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NEWS
October 13, 2007 | MEGHAN DAUM
It's been a big week for non-figurative art. On Thursday, it was reported that French archaeologists discovered a wall painting in Syria whose tricolored, geometric pattern resembles the work of abstract painter Paul Klee. The catch: At 11,000 years old, it's the oldest painting in the world. So much for the theory that the Impressionists changed everything.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 2014 | By Deborah Vankin, Los Angeles Times
The Santa Monica Museum of Art's annual Incognito benefit may be the most democratic of all Los Angeles art world soirees: 700 works for sale by emerging and famous artists alike, all 10 by 10 inches and exactly $350 - with the artists' identities hidden from view until after purchase. But that doesn't mean strategy isn't involved. The event, which turns 10 this year, has become a touchstone for collectors looking to find valuable works by the likes of Barbara Kruger, Raymond Pettibon and Ed Ruscha.
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NEWS
January 20, 1998
Art is where you find it. Young Hernan Mesa passes it while hauling water home in South-Central Los Angeles. Otherwise absorbed, Hetzel Geanne, left, and Clement Madelena ignore it in the first moments of their visit to the new Getty Center in Brentwood. And car buff Jack Hinkle finds it at the Greater Los Angeles Auto Show, where he finds sweeping lines and seductive textures in the newly redesigned Mazda Miata. Detail Work Some tasks can only be performed close up.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 2014 | By David Ng and Mike Boehm
The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences has plucked an established figure from the art museum world who has extensive knowledge of cinema to lead its highly anticipated $300-million movie museum. Kerry Brougher, a veteran art curator who worked at L.A.'s Museum of Contemporary Art for 14 years, has been named the director of the Academy Museum of Motion Pictures, said a spokeswoman for the academy on Tuesday. It is unclear when Brougher will start his new job. The museum isn't scheduled to open until 2017 and the spokeswoman said academy officials were unable to comment further on Brougher's appointment at this time.
NATIONAL
April 4, 2010 | By Tina Susman
It's hard to say which booth was drawing more attention at Artexpo New York: the one with the paint-splashed naked man holding a box around his hips, or the one displaying cityscape paintings of tall buildings that resembled what you would see if the naked man dropped his box. If -- as Chicago gallery owner Woody Slaymaker said -- the only thing worse than a lousy comment about your art is no comment at all, then creators of both works must have...
ENTERTAINMENT
July 21, 2013 | By Irene Lacher
American painter and '80s star Eric Fischl offers a sharp critique of the art world's recent evolution in his memoir, "Bad Boy: My Life On and Off the Canvas. " He elaborated in a conversation from his home in Sag Harbor, N.Y. You write that so much of your life has been "a search for normal. " What did you mean by that? Whatever "normal" was, it was different from the situation I grew up in. It seemed like a better place, rather than feeling like an outsider or neglected or estranged.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 8, 2013 | By Christopher Knight, Los Angeles Times Art Critic
Super-sized exhibitions are becoming more common in art museums, and the next few months will see several among the notable new shows opening around town. Chronologically, here's a selection of what's coming up in art this spring, including three really big shows: "War/Photography: Images of Armed Conflict and Its Aftermath" Annenberg Space for Photography, March 23-June 2 Some war photographs are indelibly printed in America's cultural memory, such as Joe Rosenthal's carefully choreographed 1945 picture of the raising of the flag at Iwo Jima or Huynh Cong "Nick" Ut's image of a naked Vietnamese girl running from a napalm attack in 1972 (both for the Associated Press)
ENTERTAINMENT
February 15, 2013 | By Christopher Knight, Los Angeles Times Art Critic
Sunday marks the 100th anniversary of arguably the most famous art exhibition of the 20th century On Lexington Avenue at 25th Street in New York, the ad hoc Assn. of American Painters and Sculptors opened the International Exhibition of Modern Art on Feb. 17, 1913, beginning just under a monthlong run. Housed in the hulking brick headquarters of the 69th Infantry Regiment Armory, it quickly became known as simply the Armory Show. Or maybe not so simply. The Armory Show was hugely controversial.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 16, 1986
An agreement has been reached to respect the patrimony of Goya's portrait of the Marquesa de Santa Cruz and return it to Spain. That is a happy conclusion of an affair that did the commercial side of the world of art no credit. There is not sufficient evidence to know whether Lord Wimborne should be thanked for agreeing to a $6-million offer from Spain. He has said that he just about broke even.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 8, 1998 | DIANE HAITHMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A photo self-portrait of Catherine Opie shows the artist ornately tattooed and dressed in leather, with a nipple ring, multiple needles piercing the length of bare arms and a leather mask pulled down over her face. Los Angeles businessman and art collector Clyde Beswick bought the artwork sight unseen, then hung it over the sofa in his Mt. Washington home, where others might place a landscape or a bowl of fruit. Those in L.A.'
ENTERTAINMENT
April 5, 2014 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
Shortly after assuming the helm as the fourth director of the Museum of Contemporary Art last month, Philippe Vergne visited the Los Angeles Times to meet with editors and writers. Still in the beginning stage of absorbing MOCA's history and formulating his mission, he didn't have a great deal to share about his plans. But when asked whether he thought performance, a currently disregarded part of the museum's founding mission, was important, Vergne answered that he wouldn't call it important.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2014 | By Philip Brandes
“Every great artist has freed himself from something - his family, his nation, his race,” warns the worldly mentor to an aspiring painter in Chaim Potok's semi-autobiographical novel, “My Name Is Asher Lev.” As the Fountain Theatre's affecting L.A. premiere of Aaron Posner's three-actor stage adaptation eloquently illustrates, the greater the artist, the more painful sacrifices that separation entails. Posner's script skillfully retains the book's introspective narrative voice, philosophical insights and essential plot points, as its title character (played with convincing passion by Jason Karasev)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 2014 | By David Colker
Stanley Grinstein, who played a pivotal role in the art scene in Los Angeles as it was evolving in the 1960s and '70s, was an unlikely candidate for that role. He was not an artist or even, at the beginning, a collector. He was in the forklift business and had a great fondness for USC football. But in 1952, Grinstein got married and he and his wife, Elyse, went in search of a pastime they could mutually enjoy. "They were looking for something they could do together, some kind of common ground," said their daughter Ayn Grinstein.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 2014 | By Deborah Vankin
A cigarette dangles from the mouth of art iconoclast Dave Hickey as he cracks open the door of the Presidential Suite at downtown Los Angeles' Ace Hotel. Coffee cups, reading material and cigarette butts litter the room, which is dark except for one low-glowing lamp. The dim light silhouettes Hickey's sturdy, broad-chested frame as he shuffles toward the hotel room's patio. "Come on in," he yells in a deep, Southern-inflected voice. "I'll be outside having a smoke. What is there to talk about anyway?
ENTERTAINMENT
January 30, 2014 | By David Ng
Los Angeles street artist Shepard Fairey and New York art titan Jasper Johns come from different sides of the country and the contemporary art world, but they are similar in at least one respect: They both hail from South Carolina. The artists will be the subject of a retrospective starting in May in Fairey's hometown of Charleston coinciding with the 2014 Spoleto Festival. The exhibition, "The Insistent Image: Recurrent Motifs in the Art of Shepard Fairey and Jasper Johns," will feature new work by Fairey and a survey of prints by Johns from 1982 to 2012.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 30, 2014 | By Deborah Vankin
Art critic Dave Hickey has apparently emerged from his much-publicized art world retirement - and, some feel, not in the most auspicious way. Hickey, who has a new book of cultural essays out called “Pirates and Farmers, ” gave a talk and signed books Wednesday night at Grand Central Market, at an event sponsored by the Museum of Contemporary Art. During the talk, Hickey, who's known - and loved by some - for being provocative, apparently made...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 24, 2008 | Suzanne Muchnic, Muchnic is a Times staff writer.
Patricia Faure -- a prominent Los Angeles art dealer and glamorous personality whose teenage dreams of movie stardom gave way to careers in modeling, fashion photography and, finally, the art business -- has died. She was 80. Faure died in her sleep of natural causes early Tuesday at Kingsley Manor, a retirement community in Hollywood, said her daughter, designer Zazu Faure. A distinctive fixture in the L.A.
NEWS
August 9, 1996 | MARK EHRMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Perhaps Hollywood felt that a film like "Basquiat," the Julian Schnabel-directed film about the life, exploitation and addiction of artist Jean-Michel Basquiat, who died of a heroin overdose in 1988, would be a bit too much of a downer to be the focus of a big West Coast shindig. But for the art world, Wednesday night's screening and benefit reception at the Pacific Design Center was something to crow about despite the downbeat nature of the story.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 20, 2014 | By Deborah Vankin
When the LA Art Show -- which wrapped its 19 th event on Sunday -- launched its first underground art section this year, executive producer Kim Martindale had some concerns. Among them: The show has been criticized in the past for being less focused than other more niche-oriented art fairs, seeing as it combines historic, traditional, modern and contemporary art. "I'm sure there will be people saying, 'Why's this here?'" Martindale said. "But that's what this show is about - we want to be as inclusive, art-wise, as possible.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 16, 2014 | By Deborah Vankin and Mike Boehm
The Museum of Contemporary Art has named Philippe Vergne as its new director, choosing a longtime art world professional from the respected Dia Art Foundation in New York to lead the financially challenged but rebuilding institution. Vergne follows Jeffrey Deitch, who left MOCA in September 2013 with two years left in a five-year contract. Deitch was an unconventional choice when he was appointed in 2010 - a successful New York art dealer and advisor with no experience leading a nonprofit organization.
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