Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsArt Preservation
IN THE NEWS

Art Preservation

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
June 21, 1987 | MICHAEL HIRSH, Associated Press
The art conservator counts time in centuries and a tiny loss of color over 100 years can stir deep concern. So when Keiko Keys saw pigments fade in only seven years, alarm bells sounded. Keys, an art expert from Woodacre, Calif., near San Francisco, turned to the only man she knew who could do something about it: Robert Feller of Carnegie Mellon University.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
May 23, 2010 | By Charles Burress, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Strange that no horror movie ever featured these creatures from the crypts of ancient Egypt — crocodile mummies. The toothy reptiles were embalmed and wrapped in worship of the crocodile god Sobek, and two painstakingly preserved 2,000-year-old specimens are now on display at UC Berkeley in an ancient Egypt exhibit that marks a sharp departure from touring King Tut spectacles. Berkeley's show at the Phoebe A. Hearst Museum of Anthropology is free, small and devoid of crowds.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
February 1, 1990 | ALLAN PARACHINI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Los Angeles Superior Court judge ruled Wednesday that the landmark California Art Preservation Act--enacted a decade ago to protect artworks from unauthorized alteration or destruction--is powerless to prevent demolition or painting over of murals. But in issuing the ruling, Judge Harvey A. Schneiderman observed that there is virtually no case law to act as a road map for judges called on to adjudicate cases of mural destruction and urged artists and their lawyers to appeal.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 9, 2007 | From the Associated Press
When Cleaster Graves noticed some crumbling mortar around the foundation of her family's aging Brooklyn brownstone, she turned to an unusual expert for help: her 17-year-old daughter, Corrie Thomas. "She said, 'You know what to do with this stuff. Go on and fix it!' " Thomas said. Asking the teenager to restore the foundation wasn't just wishful thinking.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 6, 1991 | SHAUNA SNOW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In what is widely viewed as a precedent-setting case with major implications for California muralists and visual artists, a California Court of Appeal judge has overturned an earlier decision that held that murals were not protected under a state law enacted to preserve works of art. The case concerns the since-bulldozed "Ancient Energies" mural painted in 1980 by three East Los Streetscapers members on a wall adjoining a Boyle Heights service station.
NEWS
July 12, 1993 | PAUL FELDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The last time Chemehuevi Indian Gertrude Leivas made full use of her native language was more than a decade ago, at her brother's funeral. "I surprised myself," the soft-spoken Leivas said, recalling her improvised eulogy. "The words came out like a string of beads." Nowadays, Leivas has no one left to speak Chemehuevi with. At 74 years of age, the bespectacled elder is a member of a species as rare as the California condor. According to the U.S.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 29, 1994 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, TIMES ART WRITER
The Margaret Fowler Memorial Garden at Scripps College in Claremont is one of Southern California's least-celebrated but best-loved hideaways. Scripps students and alumnae know the walled retreat--with its cloisters, central pool, giant wisteria, tiny chapel and expansive mural--as the most beautiful place on an idyllic campus.
BUSINESS
September 7, 1998 | DENISE HAMILTON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In 17th century Flanders, Peter Paul Rubens did conservation work on his own paintings with the tools of his day: oil paints and a brush. Masterpieces by Rubens and Rembrandt are still being restored in the late 20th century, but now the task is entrusted to trained conservators using high-tech methods that include irradiating canvases with nuclear particles to create X-ray film that shows each discrete stage in the artist's painting process.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 18, 1995 | J. MICHAEL KENNEDY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fernand Martel's work of art sits in a windowless room in the basement of a retirement home. There, in miniature, is downtown Long Beach in every detail--the Queen Mary, the oil island, the skyline and the neighborhood bungalows. Martel, who died last spring at age 75, spent years on this exact model, each building lovingly crafted. But there is a problem. Martel's work of art is showing signs of neglect. The shiny blue plastic that makes up the harbor is buckled and in need of repair.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 10, 1992 | G. BRUCE SMITH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Robert Aitchison pulls a large box from a drawer in a file cabinet, lifts the lid and reveals the contents: a hardly recognizable clump of crumpled and torn paper. His job--if the client gives him the go-ahead--will be to take that mess of paper and restore it so that it can be used in a court of law. The paper is the ship's log from an oil-drilling vessel that sank in the South China Sea and may be used as evidence in a lawsuit resulting from the disaster.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 13, 2006 | Suzanne Muchnic, Times Staff Writer
Wurms Janitorial Service will not go quietly. The shabby old building on downtown Riverside's historic pedestrian mall will be knocked down by a bulldozer at 7:30 p.m. Saturday amid a cacophony of falling bricks, stucco, wood and metal. That's what happens to eyesores when their upscale neighbors are slated for renovation. The Wurms building clings to one side of the former Rouse department store.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 27, 2006 | From Reuters
The Mona Lisa, Leonardo da Vinci's 16th century masterpiece, is in fragile condition but should not suffer too much damage if taken care of properly, experts who studied the painting closely said Tuesday. Scientists from Canada's National Research Council used special three-dimensional technology to examine both sides of the masterpiece, which was painted at some stage between 1503 and 1506 and now sits in the Louvre museum in Paris.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 2006 | Suzanne Muchnic, Times Staff Writer
Art conservators have had several centuries to figure out the nature of oil paint. They know how weather, humidity and chemical changes can affect it over time. They know how it oxidizes, cracks and turns yellow and how to clean it. Modern paints, made over the last 70 years with an ever-expanding array of synthetic products, are much more perplexing. Help is on the way in "Modern Paints," a symposium at Tate Modern in London today through Thursday.
NEWS
January 12, 2006 | From Associated Press
A Mozart manuscript that was torn in half by his widow will be reconstituted this year as part of celebrations marking the 250th anniversary of the composer's birth, the British Library said Wednesday. Mozart's widow, Constanze, tore the work in two in 1835 to boost its value, giving or selling the upper portion to a court musician, Julius Leidke. She sent the lower portion to a local government official in Bavaria.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 28, 2005 | From Associated Press
The documentary "Hoop Dreams" and footage of the 1906 San Francisco earthquake are among the 25 movies picked this year for the National Film Registry, a compilation of significant films being preserved by the Library of Congress. Fictional films chosen by Librarian of Congress James H. Billington range from the Buster Keaton comedy "The Cameraman" to the Christmas classic "Miracle on 34th Street" to the 1982 teen comedy "Fast Times at Ridgemont High."
ENTERTAINMENT
October 23, 2005 | Lynne Heffley
THREATENED by the wear and tear of the ages -- never mind periodic and predictable fig-leaf controversies -- Michelangelo's iconic masterpiece "David" was in need of major restoration to reverse the effects of environmental damage and well-meant but misguided restoration efforts. Enter independent restoration expert Cinzia Parnigoni.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 6, 2001 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Costa Mesa City Council on Monday is expected to consider allowing the city to preserve cultural resources within South Coast Plaza. If the proposal passes, owners of designated sites must apply to change their property. The plaza includes the outdoor sculpture garden "California Scenario." The council has asked owner CommonWealth Partners LLC to preserve it. CommonWealth said it doesn't want to alter the garden but also doesn't want to be responsible for it forever.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 6, 2005 | From Associated Press
Astronaut Neil Armstrong's first words from the moon, speeches by President Woodrow Wilson and Gen. Douglas MacArthur and songs by Al Jolson, Muddy Waters and Nirvana are among 50 recordings being set aside for special preservation by the Library of Congress. The library on Tuesday announced the new selections for its National Recording Registry. News broadcasts include Wilson's speech of Nov. 11, 1923, celebrating the fifth anniversary of the armistice that ended World War I.
MAGAZINE
September 18, 2005 | Michael A. Hiltzik, Michael A. Hiltzik writes the "Golden State" business column for The Times. His latest book is "The Plot Against Social Security."
Garbed improbably but characteristically in a worn denim shirt and a faded trucker's cap, Rene di Rosa is apologizing for his faltering memory. We are in the main room of the gray stone house that was his residence for the better part of 30 years.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 6, 2005 | From Associated Press
Astronaut Neil Armstrong's first words from the moon, speeches by President Woodrow Wilson and Gen. Douglas MacArthur and songs by Al Jolson, Muddy Waters and Nirvana are among 50 recordings being set aside for special preservation by the Library of Congress. The library on Tuesday announced the new selections for its National Recording Registry. News broadcasts include Wilson's speech of Nov. 11, 1923, celebrating the fifth anniversary of the armistice that ended World War I.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|