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ENTERTAINMENT
March 10, 2013 | By L.J. Williamson
Despite the chicken-in-every-pot hype over consumer-level 3-D printers, the technology still has a long way to go to be usable, or useful, for the average Joe. Designing three-dimensional objects on a two-dimensional computer screen is no simple task, especially for those unskilled in computer-assisted design or software. And for most people, there's no compelling reason to make a unique object from scratch when mass-produced equivalents are cheaper and simpler. But for some artists, 3-D printing has been a revelation.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 28, 2012 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
I first encountered Julia Wertz with her 2010 graphic memoir “Drinking at the Movies,” a relentless and, at times, lacerating self-portrait of the artist as a young woman wrestling with alcohol. “Drinking at the Movies” was not Wertz's first autobiographical comic - her earlier work is gathered in two collections, “The Fart Party Vol. 1” and “The Fart Party Vol. 2” - but it represents a bridge between the narrow form of the comic strip (many of its chapters are a single page)
ENTERTAINMENT
June 20, 2013 | By Rebecca Keegan
BERKELEY - On the University of California campus recently, a tour guide told a group of prospective students about the many opportunities open to those studying in the Bay Area - "like getting an internship at Pixar," she said. The Emeryville animation studio is four miles away, but that day Pixar was even closer than the tour guide knew - director Dan Scanlon and three of his colleagues were walking right behind her, on their way to Sather Gate, a bit of Beaux-Arts architecture that had served as creative inspiration for Pixar's new film, "Monsters University," which opens Friday.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 1, 2011 | By Scarlet Cheng, Special to the Los Angeles Times
When Charlotte Salomon died in Auschwitz at age 26, she left behind an unperformed opera: "Life? Or Theatre?" It was in the form of 1,300 paintings — initially accompanied by overlays with words, and then, when she felt increasingly rushed, the words were written directly on the images. Sometimes they conveyed dialogue, sometimes a running narrative of a dramatic and tragic life — Charlotte's life, the names changed ever so slightly. In 1940 she had shut herself up in a hotel in the south of France, a Jewish refugee from Nazi Germany, and had produced these works in a feverish pitch of 18 months.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 2014 | By Rebecca Keegan
Oscar's animated feature race is a clash of the major Hollywood studios this year, with Disney, Fox/DreamWorks and Universal/Illumination all contending. But one movie in the mix -- a French-Belgian production about the unlikely friendship between a mouse and a bear -- is the sort that is alien to the high-stakes U.S. animation industry. Made with hand-painted watercolor backgrounds and a modest $12-million price tag, "Ernest & Celestine," which U.S. distributor GKIDS will release in Los Angeles on Friday, is based on a whimsical series of children's books by reclusive Brussels-born author Gabrielle Vincent.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 1988
I was sorry to read of Michael Rissi's current plight with USC's School of Cinema-Television. It doesn't, however, surprise me. As I understand it, after I left the cinema school and took "Dark Star" with me, USC instituted a policy of complete and total ownership of all films made there. I really don't understand how anyone can take Rissi's script away from him and give it to someone else to direct. USC is a school , not a studio. Although this sort of behavior is good training for the real world of Hollywood, I fail to see any circumstances that would excuse this exploitation of talent by a university.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 7, 2012 | By Jasmine Elist, Los Angeles Times
When it comes to home decorating on a budget, art options get generic pretty fast. Between mass-produced images of Marilyn Monroe or New York City's taxicabs sold at big box retail stores, the works covering the walls of people's homes aren't chosen because they're particularly fresh or unique but because they are affordable and accessible. In the hopes of providing a more interesting alternative, recent University of Michigan graduates and 24-year-old L.A. natives Chelsea Neman and Jordan Klein co-founded the Tappan Collective, an online gallery selling original work by emerging artists.
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