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ENTERTAINMENT
April 19, 2014 | By Deborah Vankin
Matjames Metson's Silver Lake studio is in a 1930s Art Deco duplex perched atop a steep flight of aging, concrete stairs overlooking a cul-de-sac, which overlooks a hillside, which overlooks a bustling intersection that, from above, appears to be teeming with tiny toy cars and action-figure people. Inside, Metson's dusty, sunlit living room-turned-art studio is also full of tiny treasures. The assemblage artist builds intricate, architectural sculptures, wall hangings and furniture made from his abundant stash of objects, most of which he finds at estate sales.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 18, 2014 | By Christopher Knight, Los Angeles Times Art Critic
Think of Byzantium, and a color leaps to mind. That color is gold. The empire ruled from the crossroads of the Mediterranean and the Black Sea for a thousand years between AD 324 and its final collapse in 1453. At the Getty Villa in Pacific Palisades, where a rare and stunning exhibition of Byzantine art recently opened, gold is everywhere. It's the ground on which biblical scenes unfold, from the tender nativity of Jesus to the brutal Passions and miraculous resurrection of Christ.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 2014 | By Mike Boehm
Los Angeles officials are starting to get serious about freeing up $7.5 million or more in city government funds that are earmarked for visual art, performances or other cultural events, but have been wrapped tightly for years in legal red tape. The unspent funds were rendered all but useless in 2007 when then-City Attorney Rocky Delgadillo ruled that the fees developers are required to pay to fund public art had to be spent within a one-block radius of the construction project that generated the fees.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 2014 | By Margaret Gray
You may have seen your share of makeovers, but nothing like the one Sheila Callaghan inflicts on her heroine in “Everything You Touch,” her lushly written dark comedy world-premiering at Boston Court Performing Arts Center. Three glamorous models descend on Jess (Kirsten Vangsness), shrieking like birds of prey, while Victor, a histrionic fashion designer (Tyler Pierce), shouts insults at her. She staggers out of the fracas in a leopard-print swing coat. CRITICS' PICKS: What to watch, where to go, what to eat This scene laid bare the savagery at the heart of every makeover, and it would have won me over - if Jessica Kubzansky's bold, lucid staging of Callaghan's theatrical vision hadn't already done so. Although at moments the script feels as if it's still evolving, the stunning production values highlight its best features (a bit like a makeover, come to think of it)
OPINION
April 16, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
When the city of Los Angeles established its "1% for the Arts" program more than two decades ago, the rationale was that commercial and municipal development takes a toll on the visual landscape of the city. To mitigate that, and to contribute to the artistic vitality of the city, developers were required to pay a fee equal to 1% of the construction value. That money was supposed to pay for art in public places. It was a smart idea to set up the Arts Development Fee Trust Fund. But it's dumb not to spend it. A recent audit by City Controller Ron Galperin found that $7.5 million was languishing in the portion of the fund that is bankrolled by developers and earmarked for public art projects, cultural events and performances.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 15, 2014 | By Mike Boehm
A new documentary film is the latest chapter in an ongoing effort to keep alive the memory of the defunct Chouinard Art Institute as a foundation slab in L.A.'s rise to art world prominence. “Curly,” produced and directed by Gianina Ferreyra, addresses the influential school's history from 1921 to 1972, when it was subsumed into the newly established California Institute of the Arts, and the 21st century effort to rekindle awareness of Chouinard. The 51-minute film's first showing is 6:30 p.m. Thursday in the community room of the South Pasadena Public Library, accompanied by a panel discussion involving a number of L.A. art luminaries connected to Chouinard, including Larry Bell, Chaz Bojorquez, Llyn Foulkes and John Van Hamersveld.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 15, 2014 | Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
Anne LeBaron is a composer as transformer. She transforms instruments, such as putting objects on the strings of the harp to tease out hidden sounds. She transforms cultural contexts, be they Kazakh, Bach or Katrina. She deals with what we know, with issues of our time and place. But her knack is for alternative realities, showing us the here and now from a point just slightly off the beaten track. That, of course, makes it difficult to generalize about a two-part portrait of LeBaron in two concerts Saturday and Sunday at REDCAT.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 12, 2014 | By Esmeralda Bermudez
They came as they were - in sandals, without makeup, their hair a bit askew. A little girl with her plastic doll. A mother of one with her pregnant belly. A cowboy with wild horses galloping on his shirt. It was picture day on the Eastside not long ago, and people - grandmothers, couples, children and teenagers - lined up to pose. The shoots were spontaneous, set up on the street without notice, as part of a 40th-anniversary project organized by Self Help Graphics & Art, Boyle Height's historic community art center.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 2014 | By Gerrick D. Kennedy and Randall Roberts
As Flatbush Zombies turned the energy up high early on Day One of the Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival, the general admission lines were deeply snarled as security staffers struggled to check in  hundreds of attendees. Despite the heat (temps were already in the high 90s), event staffers on the Empire Polo Grounds kept things light by greeting guests with cheers and high-fiving them as if they had just reached the end of a marathon. The "finish line" was the electronic stations on which guests tap with their wristbands to get beeped into the festival grounds.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 2014 | By Deborah Vankin
Some of the most colorful art at Coachella this year will be on view outside the music and arts festival. An ambitious public mural project, the first “Coachella Walls,” is underway in downtown Coachella's Pueblo Viejo District. The project, which brings together about a dozen muralists and contemporary artists internationally, has no formal connection to the concurrent, Goldenvoice-produced Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival, happening this and next weekends.  Billed as an “arts driven community revitalization project,” “Coachella Walls” was organized by the Coachella-based Date Farmers Art Studios, a.k.a., the artists Armando Lerma and Carlos Ramirez, who grew up in the area and now show their work at Ace Gallery in Los Angeles.
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