Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsArt School
IN THE NEWS

Art School

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
May 26, 2007 | From the Associated Press
A Campbell's Soup heiress has given a second gift of $25 million to the University of the Arts in Philadelphia. Philanthropist Dorrance H. Hamilton's donation, announced this week, matches one she made in November and increases the university's endowment to more than $75 million. The fund stood at only $17 million a year ago. Hamilton is the granddaughter of Campbell's Soup founder John T. Dorrance. Her donations are the largest in the school's 130-year history.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
April 15, 2014 | By Mike Boehm
A new documentary film is the latest chapter in an ongoing effort to keep alive the memory of the defunct Chouinard Art Institute as a foundation slab in L.A.'s rise to art world prominence. “Curly,” produced and directed by Gianina Ferreyra, addresses the influential school's history from 1921 to 1972, when it was subsumed into the newly established California Institute of the Arts, and the 21st century effort to rekindle awareness of Chouinard. The 51-minute film's first showing is 6:30 p.m. Thursday in the community room of the South Pasadena Public Library, accompanied by a panel discussion involving a number of L.A. art luminaries connected to Chouinard, including Larry Bell, Chaz Bojorquez, Llyn Foulkes and John Van Hamersveld.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
May 4, 1986 | ELIZABETH VENANT
"The hippie with the sandals is dead," says Kraig Cavanaugh, standing on a blue milk crate and painting an oversize cut-out of a fleshy woman. A student at Valencia's California Institute of the Arts, Cavanaugh works in a white art studio splashed with graffiti. Balloons from his 24th birthday party festoon the entrance; inside, cigarette butts speckle the floor and a leprous green sofa stands in a state of terminal dilapidation.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 2014 | By Rebecca Keegan
Oscar's animated feature race is a clash of the major Hollywood studios this year, with Disney, Fox/DreamWorks and Universal/Illumination all contending. But one movie in the mix -- a French-Belgian production about the unlikely friendship between a mouse and a bear -- is the sort that is alien to the high-stakes U.S. animation industry. Made with hand-painted watercolor backgrounds and a modest $12-million price tag, "Ernest & Celestine," which U.S. distributor GKIDS will release in Los Angeles on Friday, is based on a whimsical series of children's books by reclusive Brussels-born author Gabrielle Vincent.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 6, 2007 | Valerie J. Nelson, Times Staff Writer
Paul Brach, a painter and founding dean of the school of art at California Institute of the Arts who revolutionized teaching of the discipline by insisting that it reflect what is going on in contemporary art, has died. He was 83. Brach died of prostate cancer Nov. 16 at his home in East Hampton, N.Y., said Eleanor Flomenhaft, whose New York City gallery exhibits his work. Steven D.
NEWS
August 13, 1992
An art school designed to keep African-American youngsters away from gangs is in trouble with City Hall and has 30 days to correct code violations or it will be shut down. The Pan African Art School, 2240 Atlantic Ave., was cited Tuesday for a number of violations, including faulty wiring. School founder Akinsanya Kambon took his complaints to the City Council this week and was told he has 30 days to comply with the city's regulations. That may not be enough time, however, Kambon said Wednesday.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 2003 | Suzanne Muchnic, Times Staff Writer
"There's no point in starting another art school -- unless it's educationally unique, it's run by practicing artists, it's based on student needs, it re-focuses on fundamentals, it has community support, it has solid financial backing and it has a meaningful name." That's the message on the cover of Grand View, the quarterly bulletin of the Chouinard Foundation, a nonprofit organization in South Pasadena.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 4, 2012 | By Esmeralda Bermudez, Los Angeles Times
Their faces are vague, the color of coffee beans, but before Ramiro Gomez heads out with pliers and wire to install them, he gives each one a name. There was Guillermina, named for his Aunt Guille, a housekeeper at a casino hotel; Maria Elena, after his mom, a janitor at an elementary school; and Luis, like Uncle Luis, who delivers meat for a carniceria . For the last eight months, Gomez, an artist from West Hollywood, has made the invisible visible by installing life-size cardboard cutouts of nannies, gardeners, valet workers and housekeepers in Beverly Hills, the Hollywood Hills and other wealthy areas.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 16, 2012 | By Jori Finkel
Michael Asher, the groundbreaking L.A. conceptual artist and veteran CalArts teacher, died Sunday night after a long illness. He was 69. A teacher at CalArts since the early 1970s, Asher was famous in the classroom for his wit and candor -- and also his endurance. His marathon "crit" (critique) sessions, designed to review student work, could by his own account run from 10 a.m. to midnight. "I throw away the clock," he once told me. His own artwork is often described as institutional critique or engagement -- work that grows out of the particular conditions of a museum or gallery environment.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 17, 2012 | Jori Finkel
Michael Asher, the pioneering conceptual artist who challenged expectations of what constitutes a work of art and what happens during an art critique, died in his sleep at his Los Angeles home early Monday after several years of poor health. He was 69. His death was confirmed by his assistant, Yoko Kanayama. A teacher at the California Institute of the Arts since 1973, Asher was famous for his wit and candor -- and marathon-style "crits," or critiques, that left vivid memories with generations of students.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 26, 2013 | By Mike Boehm
Brian Dennehy will be extending his current L.A. run by one performance -- not in Sebastian Barry's “The Steward of Christendom” at the Mark Taper Forum, which closes Jan. 5, but in a Jan. 6 benefit for the Los Angeles County High School for the Arts, in which he'll be surrounded by family. Dennehy's two grandsons attend the public arts high school and their parents, veteran stage actors Elizabeth Dennehy and James Lancaster, will support the star in a series of scenes on the school's stage from plays that Dennehy has starred in or has on his list of coveted roles not yet tackled.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 18, 2013 | By Howard Blume
Philanthropist Eli Broad has donated $250,000 to the downtown arts high school, officially signaling his influential approval for a high-profile, high-cost campus that has struggled to win civic support since opening in 2009. The gift is a significant windfall for one school, but more important than the amount was the signal that it sends to the arts and philanthropy establishment, which has never fully embraced the $232-million arts high school. A primary reason for this distance was the example set by Broad himself, who withheld financial support over concerns about the school's management.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 18, 2013 | By Howard Blume
Philanthropist Eli Broad has donated $250,000 to the downtown arts high school, officially signaling his influential approval for a high-profile, high-cost campus that has struggled to win civic support since opening in 2009. The gift is a significant windfall for one school, but more important than the amount was the signal that it sends to the arts and philanthropy establishment, which has never fully embraced the $232-million Cortines High School of Visual & Performing Arts. A primary reason for this distance was the example set by Broad himself, who withheld financial support over concerns about the school's management by the Los Angeles Unified School District.
WORLD
September 25, 2013 | By Barbara Demick
BEIJING - He was a poor man selling sausages and chicken from an unlicensed food cart in hope of earning enough money to send his talented young son to an art school in the capital. Outside a market in northeast China on a spring day, two municipal officers, members of a notoriously brutal force known as chengguan , confiscated Xia Junfeng's cooking equipment and took him in for questioning. Xia said it quickly turned into a beating. Soon, both officers were dead, stabbed with a small knife Xia kept in his pocket for slicing sausages.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 30, 2013 | By Howard Blume
The third time was the charm in efforts to land a high-profile New York City educator to head the $232-million downtown Los Angeles arts high school. Or was it the fourth time? Kim Bruno, the longtime head of the LaGuardia High School of Music & Art and Performing Arts, has accepted the job of principal at the Cortines School of Visual and Performing Arts. Bruno had tentatively accepted the post at the 4-year-old campus at least twice before, but this time officials in the Los Angeles Unified School District are certain that she is switching coasts.
OPINION
July 18, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
Not everything that's gone wrong at Los Angeles' school of the arts is the fault of the L.A. Unified School District. Just most of it. Four years ago, in the midst of the recession, with the staff and curriculum still not in place, the district foolishly decided it would nonetheless open the school that fall. To make matters worse, then-school board President Monica Garcia wielded her considerable power to subvert the intended goal of making this a premier regional arts school, and instead turned the $232-million Cortines School of Visual and Performing Arts into a neighborhood-oriented school with 70% of the seats reserved for students who live nearby.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 3, 1987 | MARCOS BRETON, Times Staff Writer
Thurl Ravenscroft's rich voice dipped low and deep as he began to utter what has become the trademark of his 50-year show business career. "They're g-r-r-r-eat!!!" Ravenscroft boomed as he recreated the role of Tony the Tiger, a role that the 73-year-old has performed in scores of television commercials for a cereal company for 36 years. "The Tony the Tiger commercial has been done for every English-speaking (country) in the world. . . .
ENTERTAINMENT
April 15, 2014 | By Mike Boehm
A new documentary film is the latest chapter in an ongoing effort to keep alive the memory of the defunct Chouinard Art Institute as a foundation slab in L.A.'s rise to art world prominence. “Curly,” produced and directed by Gianina Ferreyra, addresses the influential school's history from 1921 to 1972, when it was subsumed into the newly established California Institute of the Arts, and the 21st century effort to rekindle awareness of Chouinard. The 51-minute film's first showing is 6:30 p.m. Thursday in the community room of the South Pasadena Public Library, accompanied by a panel discussion involving a number of L.A. art luminaries connected to Chouinard, including Larry Bell, Chaz Bojorquez, Llyn Foulkes and John Van Hamersveld.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 14, 2013 | By Howard Blume
One principal quit even before the flagship arts high school in downtown Los Angeles enrolled its first students in 2009. The school opened with two leaders, and both were gone by the end of the first year. The next principal lasted a year. Two high-profile principals from arts high schools elsewhere accepted the job twice - and backed out twice. Now it's happened again. After less than two years on the job, Norman Isaacs has resigned as principal of the Cortines School of Visual and Performing Arts.
NEWS
July 9, 2013 | By Christopher Knight, Los Angeles Times Art Critic
When the Orange County Museum of Art decided to change its biennial survey of California art to a triennial survey of art made around the Pacific Rim -- including California - it took on a huge task. The Pacific Ocean is vast, lapping the shore in parts of Asia, Australia, South and Central America and more. The change also raised a question: For art, is there really such a meaningful entity as “the Pacific Rim”? As I noted in my review of the debut 2013 California-Pacific Triennial, the answer is pretty much no. The majority of the 32 artists in the OCMA show have gone to art school or lived in the U.S. and Europe, so artistically they speak an intelligible common language.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|