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ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 1988
I was sorry to read of Michael Rissi's current plight with USC's School of Cinema-Television. It doesn't, however, surprise me. As I understand it, after I left the cinema school and took "Dark Star" with me, USC instituted a policy of complete and total ownership of all films made there. I really don't understand how anyone can take Rissi's script away from him and give it to someone else to direct. USC is a school , not a studio. Although this sort of behavior is good training for the real world of Hollywood, I fail to see any circumstances that would excuse this exploitation of talent by a university.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 7, 2012 | By Jasmine Elist, Los Angeles Times
When it comes to home decorating on a budget, art options get generic pretty fast. Between mass-produced images of Marilyn Monroe or New York City's taxicabs sold at big box retail stores, the works covering the walls of people's homes aren't chosen because they're particularly fresh or unique but because they are affordable and accessible. In the hopes of providing a more interesting alternative, recent University of Michigan graduates and 24-year-old L.A. natives Chelsea Neman and Jordan Klein co-founded the Tappan Collective, an online gallery selling original work by emerging artists.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 15, 2014 | By Mike Boehm
A new documentary film is the latest chapter in an ongoing effort to keep alive the memory of the defunct Chouinard Art Institute as a foundation slab in L.A.'s rise to art world prominence. “Curly,” produced and directed by Gianina Ferreyra, addresses the influential school's history from 1921 to 1972, when it was subsumed into the newly established California Institute of the Arts, and the 21st century effort to rekindle awareness of Chouinard. The 51-minute film's first showing is 6:30 p.m. Thursday in the community room of the South Pasadena Public Library, accompanied by a panel discussion involving a number of L.A. art luminaries connected to Chouinard, including Larry Bell, Chaz Bojorquez, Llyn Foulkes and John Van Hamersveld.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 10, 2013 | By L.J. Williamson
Despite the chicken-in-every-pot hype over consumer-level 3-D printers, the technology still has a long way to go to be usable, or useful, for the average Joe. Designing three-dimensional objects on a two-dimensional computer screen is no simple task, especially for those unskilled in computer-assisted design or software. And for most people, there's no compelling reason to make a unique object from scratch when mass-produced equivalents are cheaper and simpler. But for some artists, 3-D printing has been a revelation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 31, 1987 | BOB POOL, Times Staff Writer
Capturing the soul of Woodland Hills is quite a feat. And capturing the soles of Woodland Hills means quite a few feet. Jill Ann Field is doing both as she paints a mural on a quarter-mile-long wooden safety wall around a high-rise construction site. Field is letting Warner Center office workers and neighborhood joggers step into her illustration by painting images of their feet as they pass the building site at 21550 Oxnard St.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 2013 | By Todd Martens
AUSTIN, Texas -- Outspoken rock 'n' roll balladeer Nick Cave traced his beginnings from “rural Australia” to the more comforting confines of his own imagination in a sprawling, hour-long chat at the South by Southwest music conference here. The standing-room-only Tuesday conversation focused largely on Cave's biographical history. The facts of the real world, however, weren't of as much interest to Cave as the more abstract matters of art. Speaking of his relationship with spouse Susie Bick, Cave said, “I feel that I know her better in the songs that I write about her than I do in real life.” Speaking of wanting to leave rural Australia for Melbourne, and then later Melbourne for London and then London for New York, Cave said, “Culturally, life has been a series of disappointments.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 19, 2012 | By Holly Myers, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Analia Saban went to art school at the height of the recent market boom, when it was not uncommon for students, particularly in UCLA's prestigious painting program, to be fielding offers from galleries and selling work directly out of their studios. It had a significant impact on the direction of her career, though not because she profited by it at the time. Indeed, she had a rough go of it. Raised in Buenos Aires, she came to Los Angeles in 2002 by way of a small college in New Orleans, where she studied video art primarily.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 3, 2008 | Irene Lacher, Special to The Times
Imagine that Vermeer has been transported to a downtown Los Angeles loft, far from the dank studio in the Netherlands he frequented three centuries or so ago. No longer does embryonic, 17th century technology limit the information his portraits can impart about their subjects -- a celestial globe on a table, say, doubling as the artist's tool to show the painting's subject was an astronomer.
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