lautrec: 19th-Century European Prints From the Collection," a selection of about 120 European works selected from the permanent collection by curator of prints and drawings, Bruce Davis. The last century feels very close to us. Its social turmoil, urbanization and Industrial Revolution cradled our society.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 12, 1991 | BARBARA ISENBERG, Barbara Isenberg writes about the arts for The Times.
No doubt about it. In Hollywood, art is the scene. It's what industry people discuss over pasta checca and seared ahi. It represents beauty, wealth, passion, power, culture, status and celebrity. It's about deal-making and high-rolling. The players are glamorous. So is the game. From Fran and Ray Stark's museum-like sculpture garden to the beginning photography and print collections of young agents and producers, movie and TV people are involved in the art world as never before.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 10, 1990 | SUSAN FREUDENHEIM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Less an art show than a portrait of a period, "A Golden Age: Art and Society in Hungary 1896-1914" is filled with promise that is only half fulfilled. Paintings, prints, sculpture, furniture, architectural renderings, costumes, posters--and on and on--by artists little known in the West don't mix well in this exhibition opening today (to Jan. 6) at the San Diego Museum of Art. They compete and, too often, the good works are overcome by the bad.
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