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Arthur C Clarke

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NEWS
January 24, 1992 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Barefoot and clad in a navy-blue sarong, Arthur C. Clarke isn't really in the mood for visitors. It's getting toward noon, the hour his physical therapist shows up for 60 minutes of daily renovation on his wracked body. But if the legendary science-fiction writer's hands shake and he hobbles across the room, his mind is still devastatingly lucid after 74 years of dreaming and thinking. And if he seems a bit distracted at the moment, well, it's only because his mind is on Mars.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 5, 2008 | From the Associated Press
Arthur C. Clarke's health was failing fast, but he still had a story to tell. So he turned to fellow science fiction writer Frederik Pohl, and together the longtime friends wrote what turned out to be Clarke's last novel. "The Last Theorem," which grew from 100 pages of notes scribbled by Clarke, is more than a futuristic tale about a mathematician who discovers a proof to a centuries-old mathematical puzzle.
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NEWS
July 19, 1990 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When science fiction writer Gregory Benford began writing short stories in the late '60s, he wrote a fan letter to one of his literary idols, Arthur C. Clarke, author of the classic "2001: A Space Odyssey." Benford, a professor of physics at UC Irvine, continued corresponding with Clarke but didn't meet him in person until 1979, in England, during one of Clarke's infrequent trips from his longtime home in Sri Lanka.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 18, 2007 | From the Associated Press
Science-fiction writer Arthur C. Clarke listed three wishes on his 90th birthday: for the world to embrace cleaner energy resources; for a lasting peace in his adopted home, Sri Lanka; and for evidence of extraterrestrial beings. "I have always believed that we are not alone in this universe," he said in a speech to a small gathering of scientists, astronauts and government officials Sunday in Colombo, Sri Lanka.
BOOKS
June 17, 1990 | CHARLES SOLOMON
Although it doesn't include all of Arthur C. Clarke's stories about Earth ("No Morning After" and "The Nine Billion Names of God" are among the notable omissions), "Tales" offers some of the writer's finest work from the '50s and '60s. "The Road to the Sea" and "The Lion of Comarre" represent early explorations of the link between cultural stagnation and technological advance, a theme Clarke would develop more fully in "The City and the Stars."
ENTERTAINMENT
December 29, 2000 | BETH DUFF-BROWN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Leaning forward in his wheelchair, the 83-year-old man speaks deadpan into the tape recorder: "Testing one, two, three. Testing. This is not Arthur Clarke, this is his clone." As is so often the case with the grand old man of science fiction, it's a fantasy that might well be a reality in the years to come. A Houston-based company called Encounter 2001 has six strands from his thin gray hair and wants to launch Clarke DNA into space.
NEWS
January 29, 1996 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
His prodigiously creative mind has transported tens of millions of his fellow earthlings on journeys to other galaxies, suns and planets. But at this particular juncture on the time-space continuum, Arthur C. Clarke has his attention focused on a different kind of orb: a Ping-Pong ball. "This . . .
ENTERTAINMENT
December 18, 2007 | From the Associated Press
Science-fiction writer Arthur C. Clarke listed three wishes on his 90th birthday: for the world to embrace cleaner energy resources; for a lasting peace in his adopted home, Sri Lanka; and for evidence of extraterrestrial beings. "I have always believed that we are not alone in this universe," he said in a speech to a small gathering of scientists, astronauts and government officials Sunday in Colombo, Sri Lanka.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 5, 2008 | From the Associated Press
Arthur C. Clarke's health was failing fast, but he still had a story to tell. So he turned to fellow science fiction writer Frederik Pohl, and together the longtime friends wrote what turned out to be Clarke's last novel. "The Last Theorem," which grew from 100 pages of notes scribbled by Clarke, is more than a futuristic tale about a mathematician who discovers a proof to a centuries-old mathematical puzzle.
BOOKS
February 4, 2001 | THOMAS M. DISCH, Thomas M. Disch is the author of "The Dreams Our Stuff Is Made Of: How Science Fiction Conquered the World."
If greatness in science fiction is to be measured by a writer's impact on the culture at large, H.G. Wells was surely the greatest of the 20th century. Just as surely, the greatest during the half of the century Wells wasn't around for, when the genre was at its height, has been Arthur C. Clarke, who has just published a compilation of his stories, nearly 1,000 densely packed pages in length.
NEWS
November 1, 2001
Arthur C. Clarke, author of "2001: A Space Odyssey" and numerous other science-fiction hallmarks, rarely does interviews. But he owed us. On Feb. 3, 1946, The Times ran the first newspaper story about his proposal for communications satellites to bounce radio and TV signals around the world.
BOOKS
February 4, 2001 | THOMAS M. DISCH, Thomas M. Disch is the author of "The Dreams Our Stuff Is Made Of: How Science Fiction Conquered the World."
If greatness in science fiction is to be measured by a writer's impact on the culture at large, H.G. Wells was surely the greatest of the 20th century. Just as surely, the greatest during the half of the century Wells wasn't around for, when the genre was at its height, has been Arthur C. Clarke, who has just published a compilation of his stories, nearly 1,000 densely packed pages in length.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 29, 2000 | BETH DUFF-BROWN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Leaning forward in his wheelchair, the 83-year-old man speaks deadpan into the tape recorder: "Testing one, two, three. Testing. This is not Arthur Clarke, this is his clone." As is so often the case with the grand old man of science fiction, it's a fantasy that might well be a reality in the years to come. A Houston-based company called Encounter 2001 has six strands from his thin gray hair and wants to launch Clarke DNA into space.
NEWS
March 1, 2000 | MICHAEL HARRIS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Book clubs and discussion groups are going to feast on "The Light of Other Days." Though it is only middlingly successful as a novel, it's extraordinarily rich in ideas, for which Arthur C. Clarke ("2001: A Space Odyssey," "Rendezvous With Rama") and Stephen Baxter ("The Time Ships") construct plausible scientific underpinnings. For example: What if human beings lost all their privacy forever?
NEWS
January 29, 1996 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
His prodigiously creative mind has transported tens of millions of his fellow earthlings on journeys to other galaxies, suns and planets. But at this particular juncture on the time-space continuum, Arthur C. Clarke has his attention focused on a different kind of orb: a Ping-Pong ball. "This . . .
NEWS
January 24, 1992 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Barefoot and clad in a navy-blue sarong, Arthur C. Clarke isn't really in the mood for visitors. It's getting toward noon, the hour his physical therapist shows up for 60 minutes of daily renovation on his wracked body. But if the legendary science-fiction writer's hands shake and he hobbles across the room, his mind is still devastatingly lucid after 74 years of dreaming and thinking. And if he seems a bit distracted at the moment, well, it's only because his mind is on Mars.
NEWS
November 1, 2001
Arthur C. Clarke, author of "2001: A Space Odyssey" and numerous other science-fiction hallmarks, rarely does interviews. But he owed us. On Feb. 3, 1946, The Times ran the first newspaper story about his proposal for communications satellites to bounce radio and TV signals around the world.
BOOKS
December 9, 1990 | Gary Westfahl, Westfahl has published two books about science fiction
Arthur C. Clarke has long been fascinated with two mysterious worlds: outer space and the Earth's oceans. His voyages beyond the stars have been more celebrated, but in works like "The Deep Range," "Dolphin Island" and "Cradle," he has repeatedly ventured beneath the waves as well.
BOOKS
December 9, 1990 | Gary Westfahl, Westfahl has published two books about science fiction
Arthur C. Clarke has long been fascinated with two mysterious worlds: outer space and the Earth's oceans. His voyages beyond the stars have been more celebrated, but in works like "The Deep Range," "Dolphin Island" and "Cradle," he has repeatedly ventured beneath the waves as well.
NEWS
July 19, 1990 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When science fiction writer Gregory Benford began writing short stories in the late '60s, he wrote a fan letter to one of his literary idols, Arthur C. Clarke, author of the classic "2001: A Space Odyssey." Benford, a professor of physics at UC Irvine, continued corresponding with Clarke but didn't meet him in person until 1979, in England, during one of Clarke's infrequent trips from his longtime home in Sri Lanka.
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