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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 4, 2012 | By Esmeralda Bermudez, Los Angeles Times
Their faces are vague, the color of coffee beans, but before Ramiro Gomez heads out with pliers and wire to install them, he gives each one a name. There was Guillermina, named for his Aunt Guille, a housekeeper at a casino hotel; Maria Elena, after his mom, a janitor at an elementary school; and Luis, like Uncle Luis, who delivers meat for a carniceria . For the last eight months, Gomez, an artist from West Hollywood, has made the invisible visible by installing life-size cardboard cutouts of nannies, gardeners, valet workers and housekeepers in Beverly Hills, the Hollywood Hills and other wealthy areas.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 7, 2012 | By Chris Barton
The story of the internment of more than 100,000 Japanese Americans during World War II hasn't always gotten widespread attention in the United States. But with construction beginning on the new Topaz Museum and Education Center in Utah, another step is being taken to keep the memory alive. In a groundbreaking ceremony on Sunday that featured Taiko drumming and a book signing by former Japanese internment camp resident turned Disney animator Willie Ito, the museum began work on a location some 16 miles away from the original Topaz camp.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 2014 | By Rebecca Keegan
Oscar's animated feature race is a clash of the major Hollywood studios this year, with Disney, Fox/DreamWorks and Universal/Illumination all contending. But one movie in the mix -- a French-Belgian production about the unlikely friendship between a mouse and a bear -- is the sort that is alien to the high-stakes U.S. animation industry. Made with hand-painted watercolor backgrounds and a modest $12-million price tag, "Ernest & Celestine," which U.S. distributor GKIDS will release in Los Angeles on Friday, is based on a whimsical series of children's books by reclusive Brussels-born author Gabrielle Vincent.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 1988
I was sorry to read of Michael Rissi's current plight with USC's School of Cinema-Television. It doesn't, however, surprise me. As I understand it, after I left the cinema school and took "Dark Star" with me, USC instituted a policy of complete and total ownership of all films made there. I really don't understand how anyone can take Rissi's script away from him and give it to someone else to direct. USC is a school , not a studio. Although this sort of behavior is good training for the real world of Hollywood, I fail to see any circumstances that would excuse this exploitation of talent by a university.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 7, 2012 | By Jasmine Elist, Los Angeles Times
When it comes to home decorating on a budget, art options get generic pretty fast. Between mass-produced images of Marilyn Monroe or New York City's taxicabs sold at big box retail stores, the works covering the walls of people's homes aren't chosen because they're particularly fresh or unique but because they are affordable and accessible. In the hopes of providing a more interesting alternative, recent University of Michigan graduates and 24-year-old L.A. natives Chelsea Neman and Jordan Klein co-founded the Tappan Collective, an online gallery selling original work by emerging artists.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 11, 2011 | Joanna Clay
Drivers on Laguna Canyon Road may have noticed that an Orange County landmark is missing. The Laguna College of Art & Design mural that graced the side of the Laguna Canyon Winery is now a plain gray wall. The mural was painted over by the winery owner who apparently did not recognize its significance. The mural was one of six in the city that were designed and painted by art school students in 2003. It was the largest mural by the college and in Orange County, mural instructor Mia Tavonatti said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 31, 1987 | BOB POOL, Times Staff Writer
Capturing the soul of Woodland Hills is quite a feat. And capturing the soles of Woodland Hills means quite a few feet. Jill Ann Field is doing both as she paints a mural on a quarter-mile-long wooden safety wall around a high-rise construction site. Field is letting Warner Center office workers and neighborhood joggers step into her illustration by painting images of their feet as they pass the building site at 21550 Oxnard St.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 9, 2010 | By Holly Myers, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Brad Eberhard's studio, in the garage of the Lincoln Heights house he shares with two friends, sits at the top of a narrow, perilously steep street, with a spacious view across what is, with all the winter rain, a vividly green hillside. A spare and comfortably tidy space, with a worktable, several shelves of books, a pair of vintage armchairs and an upturned milk crate coffee table, it is a congenial setting for an abstract painter with a taste for color and a propensity for philosophical inquiry.
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