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Art Thefts

ENTERTAINMENT
November 5, 2004 | From Associated Press
The Munch Museum in Oslo, Norway, could remain closed until June while officials upgrade its security system following a brazen daylight robbery in August of two Edvard Munch masterpieces. The city-owned museum on Thursday released a report that it had commissioned after the Aug. 22 armed robbery and said the security flaws it found could cost as much as $7.8 million to fix and take until June to complete.
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NEWS
July 30, 1994 | From Associated Press
A 1786 portrait of Thomas Jefferson on loan to the Polaroid Corp. to be photographed was reported stolen Friday from a warehouse safe. The theft was discovered at the Polaroid Museum Replica division when an employee noticed the eighth-floor safe had been dismantled, apparently with a hammer and chisel, police said. The 26-by-36-inch painting by Mather Brown shows Jefferson from the waist up, holding some papers, with a statue in the background. It was in a gold-colored frame.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 9, 1988 | EDWIN CHEN
The butler didn't do it. With that Los Angeles County Superior Court jury verdict, Rune Gunnar Donell was exonerated Friday on criminal charges of stealing a valuable oil painting from the Bel-Air chateau of his longtime employers, Howard and Elizabeth Keck. Elizabeth Keck, now estranged from her husband, had alleged that Donell stole the painting and sold it in his native Sweden for $500,000.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 10, 1988 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, Times Staff Writer
An Italian magistrate investigating the theft of archeological artifacts said Tuesday that he believes at least two archaic Greek sculptures stolen from a site in central Sicily have wound up in the J. Paul Getty Museum in Malibu. Judge Silvio Raffiotta, himself an archeology buff, described the two works as marble statues from the 6th Century BC. He said they were dug up in 1979 by treasure hunters at nearby Morgantina, an important Greek city until its sack by Roman legions in 211 BC.
NEWS
August 12, 1991 | MICHAEL HAEDERLE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Senior bow priest Perry Tsadiasi bends down to embrace the long, brown-bagged bundle lying on the table. Clutching it to his cheek, Tsadiasi whispers a prayer in the gentle, confidential murmur of a parent comforting a lost child. The religious elder takes the bundle in his arms, slowly circles the room while repeating the chant and pauses at the doorway, where an offering of sacred cornmeal has been strewn in his path. The purification rite is complete.
NEWS
April 23, 1992 | DAVID COLKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Marvin Cohodas looked at a photograph of an American Indian basket in 1983 and knew he had seen the artifact before. As an expert in basketry of the Washoe--a small, ill-fated tribe that once lived in the Lake Tahoe area--Cohodas had seen thousands of baskets. The picture had been sent to him by a private collector contemplating a purchase. But this basket should not have been for sale.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 12, 1989 | EDWIN CHEN, Times Staff Writer
Libby Keck was distraught as she stood in the conservatory of her $42-million, treasure-filled Bel-Air mansion. "Look at that!" she shrieked. "Yes, ma'am," her bodyguard and chauffeur, Roger Paine, replied hesitantly. Sensing his uncertainty, Keck led him by the hand to a painting and ran his fingers across its surface. It was as smooth as glass. Paine knew right away that it was no Impressionistic oil painting but a high-quality color photograph. "Well, hell!
NEWS
August 12, 1996 | MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the long-running battle between the wealthy art collectors of the world's great cities and the cultural nationalists of the hot and dusty outback, score one for the nationalists. The latest round has come to an end in this ancient city, in a room just to the right of the central stairway in the National Archeological Museum.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 2004 | From Associated Press
An 18th century oil painting recently discovered to have been looted by the Nazis during the occupation of France and later donated to the Utah Museum of Fine Arts will be returned to its rightful owners. "Les Amoureux Jeunes," or "The Young Lovers," by Francois Boucher (1707-70) was stolen in 1940 from the French art dealer Andrew Jean Seligmann. Two of Seligmann's heirs will travel to Salt Lake City next month to take possession of it.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 4, 2000 | BOBBY CUZA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a theft intricately planned and deftly executed, two Marc Chagall paintings worth more than half a million dollars were stolen from a Beverly Hills art gallery, owner Tim Yarger said Saturday. In addition to outsmarting a sophisticated security system, the thief ignored more valuable works by Picasso and Renoir, leading management to believe that the burglary was commissioned by someone with specific tastes.
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