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ENTERTAINMENT
March 10, 2013 | By L.J. Williamson
Despite the chicken-in-every-pot hype over consumer-level 3-D printers, the technology still has a long way to go to be usable, or useful, for the average Joe. Designing three-dimensional objects on a two-dimensional computer screen is no simple task, especially for those unskilled in computer-assisted design or software. And for most people, there's no compelling reason to make a unique object from scratch when mass-produced equivalents are cheaper and simpler. But for some artists, 3-D printing has been a revelation.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 31, 1987 | BOB POOL, Times Staff Writer
Capturing the soul of Woodland Hills is quite a feat. And capturing the soles of Woodland Hills means quite a few feet. Jill Ann Field is doing both as she paints a mural on a quarter-mile-long wooden safety wall around a high-rise construction site. Field is letting Warner Center office workers and neighborhood joggers step into her illustration by painting images of their feet as they pass the building site at 21550 Oxnard St.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 2014 | By Rebecca Keegan
Oscar's animated feature race is a clash of the major Hollywood studios this year, with Disney, Fox/DreamWorks and Universal/Illumination all contending. But one movie in the mix -- a French-Belgian production about the unlikely friendship between a mouse and a bear -- is the sort that is alien to the high-stakes U.S. animation industry. Made with hand-painted watercolor backgrounds and a modest $12-million price tag, "Ernest & Celestine," which U.S. distributor GKIDS will release in Los Angeles on Friday, is based on a whimsical series of children's books by reclusive Brussels-born author Gabrielle Vincent.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 19, 2012 | By Holly Myers, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Analia Saban went to art school at the height of the recent market boom, when it was not uncommon for students, particularly in UCLA's prestigious painting program, to be fielding offers from galleries and selling work directly out of their studios. It had a significant impact on the direction of her career, though not because she profited by it at the time. Indeed, she had a rough go of it. Raised in Buenos Aires, she came to Los Angeles in 2002 by way of a small college in New Orleans, where she studied video art primarily.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 3, 1992
Publicizing Chaka's hopes for financial aid to attend Cal State Northridge baffled my mind. Has this man considered the amount of money he has cost state and local government to continue to process him through the legal system? Add the cost to undo the damage he inflicted. We enjoyed a temporary respite from his "tagging" sprees while he was incarcerated (yet another considerable expense) and now he wants financial aid for art school. Ha! However, there may be a solution to satisfy all of us staunch, tax-paying, law-abiding citizens: Calculate the amount of money Daniel (Chaka)
ENTERTAINMENT
August 7, 2012 | By Chris Barton
The story of the internment of more than 100,000 Japanese Americans during World War II hasn't always gotten widespread attention in the United States. But with construction beginning on the new Topaz Museum and Education Center in Utah, another step is being taken to keep the memory alive. In a groundbreaking ceremony on Sunday that featured Taiko drumming and a book signing by former Japanese internment camp resident turned Disney animator Willie Ito, the museum began work on a location some 16 miles away from the original Topaz camp.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 16, 2012 | By Jori Finkel
Michael Asher, the groundbreaking L.A. conceptual artist and veteran CalArts teacher, died Sunday night after a long illness. He was 69. A teacher at CalArts since the early 1970s, Asher was famous in the classroom for his wit and candor -- and also his endurance. His marathon "crit" (critique) sessions, designed to review student work, could by his own account run from 10 a.m. to midnight. "I throw away the clock," he once told me. His own artwork is often described as institutional critique or engagement -- work that grows out of the particular conditions of a museum or gallery environment.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 15, 2001
I read Christopher Knight's article about the plight of art schools with some amusement ("Art for School's Sake," July 8). I was one of those who would have loved the chance to learn technique. Instead, I paid hundreds of dollars a unit at a "Good" (by his definition) art school, where students "are encouraged from the first day to stop thinking of themselves as students and to start thinking of themselves as working artists." In this atmosphere of self-indulgence and self-importance, we "learned" to paint using house paint on butcher paper and other such useless exercises.
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