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Arthritis

NEWS
March 8, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Ciba-Geigy, a Swiss-based drug and chemicals manufacturer, has awarded UC San Diego's School of Medicine a $20-million grant to study the causes of arthritis, a disease that afflicts 37 million Americans. The agreement will fund a 50-person research team led by Dr. Dennis Carson, who is leaving Scripps Clinic & Research Foundation to join UCSD.
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HEALTH
December 17, 2001 | STEPHANIE OAKES
Question: I have arthritis in my toes and sometimes my hands and elbows, too. I try to walk for exercise, but when my toes get really sore, this isn't easy. Do you have any alternatives for exercise with arthritis? PATRICK WILTON Winter Park, Fla. Answer: Your walking routine is a great low-impact exercise for someone with arthritis, but when you have a flare-up in your toes, opt for a stationary bicycle.
NEWS
October 6, 2000 | From Associated Press
The drug maker ESI Lederle announced Thursday that it is recalling 4.2 million capsules of the arthritis drug etodolac because they are contaminated with another drug that could cause life-threatening problems in some patients. The manufacturer said the recall covers one lot--No. 9991052--of 300-milligram capsules of the drug used in arthritis and pain management. The capsules were distributed nationwide.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 29, 2004 | Steve Hymon, Times Staff Writer
Sore and creaky, eight arthritis sufferers were wheeled into operating rooms at Hollywood Presbyterian Medical Center on Saturday morning to receive knee and hip replacements -- on the house. The patients had no hassles with insurance companies, nor were there squirmy visits with the hospital's billing office. The nonprofit Operation Walk Southern California and the hospital donated the surgeries and all associated costs, including follow-up care and physical therapy.
NEWS
October 18, 1989 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Individuals who are calm and easygoing, unflappable in the face of a crisis, may be more susceptible to arthritis than those who are more excitable, according to a new study by researchers at the National Institutes of Health. The researchers have traced arthritis susceptibility in rats to a defect in the brain's regulation of the stress response, the first time the crippling disease has been linked to temperament or behavior.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 24, 1995 | From Times staff and wire reports
Adding the immunosuppressive drug cyclosporine to a regimen of the anti-arthritic drug methotrexate can significantly reduce the symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis, according to a study in the New England Journal of Medicine. A team at the University of Ottawa gave 74 arthritics methotrexate alone and 74 a combination of the two drugs.
NEWS
September 14, 1992 | GARY LIBMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Elgin Baylor's first appointment with Dr. Robert Kerlan ended before it started. Waiting in Kerlan's lobby in the early 1960s, Baylor peered through a doorway and saw the orthopedist hunched over, apparently in severe pain. "He seemed to have a problem and couldn't even help himself," says the former Laker star. "I told the receptionist I was there for a cold and had come to the wrong doctor. And I left." When other doctors could not free his knees of pain, Baylor returned.
BUSINESS
January 15, 2003 | From Reuters
Abbott Laboratories Inc. said Tuesday that it would freeze the salaries of its U.S. employees for the next six months to help finance the launch of its promising rheumatoid arthritis drug Humira. The decision will affect 34,000 workers. Humira's launch comes at a crucial time for Abbott, which needs a blockbuster drug to offset expected losses as a number of drugs come off patent.
HEALTH
April 26, 2004 | Jane E. Allen
Squatting puts tremendous stress on the knees, and doing it habitually appears to contribute to arthritis later in life. To determine the extent of that risk, Boston University medical researchers studied more than 1,800 men and women age 60 and older in China, where squatting is common.
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