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Arthur C Bartner

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 30, 1999 | HILARY E. MacGREGOR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Actor Jan-Michael Vincent, the blue-eyed bad-boy star of the 1978 cult surfing movie "Big Wednesday" and numerous films and TV movies, will have a new role Friday as grand marshal of the city's New Year's Eve party at Van Nuys Airport. Vincent, 54, was once one of the most highly paid actors in television, earning $250,000 a week for his lead role in the CBS series "Airwolf" in the 1980s. But despite his professional success, his personal life foundered.
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NEWS
February 22, 1985 | JODY JACOBS
Since he first took on the job of masterminding the 1984 Olympic Games here, Peter Ueberroth's life has been on a high roll. Once the Games were over, he accepted the job of commissioner of baseball, he made the cover of Time magazine as "Man of the Year" and he's been wined and dined and celebrated everywhere. Now it's USC's turn to pay tribute to the Olympic superman.
SPORTS
September 17, 2009 | CHRIS ERSKINE
My favorite new yoga position -- you should try this -- is slanted kind of sideways in a loge-level seat, a bag of peanuts balanced on my knee, a foamy beverage in my left hand like a six-gun. This position stretches the torso and loosens the hamstrings. A couple of innings like this and you'll feel like a new man -- or a new woman, if that's your preference. Honestly, I can't recommend this yoga stuff enough. It's a good season to stay loose, we all know that. The Dodgers are obviously saving their best for the playoffs, which makes these next 15 games sort of a chore for purists like you and me. So it goes.
SPORTS
November 19, 2000 | DAVID WHARTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Paul Hackett hurried across the field, through crowds of reporters and players, rushing toward the end of the Rose Bowl where the USC fans were seated. At any other time in the last month or so, it would have been a suicide mission. But on Saturday, after his team's last-second 38-35 victory over UCLA, Hackett went straight to the USC section and waved frantically at band director Arthur C. Bartner, who dutifully stepped down from his ladder so the embattled coach could ascend.
SPORTS
November 14, 2012 | Bill Plaschke
In the last 15 years, I've covered nearly every USC road game where the Trojans marching band performs on the field, and there's always a moment in those games that makes me cringe. It's the moment before the pregame show in which the USC drum major majestically - or is that tauntingly? - plants a sword in the middle of the opponent's field. I hate it. I'm stunned other schools allow it. It feels like more than just a piece of metal digging into grass, it feels like a lack of respect burrowing under the stadium's skin.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 31, 2006 | Deborah Schoch, Times Staff Writer
Out stepped the USC Trojan Marching Band onto Cromwell Field, a flood of musicians wearing their trademark sunglasses and short sleeves under the Southern California sun. Standouts in Trojan cardinal and gold, they swung trombones and trumpets in unison as the drum line rumbled with all the flash of Los Angeles' hometown team.
NEWS
November 21, 1986 | LONN JOHNSTON, Times Staff Writer and
There will be no traditional beer-and-doughnuts breakfast for the Stanford Band on Saturday morning. For the first time in recent memory, seasoned observers say, the Leland Stanford Jr. University Marching Band will perform sober at the Big Game football clash with UC Berkeley. Barred from the football field Nov.
NEWS
October 5, 1986 | MARY LOU LOPER, Times Staff Writer
Private universities, in order to succeed, must be risk takers--not just for any one university, but for the good of the country and the world. That's what George T. Scharffenberger, chairman of USC's board of trustees and a man who logs 500,000 miles annually traveling, told the 800 assembled the other evening for black-tie festivities at Cromwell Field on the campus. With that, Carl E.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 25, 2001 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Blast!" is writing a new chapter in musical theater history, although certain connoisseurs would rather see it quickly erased. Some of the reviews that greeted the show's Broadway premiere last spring were downright scornful. The no-story, all-spectacle production is rooted in drum and bugle corps pageantry, a subcultural slice of middle-Americana far removed from the bright lights and the big city. "Blast!"
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