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MAGAZINE
December 2, 1990
As interesting and informative as was Weisman's article on Arthur Demarest's excavations of the Mayan civilization, one could wish for less hyperbole. We may have underestimated the glories of native American peoples, but let us not now be guilty of this kind of exaggeration: "Their monumental architecture, as well as their painting, astronomy, mathematics and literature, humbled the achievements of their contemporaries in Europe." While it is true that most of us are unaware of how impressive were the Mayan accomplishments in these areas, the statement is patently false in all areas except possibly astronomy.
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MAGAZINE
December 2, 1990
As interesting and informative as was Weisman's article on Arthur Demarest's excavations of the Mayan civilization, one could wish for less hyperbole. We may have underestimated the glories of native American peoples, but let us not now be guilty of this kind of exaggeration: "Their monumental architecture, as well as their painting, astronomy, mathematics and literature, humbled the achievements of their contemporaries in Europe." While it is true that most of us are unaware of how impressive were the Mayan accomplishments in these areas, the statement is patently false in all areas except possibly astronomy.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 14, 1989 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, Times Science Writer
The mystery of the Maya demise has haunted anthropologists for centuries, but researchers may be on the verge of solving the sudden disappearance of one of history's most advanced civilizations. The Maya were "the most sophisticated, literate, complex people in the New World," according to anthropologist Arthur Demarest of Vanderbilt University.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 14, 1989 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, Times Science Writer
The mystery of the Maya demise has haunted anthropologists for centuries, but researchers may be on the verge of solving the sudden disappearance of one of history's most advanced civilizations. The Maya were "the most sophisticated, literate, complex people in the New World," according to anthropologist Arthur Demarest of Vanderbilt University.
NEWS
September 8, 2000 | Newsday
A royal palace and the remains of an ancient Maya city--one of the richest yet known--were recently found deep in a neglected part of a Guatemalan rain forest, scientists announced Thursday. The site, called Cancuen, has been known for a century but was generally dismissed as a place of little interest. Now Vanderbilt University archeologist Arthur Demarest says an enormous three-story palace showing signs of extraordinary riches is hidden within a tree-covered mound of rock, debris and dirt.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 20, 1993 | MARTIN ZIMMERMAN
If you're bored to tears with today's coverage of the Clinton ascension, there is a decent "and now, something completely different" alternative on PBS tonight. "Lost Kingdoms of the Maya," a "National Geographic" special (at 8 p.m. on KCET-TV Channel 28 and KPBS-TV Channel 15, and 7 p.m. on KVCR-TV Channel 24), is a leisurely look at the Maya world of today and past, and it couldn't be more removed from the Capitol hoopla.
SCIENCE
September 19, 2002 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A hieroglyphic stairway exposed last fall by a hurricane at the Maya city of Dos Pilas tells the story of the brutal and bloody war between two superpowers that were trying to dominate their known world. A new translation of the epic tale fills a vital 60-year gap in Maya history during a period that set the stage for the ultimate collapse of the Maya civilization.
SCIENCE
April 24, 2004 | Thomas H. Maugh II, Times Staff Writer
A magnificent stone panel unearthed from a royal ball court in the late-Maya capital of Cancuen shows that the Pasion River kingdom was thriving even as other Maya capitals were disintegrating in the last stages of the ancient civilization. The slab, which shows Cancuen's King Taj Chan Ahk extending his power by installing a subordinate king in the nearby city of Machaquila, "is one of the greatest masterpieces of Maya art ever discovered in Guatemala," according to epigrapher Federico Fahsen.
NEWS
November 14, 1989 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
A UCLA archeologist has identified what is apparently the earliest major center of Mayan civilization yet found, a discovery that extends the era of Mayan cities back four centuries into a period that was thought to be dominated by simple village life.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 21, 2000 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Indiana Jones, snake hater that he was, would have loathed Cancuen. Cancuen, in the heart of the Guatemalan rain forest, is overrun with snakes: fer de lance, rattlesnakes, coral snakes, eyelash vipers. "We have everything," a village chieftain says proudly. The very name means "Place of Serpents." But Cancuen now has a new claim to fame as one of the most unusual cities in the Maya empire, according to archeologist Arthur Demarest of Vanderbilt University.
MAGAZINE
October 14, 1990 | Alan Weisman, Alan Weisman, who frequently writes for this magazine, is currently in Latin America working on "Vanishing Homelands," a documentary series for National Public Radio.
THE JUNGLE IS SO THICK THAT ARTHUR Demarest and the archeological inspector assigned to him don't see the army platoon until the comandante is in their path, demanding identification. Demarest has plenty: documents from Guatemala's History and Anthropology Institute, a gold-sealed letter from National Geographic and even a notarized Spanish translation of his Harvard diploma.
SCIENCE
October 30, 2003 | Thomas H. Maugh II, Times Staff Writer
A cooperative effort by Maya village elders, an American archeologist and Guatemalan federal police has led to the recovery of a precious Maya altar looted from an archeological dig -- and to one of the largest arrests of looters and illicit artifact dealers in that country's history. The altar's recovery is a tale that might have come straight from the archives of Indiana Jones or Lara Croft, replete with clandestine raids, fierce gun battles and dangerous undercover investigations.
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