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Art Preservation

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 13, 2002 | SCOTT MARTELLE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
You can see the past etched into the face of a boulder in the Bowers Museum courtyard, a maze of thin lines created by Native Americans thousands of years before Orange County's landscape succumbed to cul-de-sacs and freeways, industrial parks and glass cathedrals. This ancient maze, hauled in from the nearby Santa Ana Mountains, is one of the few samples of tribal rock art on exhibit locally.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 4, 2001 | PATRICIA WARD BIEDERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ron Stark has a vanity license plate that reads "CEL DR." The plate doesn't lie. Stark was a pioneer and remains one of the few conservators to specialize in animation art. Animation cels--individual pieces of art on clear plastic created by the thousands to make animated films--were typically used once, then discarded. Today, surviving cels are treasured by collectors who count "Cinderella" and "101 Dalmatians" among the happiest landmarks of childhood.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 21, 2001 | JOHN JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Alarmed by vandalism at an archeological treasure here, federal and state officials are studying ways to use modern technology, perhaps even orbiting satellites, to prevent destruction of ancient artifacts. Painted Rock, in the Carrizo Plain National Monument, is a world-class site of ancient Native American art, revered equally by Indians and archeologists. Its red ocher drawings of horned figures and geometric shapes dating back a thousand years attract visitors from the world over.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 6, 2001 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Costa Mesa City Council on Monday is expected to consider allowing the city to preserve cultural resources within South Coast Plaza. If the proposal passes, owners of designated sites must apply to change their property. The plaza includes the outdoor sculpture garden "California Scenario." The council has asked owner CommonWealth Partners LLC to preserve it. CommonWealth said it doesn't want to alter the garden but also doesn't want to be responsible for it forever.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 1, 2001 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, TIMES ART WRITER
"The Broadway Mural," John Valadez's landmark, 60-foot-long painting of downtown Los Angeles street life, has been rescued from the auction block. Peter Norton, a Los Angeles-based computer guru and a major collector of contemporary art, has purchased the epic artwork, along with a group of 28 portraits by Valadez.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 30, 2000 | GREG RISLING, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The future of a half-mile-long mural in Valley Glen that chronicles the history of Los Angeles, particularly struggles by ethnic groups, remains in financial limbo. Supporters have begun raising $500,000 to restore the fading canvas while seeking another $1 million to finish the timeline.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 30, 2000 | GREG RISLING, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The future of a half-mile-long mural chronicling the city's history, particularly struggles by ethnic groups, remains in financial limbo. Supporters have begun raising $500,000 to restore the fading cultural canvas while seeking $1 million more to finish the timeline.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 6, 2000 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, Suzanne Muchnic is The Times' art writer
Mexican muralist David Alfaro Siqueiros conceived and painted his Los Angeles masterpiece--an 18-foot-by-80-foot painting known as "America Tropical"--in a mere two months during the late summer and early fall of 1932. Commissioned by the owner of an art gallery on the city's historic Olvera Street, Siqueiros designed a vast painting for an exterior, second-floor wall of Italian Hall, facing a rooftop beer garden that overlooked the pedestrian zone lined with Mexican shops.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 16, 2000 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The statistics are still sobering--half the movies made before 1950 no longer exist, having been lost, destroyed or having deteriorated beyond repair. But these days film preservationists don't feel like they are fighting as much of a losing battle. In the past decade, studios and audiences have become far more savvy regarding the need for preserving film--an awareness driven in part by cable's American Movie Classics' annual Film Preservation Festival, which begins today on the cable network.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 23, 2000 | GREG RISLING, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Much as struggles and hardships are depicted on its mural spanning half a mile in a Van Nuys flood control channel, an organization of artists that spent seven years painting the expansive "Great Wall of Los Angeles" is entrenched in its own battle. Faced with watching their work peel, crack and fade, the artists hope to find funding to restore the weather-beaten mural lest they lose what some consider a cultural landmark.
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