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Art Spiegelman

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October 16, 2011 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
Art Spiegelman has been here before. At 63, dressed in black jeans, a denim shirt and that ubiquitous vest, he is talking, again, about his graphic memoir "Maus," the saga of his father Vladek's experiences during the Holocaust and of Spiegelman's efforts to get to know that father - to inhabit his story, if you will. "Maus" was originally published in two parts, the first in 1986 and the second in 1991; it won a special Pulitzer Prize in 1992, the first comic to be so honored.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 7, 2014 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
Jon McNaught's “Dockwood” (Nobrow Press: unpaged, $19.95) is one of those books you could easily overlook. Gathering two short stories in comics form, it came out in England a year ago, but although McNaught won the Prix Révélation (for best newcomer) at the 2013 Angouleme International Comics Festival - an award previously won by Daniel Clowes , Art Spiegelman and Will Eisner - he's gotten no attention in the United States. Partly, that has to do with the British comics scene, which has had its issues crossing over, and partly with McNaught's publisher, which until recently was not particularly active here.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 13, 2009
What a long way comics have come. Routinely vilified by parents half a century ago, they now "confidently [stride] into bookstores, museums, and universities," note Art Spiegelman and Françoise Mouly in their monumental "The Toon Treasury of Classic Children's Comics " (Abrams ComicArts: 352 pp., $40), "cleverly disguised as the upwardly mobile 'graphic novel.' " Spiegelman and Mouly, of course, are two of the people most responsible for this cultural rehabilitation, with their journal Raw, in which Spiegelman published, in serial form, the stories that became his Holocaust tragicomic "Maus."
ENTERTAINMENT
September 23, 2013 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
I never got to one of the most anticipated panels at Sunday's eighth Brooklyn Book Festival : A conversation between legendary comics artists Art Spiegelman and Jules Feiffer. It wasn't for lack of interest; there was just too much to do. At the same time as Spiegelman and Feiffer were doing their thing, after all, I was moderating a conversation between novelists Meg Wolitzer (“The Interestings”), Audrey Niffenegger (“The Time Traveler's Wife”) and James McBride (“The Good Lord Bird”)
NEWS
November 22, 1991 | RUSSELL MILLER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES, Miller is a New York writer
Nadja Mouly Spiegelman, 4 1/2, wanders toward a mirror that leans against the wall of the Lower Manhattan loft. "Why did you bring this down?" she asks her father. "So I can see what I look like when I draw," says Art Spiegelman, reaching out for a hug. Not so long ago Spiegelman resisted the idea of having children. "I just didn't want to be anybody's parent in the way my parents were to me," he said in an interview with Arts magazine in 1987.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 4, 2004 | Lewis Beale, Special to The Times
In the days and months following Sept. 11, Art Spiegelman began thinking the unthinkable. A 56-year-old graphic novelist who had won the Pulitzer Prize for his groundbreaking Holocaust work "Maus," Spiegelman lived in SoHo, just blocks from the World Trade Center, and had seen both buildings collapse. He and his wife had frantically run around town making sure their children were safe at their respective schools.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 7, 2004 | Kevin Baker, Special to The Times
By an amazing coincidence, I was haunted by the exact same "dominant metaphor" that obsessed Art Spiegelman following the horrible events of Sept. 11, 2001 -- one of "waiting for that other shoe to drop." Only a few million or so of our fellow New Yorkers, I'm sure, shared that feeling.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 18, 1994 | Sean Mitchell, Sean Mitchell is an occasional contributor to Calendar
When he was 15 years old, Art Spiegelman and a friend who also aspired to be a professional cartoonist decided to submit some of their drawings to the New Yorker. The two knew that the New Yorker was the top of the line in the realm of their ambition, and yet, as best they could tell, the cartoons in the magazine were so sophisticated they didn't make particular sense.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 3, 2001
Appearance--Writer and illustrator Art Spiegelman will not appear today at Storyopolis bookstore in Los Angeles. A Freebie listing that ran in Calendar Weekend on Thursday was incorrect.
BOOKS
November 24, 1991 | Alex Raksin
MAUS: A Survivor's Tale, II: And Here My Troubles Began by Art Spiegelman (Pantheon: $18; 136 pp.). Writing about the Holocaust is like rescuing someone from a raging river: Unless you first secure a strong foothold, you too will be swept away by unforgiving currents. Most Holocaust writers have found terra firma in the light at the end of the tunnel, in the promise of freedom.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 2013 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
Twelve years after the attacks that brought down the World Trade Center, the shelf of essential 9/11 reading remains pretty small. There's “The 9/11 Commission Report,” which I've long considered to be the defining narrative of the disaster (not to mention the greatest government commission report ever written), although for all its deft and nuanced sense of explication, it doesn't tell us much about how things felt. And, of course, there are dozens of works of reportage and fiction -- even Stephen King's new novel “Doctor Sleep,” due out a little later this month, features its own small riff about the events of that September morning, as does Thomas Pynchon's new novel "Bleeding Edge" -- but few have really encapsulated the weight, the magnitude of the tragedy.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 19, 2012 | By Liesl Bradner
Long known for being genteel and charmingly indifferent to headline news, the New Yorker in recent years has earned a reputation of skewering political and cultural figures with its cover art. Barry Blitt's infamous 2008 Barack and Michelle Obama fist bump cover poking fun at the perception of the then-presidential candidate, for instance, spawned countless satiric imitations. With "Blown Covers: New Yorker Covers You Were Never Meant to See" (Abrams), art director Françoise Mouly gives readers a behind-the-scenes look at the selection process.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 19, 2012 | By J. Hoberman, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The office pools have closed, let the drama begin: Silent film or 3-D talkie, Streep's Thatcher or Williams' Marilyn or maybe Viola Davis? Scorsese again? For me, the most fascinating question is which of the five foreign-film nominees will win. If you picked Asghar Farhadi's "A Separation" — a visceral chamber drama exposing all manner of class, religious and gender fissures in contemporary Iran — you went for the favorite, winner of numerous critics' awards, "a movie you'll love from a country you hate," as the late Bingham Ray jokingly promoted "The White Balloon.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 16, 2011 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
Art Spiegelman has been here before. At 63, dressed in black jeans, a denim shirt and that ubiquitous vest, he is talking, again, about his graphic memoir "Maus," the saga of his father Vladek's experiences during the Holocaust and of Spiegelman's efforts to get to know that father - to inhabit his story, if you will. "Maus" was originally published in two parts, the first in 1986 and the second in 1991; it won a special Pulitzer Prize in 1992, the first comic to be so honored.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 4, 2011
"Here Is New York: A Democracy of Photographs" by Gilles Peress, Michael Shulan, Charles Traub and Alice Rose George (2002). Perhaps the most stunning visual representation of the tragedy, this collection of nearly 1,000 images - shot by hundreds of photographers, professional and amateur - traces the devastation of the World Trade Center from impact to aftermath, with a clarity made all the more profound by the chaos that impelled it. The title comes...
ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 2010
Emily Dickinson's Homestead Limited edition print available from m-plus-e.com, $20 Michael Fusco and Emma Straub have designed a great set of prints of writer's homes. Also available: the houses of Edward Gorey, Edgar Allan Poe and Flannery O'Connor. Glamour From the Ground Up Ed Fox Taschen, $17.99 Hardcover/DVD edition This native Angeleno's sensual celebration of the female foot comes with ingenious packaging: a reversible jacket for incognito perusing.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 1, 1995
Art Spiegelman wrongly concludes that the movie "Schindler's List" attempts to define the Holocaust ("Now, for a Little Hedonism," by Sean Mitchell, Dec. 18). "Schindler's List" was never intended as a definitive statement of the Holocaust and Nazi atrocities--and Steven Spielberg has stated this for the record. The impact of this movie lies in its ability to deliver a stunning visual message--and as an educational device, to very large numbers. Let those who would deny the Holocaust ever took place see this movie.
NEWS
December 6, 1994 | BILL HIGGINS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The Scene: Thursday's party hosted by the New Yorker magazine at Dennis Hopper's house for contributing editor and artist Art Spiegelman. The cartoonist, who won a Pulitzer Prize special award for his Holocaust-based book "Maus," has illustrated Joseph Moncure March's 1928 novel-in-verse, "The Wild Party." Quoted: "I wanted to do something that was anti-'Maus,' something antithetical," said the chain-smoking Spiegelman. "Something that was erotic, something decorative.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 30, 2010 | By Charles Solomon, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Although he neither coined the term "graphic novel" nor invented the form, Will Eisner ranks among America's most celebrated and influential sequential artists. The creator of "The Spirit" (a comic book hero who solved crimes without recourse to superpowers or high-tech gadgetry), "The Contract With God" (depicting tenement life during the Depression) and three books on writing and drawing sequential art, Eisner has influenced a generation of artists, writers and animators, including Jules Feiffer, Art Spiegelman and Brad Bird.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 20, 2010 | By John Reed, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The Search for Smilin' Ed! Kim Deitch Fantagraphics Books: 162 pp., $16.99 paper Graphic novels should be better. They should be so much better that serious readers bristle at the genre designation, which is too narrow and diminutive. Few artists have exceeded the limitations of either the market or the dual skill sets required by the form. Terrific writers who know how to work with artists, terrific artists who know how to work with writers: These abound. Perhaps like the art of the moving picture, "picto-fiction" (to cite a term introduced by Entertainment Comics in the 1950s)
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