Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsArt Preservation
IN THE NEWS

Art Preservation

ENTERTAINMENT
April 6, 2005 | From Associated Press
Astronaut Neil Armstrong's first words from the moon, speeches by President Woodrow Wilson and Gen. Douglas MacArthur and songs by Al Jolson, Muddy Waters and Nirvana are among 50 recordings being set aside for special preservation by the Library of Congress. The library on Tuesday announced the new selections for its National Recording Registry. News broadcasts include Wilson's speech of Nov. 11, 1923, celebrating the fifth anniversary of the armistice that ended World War I.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 20, 2005 | Wendy Thermos, Times Staff Writer
A monolithic public artwork has become a cultural irony in downtown Los Angeles. Despite its size, it is easy to miss by passersby. When it was erected in 1962, the 80-foot by 20-foot mosaic mural in front of the Los Angeles County Hall of Records stood as a glittery testament to the region's booming growth. Today the mural -- a highly stylized topographical map of Los Angeles County fashioned by one of the nation's best-known mosaic artists -- is dingy and decaying.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 4, 2005 | From Reuters
Custodians of Michelangelo's "David" are thinking of blasting air at dusty, sweaty tourists to stop them from sullying the Renaissance sex symbol. Months after a painstaking and costly cleanup of the 500-year-old nude statue, experts at the Galleria dell'Accademia in Florence, Italy found dust and humidity brought in by streams of tourists had begun to tarnish their top crowd-puller again.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 13, 2002 | SCOTT MARTELLE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
You can see the past etched into the face of a boulder in the Bowers Museum courtyard, a maze of thin lines created by Native Americans thousands of years before Orange County's landscape succumbed to cul-de-sacs and freeways, industrial parks and glass cathedrals. This ancient maze, hauled in from the nearby Santa Ana Mountains, is one of the few samples of tribal rock art on exhibit locally.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 4, 2001 | PATRICIA WARD BIEDERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ron Stark has a vanity license plate that reads "CEL DR." The plate doesn't lie. Stark was a pioneer and remains one of the few conservators to specialize in animation art. Animation cels--individual pieces of art on clear plastic created by the thousands to make animated films--were typically used once, then discarded. Today, surviving cels are treasured by collectors who count "Cinderella" and "101 Dalmatians" among the happiest landmarks of childhood.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 21, 2001 | JOHN JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Alarmed by vandalism at an archeological treasure here, federal and state officials are studying ways to use modern technology, perhaps even orbiting satellites, to prevent destruction of ancient artifacts. Painted Rock, in the Carrizo Plain National Monument, is a world-class site of ancient Native American art, revered equally by Indians and archeologists. Its red ocher drawings of horned figures and geometric shapes dating back a thousand years attract visitors from the world over.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 6, 2001 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Costa Mesa City Council on Monday is expected to consider allowing the city to preserve cultural resources within South Coast Plaza. If the proposal passes, owners of designated sites must apply to change their property. The plaza includes the outdoor sculpture garden "California Scenario." The council has asked owner CommonWealth Partners LLC to preserve it. CommonWealth said it doesn't want to alter the garden but also doesn't want to be responsible for it forever.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 1, 2001 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, TIMES ART WRITER
"The Broadway Mural," John Valadez's landmark, 60-foot-long painting of downtown Los Angeles street life, has been rescued from the auction block. Peter Norton, a Los Angeles-based computer guru and a major collector of contemporary art, has purchased the epic artwork, along with a group of 28 portraits by Valadez.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 30, 2000 | GREG RISLING, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The future of a half-mile-long mural in Valley Glen that chronicles the history of Los Angeles, particularly struggles by ethnic groups, remains in financial limbo. Supporters have begun raising $500,000 to restore the fading canvas while seeking another $1 million to finish the timeline.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 30, 2000 | GREG RISLING, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The future of a half-mile-long mural chronicling the city's history, particularly struggles by ethnic groups, remains in financial limbo. Supporters have begun raising $500,000 to restore the fading cultural canvas while seeking $1 million more to finish the timeline.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|