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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 3, 1987 | MARCOS BRETON, Times Staff Writer
Thurl Ravenscroft's rich voice dipped low and deep as he began to utter what has become the trademark of his 50-year show business career. "They're g-r-r-r-eat!!!" Ravenscroft boomed as he recreated the role of Tony the Tiger, a role that the 73-year-old has performed in scores of television commercials for a cereal company for 36 years. "The Tony the Tiger commercial has been done for every English-speaking (country) in the world. . . .
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 6, 2013 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
Neil Gaiman has a message for graduates: “Make Good Art.” That's the point of his stirring 2012 commencement address at Philadelphia's University of the Arts, widely disseminated across the Internet, which is like David Foster Wallace's “This is Water” for a different generation, a call for self-expression and the courage to invent your own life. These, of course, are classic tropes to share at a graduation; I think of the 2005 Stanford University commencement at which Steve Jobs warned , “Your time is limited, so don't waste it living someone else's life.” And yet, Gaiman's speech is inspiring not because it offers any cautions, but rather because it eschews the whole idea of caution, suggesting instead that it's in our best interest to break - or even better, to ignore - the rules.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 7, 2012 | By Chris Barton
The story of the internment of more than 100,000 Japanese Americans during World War II hasn't always gotten widespread attention in the United States. But with construction beginning on the new Topaz Museum and Education Center in Utah, another step is being taken to keep the memory alive. In a groundbreaking ceremony on Sunday that featured Taiko drumming and a book signing by former Japanese internment camp resident turned Disney animator Willie Ito, the museum began work on a location some 16 miles away from the original Topaz camp.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 10, 2013 | By L.J. Williamson
Despite the chicken-in-every-pot hype over consumer-level 3-D printers, the technology still has a long way to go to be usable, or useful, for the average Joe. Designing three-dimensional objects on a two-dimensional computer screen is no simple task, especially for those unskilled in computer-assisted design or software. And for most people, there's no compelling reason to make a unique object from scratch when mass-produced equivalents are cheaper and simpler. But for some artists, 3-D printing has been a revelation.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 2014 | By Rebecca Keegan
Oscar's animated feature race is a clash of the major Hollywood studios this year, with Disney, Fox/DreamWorks and Universal/Illumination all contending. But one movie in the mix -- a French-Belgian production about the unlikely friendship between a mouse and a bear -- is the sort that is alien to the high-stakes U.S. animation industry. Made with hand-painted watercolor backgrounds and a modest $12-million price tag, "Ernest & Celestine," which U.S. distributor GKIDS will release in Los Angeles on Friday, is based on a whimsical series of children's books by reclusive Brussels-born author Gabrielle Vincent.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 17, 2012 | Jori Finkel
Michael Asher, the pioneering conceptual artist who challenged expectations of what constitutes a work of art and what happens during an art critique, died in his sleep at his Los Angeles home early Monday after several years of poor health. He was 69. His death was confirmed by his assistant, Yoko Kanayama. A teacher at the California Institute of the Arts since 1973, Asher was famous for his wit and candor -- and marathon-style "crits," or critiques, that left vivid memories with generations of students.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 1988
I was sorry to read of Michael Rissi's current plight with USC's School of Cinema-Television. It doesn't, however, surprise me. As I understand it, after I left the cinema school and took "Dark Star" with me, USC instituted a policy of complete and total ownership of all films made there. I really don't understand how anyone can take Rissi's script away from him and give it to someone else to direct. USC is a school , not a studio. Although this sort of behavior is good training for the real world of Hollywood, I fail to see any circumstances that would excuse this exploitation of talent by a university.
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